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Sunday, August 5
 

15:00

Bookstore Open

Abstract:
Come check out the latest literature on agile practices.

Sunday August 5, 2018 15:00 - 19:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

15:00

Registration Open

Abstract:
Pick-up your badge and conference materials and ask any questions you may have at Agile2018 throughout the week.

Register and attend the Early Registration Meet & Greet on Sunday from 18:00 - 19:00 to miss the crowd!

Sunday August 5, 2018 15:00 - 19:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

15:15

First Time Attendee Orientation (Brian Button)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
New to the Agile2018? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2018, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Speakers

Sunday August 5, 2018 15:15 - 15:45
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

18:00

Early Registration Meet & Greet

Abstract:
Attend the Early Registration Meet & Greet on Sunday from 18:00 - 19:00 to miss the crowd!

Sunday August 5, 2018 18:00 - 19:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

18:15

First Time Attendee Orientation (Brian Button)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
New to the Agile2018? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2018, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Speakers

Sunday August 5, 2018 18:15 - 18:45
Marriott Salon 1 & 2
 
Monday, August 6
 

07:30

Registration Open

Abstract:
Pick-up your badge and conference materials and ask any questions you may have at Agile2018 throughout the week.

Monday August 6, 2018 07:30 - 17:30
Marriott Grand Foyer

08:00

Breakfast

Breakfast

Monday August 6, 2018 08:00 - 09:00
Pacific Ballroom

08:00

Bookstore Open

Abstract:
Come check out the latest literature on agile practices.

Monday August 6, 2018 08:00 - 18:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

08:15

First Time Attendee Orientation (Brian Button)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
New to the Agile2018? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2018, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 08:15 - 08:45
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

09:00

The Future of Work & Healthy Teams (that might not be agile) (Dominic Price)

Abstract:
We're in times of unprecedented change, and impacts to work around talent, customers, competition, tech, and disruption. The businesses, teams, and people, that will thrive in this new world, require a new set of muscles and disciplines. Dom will talk through his experience in helping Atlassian scale over the last 5 years (what worked, and what didn't!), and also insights into how they are helping their customers evolve. More guidance, less process.

Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Grand Ballroom

09:00

Agile Alliance Initiatives

Abstract:
Initiatives are ideas and concepts that develop into plans for action. They are proposed by Agile Alliance members or the Agile Alliance board of directors. Initiatives help the Alliance deliver on its mission to support people who explore and apply Agile values, principles, and practices to make building software solutions more effective, humane, and sustainable.” There is an Initiative Shepherd available to assist individuals with concept development.

Stop by the Agile Alliance Lounge to see all our initiatives, get involved, or propose one of your own!

Monday August 6, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:00

Agile Alliance Lounge Open

Abstract:
Take a break from Agile2018 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff, and visit the Agile Advice and Business Agility areas. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Monday August 6, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

10:15

Morning Break

Morning Break

Monday August 6, 2018 10:15 - 10:45
All Foyers

10:30

Business Agility Lab

Abstract:
Did you know that over half of Agile teams have issues with development and business people working together effectively? A core principle behind the Agile Manifesto is that they must do so daily throughout their project. Without adopting the Agile practice of daily collaboration, organizations struggle to deliver high customer value.

To address this, Agile Alliance will have a special area in the Agile Alliance Lounge: the Business Agility Lab. You’ll be able to participate in one of the widest retrospectives regarding understanding key positive and negative themes with Agile and business — the Narrative Project. You can add your voice by submitting a story or helping design experiments to amplify Agile principles inside your company.

Business leaders who understand the benefits of Agile will also be on hand to offer tips about improving your company’s Agile adoption process. Ray Arell (former Sr. Director at Intel), Heidi Musser (former VP & CIO at USAA), Hendrik Esser (VP at Ericson), and Steve Denning (former Director at World Bank) look forward to helping you!

The Business Agility Lab will be open Monday-Thursday from 10:30-16:30, with activities announced daily. We look forward to your participation!

Monday August 6, 2018 10:30 - 12:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

10:45

Joining Forces: An Agile Experiment in Merging Teams (Kevin Normand)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When teams are working well and firing on all cylinders, you don’t want to mess with them. But what happens when two such teams are merged into one for the duration of a project? In this experiment we did just that, and what we stumbled upon was a bit surprising - and inspiring!
In this report we begin by exploring why mixing things up from time to time can be valuable opportunities for mentoring, improving work practices, rejuvenating spirits, and let’s not forget - meeting that aggressive deadline. We then dive into the recipe we found to make the experiment work (for example, that the teams should each bring unique value to the project while having at least some overlapping skill sets and work practices, that both teams should have similar Agile work practices and be ready to compromise, and that individual roles should be clearly defined from the start). Finally, we share retrospective feedback from team members highlighting the positive experience.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Bringing two teams together for duration of a project: a) is a refreshing experience for the teams with high engagement and creativity - an opportunity to break away from the mundane; b) can be very effective for meeting an aggressive deadline; c) actually improves communication between individuals
  • Steep learning curves are quickly overcome by working with knowledgeable peers
  • People enjoy learning from new colleagues; but can be shy about mentoring new colleagues.
  • Kick off the project with a meet-your-neighbor retrospective
  • Leave time in the first planning meetings for consolidation of practices - be ready to compromise on story point metrics, definitions of constructs; and then move on. When the teams are already performing similar Agile practices, the combined process is easier for all.
  • "Role collisions” are a possibility. Good leadership and teamwork skills will come into play very quickly.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Normand

Kevin Normand

Deputy Manager, R&D, Fugro
Devotee in the arts of Agile, Machine Learning, C#, Git, JIRA, Confluence, AWS, C++, team spirit, transportation planning, cycling, team sports, teamwork, maps, old maps, new maps, and more. Proponent of retrospectives, continuous learning, roundabouts, and Joy in the workplace! Advocate... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 11:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

10:45

The First Impression: Techniques for Hiring and Getting Hired by an Agile Company (Robert Woods, Holly Carman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Making the transition to agile ways of working brings about an approximate 10% personnel turnover on average and in some cases even higher. Why?
For the individual, some feel they can't work in this new open and collaborative environment they are experiencing, others are managed out as their lack of engagement becomes apparent, still more leave just at the discussion of Agile before even getting to see the benefits. On the other hand, there are those who have always worked in agile ways before they knew it was called "Agile". They want to work for an Agile Company but keep getting rejected because they don't have the background in an agile organization.
As an Agile Company, you understand the critical nature of the culture change going on and how difficult it can be to maintain that shift. You want to add to the great people you have now and support the foundation of the changes going on. Bringing the wrong person into the organization could completely undermine your efforts and create a cancerous situation that sets you back as opposed to propelling you forward but you fear missing out on the "Diamond in the Rough".
What do you do as an Agile Company when you need to hire "agile people" to continue to build & promote this new culture and show how awesome you are?
What can you do as a passionate Agilist wanting to help an Agile Company be great and just need to get your foot in the door to show how awesome you are?
Robert Woods, National Agile Practice Director and Holly Carman, Sr Account Executive for Matrix will be helping attendees in easy and practical ways to change your internal hiring practices, interview techniques, message and onboarding into one designed to entice the type of folks that can help build your agile culture. They will also help those who want to work in an Agile organization to know how best to market yourself to an agile organization to get the best possible chance for landing that great job.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Techniques for hiring and onboarding practices that encourage agile prospects to apply.
  • * How an Agile Company can find the agile diamond in the rough.
  • * Techniques for successfully marketing yourself to an Agile Company.
  • * What you need to know to ace an agile interview .
  • * What NOT to do as an Agile Company hiring or in looking for an Agile position.


Speakers
avatar for Holly Carman

Holly Carman

Market Manager, MATRIX
Holly Carman serves as the Florida Market Manager at MATRIX. She has been in IT since 2011 supporting both mid-sized to large companies with their Agile transformations utilizing MATRIX’s Agile consulting and staffing solutions. She supports a variety of different industries such... Read More →
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Director National Agile Practice, MATRIX
Robert Woods serves as Director of the National Agile Practice at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 20 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 8

10:45

Introduction to Agile: The Genesis (Paul Hammond)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What is this thing everyone calls Agile? If you have been doing software development a different way your whole career you may be wondering why should I change, what’s so different? In this introductory talk we will define why Agile is more than a process or methodology; it really involves changing your culture to improve your software development. To provide some additional context we’ll also:
  • Look back at how the Agile methods and practices emerged
  • Discuss the Agile Manifesto and 12 Principles and their resulting impact on the way that we do software development today
  • Describe what it’s like to work on Agile Project
  • Describe what you can do next Monday to get started

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Learn common myths and misconceptions of agile
  • * Understand the why behind what we do
  • * Understand the importance of identifying your existing culture and how it impacts adopting agile


Speakers
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina D

10:45

What's Important About Agile Leadership? (Marsha Acker)

Abstract:
Leadership is a response to the need for collective action. The concept of leadership has been around for decades. As organizations seek more agility in their business a new discussion with new models and theories are emerging around the concept of agile leadership. So what then does 'agile leadership' mean? And why do we need another model for leadership?
This in an invitation to a join a generative dialogue on agile leadership. A conversation without sides that will explore questions like:
  • What do we mean by agile leadership? What's important about it?
  • Do we really need another leadership model?
  • Might this be a 'not invented here' syndrome or is this the calling forward of a new movement?
  • What's the conversation we're not having about leadership?
  • What are we in search of when we ask for agile leadership? What might be underneath this request?
  • What's the role that leadership will play in taking the agile movement to the next level?

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Presidio 1 & 2

10:45

Verbal Agility -- Facilitation Tips & Techniques (Michele Sliger, Erika Lenz)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
While traditional projects expect most communication to take the forms of email and manager-led meetings, agile projects expect teams to self-organize, collaborate and participate in decision-making. But what is self-organization? How does it work? This workshop will give participants the chance to practice a variety of facilitation techniques in a safe and fun setting. We'll focus on what it means to self-organize, how it occurs and how to help it along through inquiry and facilitation, and the hurdles that must be cleared in the process. Understand that professional facilitation is a dynamic activity designed to assist teams in decision-making without stepping in to decide for them. See how the proper use of facilitation in agile meetings can be a key driver in the development of high-performing self-organizing teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Understand what is meant by “self-organization” and how it occurs in teams
  • • Look at the art of listening in a new way and appreciate its importance in facilitation
  • • Experience examples of facilitation in use in agile meetings and take these techniques back to your teams
  • • Leave with a toolkit of verbal and physical cues and responses to use as part of conflict resolution and crucial conversations

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michele Sliger

Michele Sliger

President, Sliger Consulting, Inc.
Agile trainer and consultant; based in Denver, CO.


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego C

10:45

SESSION FULL: T-minus 10… 9… 8… We have lift-off! (Angie Doyle, Talia Lancaster)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Getting new teams to work together is hard. Really. Hard.
Is it because there is so much hype around new Agile teams? Or is it because there is such a focus on “doing things right” (or “doing” Agile right), that we forget about the people actually doing the work? Regardless of the reason, before we can change the way people work... we need to focus on the things that are important for teamwork to work!
We believe that the key to high-performance teams is creating an intentional culture that respects and embraces diversity - whether it be race, gender, class, culture, age, beliefs, language, skills or background. So join us as we explore the Team Canvas – sort of like a Business Model Canvas for teamwork - covering nine essential teamwork elements:
  • Purpose - Why we are doing what we are doing?
  • People & Roles - What are our names, roles and responsibilities?
  • Common goals - What do we as a group want to achieve together?
  • Personal goals - What do I as an individual want to achieve?
  • Team values - What do we really stand for and believe in?
  • Needs and expectations - What do each of us need to be successful in a diverse team?
  • Rules & Activities - How do we communicate and keep everyone up to date?
  • Strengths & Assets - What skills do we have in the team?
  • Weaknesses & Risks - What are the weaknesses we have, as an individual and as a team?
We will walk through our agenda for team lift-offs, facilitation posters and preparation work required, materials needed, and facilitation tips and tricks. All packaged in a handy pocket guide, that you can use to explore tried and tested techniques for each essential element. We will also have an opportunity to practice some of these techniques during the session.
Get ready to lift-off your team in T-minus 10... 9... 8...

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn facilitation techniques that will instantly help you in your role as a facilitator or Scrum Master.
  • Stop unproductive team conflict before it starts, by discussing things that matter to the team BEFORE they start working together.
  • Get everyone on to the same page. Fast!
  • Understand the essential elements to make teamwork work.
  • How to use the Team Canvas to create an intentional team culture that respects and embraces diversity.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angie Doyle

Angie Doyle

Agile Coach and Trainer, IQbusiness
Prior to becoming a consultant, I worked in the business process outsourcing industry where I pursued ways to make businesses more effective, more efficient and more capable of adapting to an ever-changing environment. So when I was introduced to Agile a few years later, it was a... Read More →
avatar for Talia Lancaster

Talia Lancaster

Agile Consultant, IQ Business
I have always been a “compulsive note-taker”. In meetings, training and conferences I have always used this as a way to concentrate and understand certain topics. Over the years this doodling has evolved into more of a visual note-taking technique, or sketchnoting. | | I... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina G

10:45

The customer is not always right -- and neither are you! (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
That old mantra of "the customer is always right" isn't always accurate. On the contrary, assuming Product Owners/Managers are customer proxies who wholly know the customer does not work either. This session explores what can happen when we give the customer OR Product Owner too much power over what we're building. You guessed it - we build the WRONG thing.
In this session we put on our statistics and science caps to look at customer feedback data and form experiments to understand our customers. You will hear stories about how asking the customer what they wanted pointed us to an overly specific solution that was not sellable or representative of the customer whole. Think about any time you are asked to give feedback as a customer - you usually only do when you really like or really hate something; we're missing the whole bulk of customer's feedback - the middle! On the other side of the coin, you will see how our own biases can forced us down a bad path even when we're looking at data that looks promising! It's like clicking on that first Google search result that matches your query while ignoring the others that don't. These simple examples are extrapolated when we're spending lots of money developing a feedback specific solution and we're looking at non-representative, biased feedback!
Join Natalie to dive into how to better utilize the scientific method to write hypotheses to narrow down options using the concept of set-based design (that you don't have to be a designer to understand). Find out how to run tests and use real data measurement generated from your hypotheses to understand what design set direction your product should try next. After all, interpreting the real data is much better than assuming you OR the customer know best so we can move to building the right thing as we learn the right thing.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to explain, understand, and utilize set-based design to maximize options
  • Design experiments and hypotheses to test and narrow down design options using real data
  • Identify research bias and customer bias in real data trends to protect your product from an expensive wrong turn


Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Sr Agile Consultant, Natalie Warnert LLC
Natalie Warnert is the primary founder of the Women in Agile initiative, which enables, empowers, and expands the distribution of new and diverse ideas in the agile and technology communities worldwide. She is a frequent speaker on business and agile topics including product strategy... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina E

10:45

Your User Stories Are Too Big! (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Product owners often struggle to translate their big ideas into small user stories that the team can deliver in a short period of time. When a user story is too big, it is harder to understand, estimate, and implement successfully. This experiential session will give you hands-on experience with 4 simple techniques to split the large stories in your backlog into smaller stories. While there are many additional techniques, this set of four has proven itself sufficient to split virtually any big story into smaller stories. You will work in small teams, applying each of the techniques to break some big user stories into smaller user stories.

Learning Outcomes:
  • After completing this workshop, participants will be able to split large stories into smaller, more specific stories using:
  • - Conjunctions and connector words
  • - Generic terms
  • - Acceptance criteria
  • - Timeline analysis


Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

10:45

Microservices vs Monoliths: Finding the Right Size For Services (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Do you have a monolith and want to break it into microservices? Do you have a microservice architecture and are finding yourself coordinating eight deployments at once all the time? Finding the right size for services can be hard. This presentation will explore the good and the bad of both architectures and will explore strategies, tools and examples to find the right size for your systems. Topics covered include:
  • Identifying the strengths and weaknesses of monolithic and microservice patterns
  • Developing strategies for identifying code that needs to coexist vs code that can be split
  • Developing strategies for physically isolating and packaging code
  • Exploring options for deployment of code into either a monolith or microservice environment

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the advantages and disadvantages of microservices and monoliths (yes monoliths have some pretty big advantages) and will learn strategies for maximizing both through the lifecycle of a project.


Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Lead Product Engineer, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include architecture, security, application usability, CI... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Cardiff/Carlsbad

10:45

AppSec in a DevOps World (Peter Chestna)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Security has typically been done at the end of the development cycle if it’s done at all. This has all of the same side effects as testing quality just before shipping, namely surfacing work and risk at the worst possible time. DevOps is forcing development teams to re-think their accountability. Not only are they responsible for functional quality but now they must also operationalize their software. I assert that they should also be accountable for security. They should treat security findings as equal citizens to their functional defects. Software written without security in mind opens a company up to brand damage and the costs associated with breaches. This will reflect directly on the teams that built the software.
How can DevOps teams add security to DevOps without losing velocity? In this session, Peter Chestna, Director of Developer Engagement, discusses how security is typically bolted on to the development process as well as the pressures on DevOps teams. He will then provide practical strategies to integrate security successfully into the SDLC while maintaining the velocity necessary to realize the benefits of DevOps.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Why application security (AppSec) is important
  • 2. Why traditional approaches don’t work
  • 3. How to add security into DevOps while maintaining velocity
  • 4. What to measure as leading indicators of success

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Peter Chestna

Peter Chestna

Contributing Editor, DevOps.com
Pete Chestna has more than 25 years of experience developing software and leading development teams, and has been granted three patents. Pete has been developing web applications since 1996, including one of the first applications to be delivered through a web interface. He led his... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina F

10:45

A Meta-Modern Framework for Agile Organizational Transformations: Integral Agile Framework (Michael Spayd, Michele Madore)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Which framework should we use for enterprise agility? How do we change the culture? Why don't our leaders get Agile? These are some of the questions you may be confronting as you try to shift from a few teams doing Agile, to your whole organization adopting the practices and mindset. The Integral Agile Transformation Framework (IATF) has been developed, and taught over the past 5 years to guide leaders and practitioners in answering these questions in a way that is both illuminating, and that facilitates strategic decisions & action.
Michael Spayd & Michele Madore -- co-founders of Trans4mation and co-authors of the forthcoming book The Integral Agile Transformation Framework -- will walk through the four quadrants of the completely updated IATF, from Leadership to Practices to Culture to Structure. The talk will illuminate what is required of leaders in an Agile world, how and when culture can (or cannot) be changed, the evolution of product innovation -- from Henry Ford to Society-centric approaches -- and the latest thinking in organization structure, termed meta-modern architecture.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To understand what an Integral approach is and how it can help you avoid dead-end implementation paths and approaches that will not work in your culture.
  • To understand the utility of the *Integral Agile Transformation Framework*, and how it can be used to usefully compare two or more methodologies, frameworks, approaches or processes to each other, and what each is especially good at doing.
  • To gain insight into what it takes to make progress towards full organizational agility (Integral Agility), exploring all four spheres: Leadership, Culture, Structure, and Practices.


Speakers
avatar for Michele Madore

Michele Madore

Co-Founder, Managing Partner, Trans4mation
My passion is just to be an instrument of real change. My company is Trans4mation, and what I know is that transformational type change lives in our hearts, minds, and habits, individually and collectively. The future of our organizations and our world is really about learning how... Read More →
avatar for Michael Spayd

Michael Spayd

Co-Founder, Managing Partner, Trans4mation, LLC
I am all about transformation, personal, organizational, systems. I am co-authoring a book entitled Transformation! Using the Integral Agile Transformation Framework to Achieve Breakthrough Results. I am the co-founder -- with Michele Madore -- of Trans4mation, LLC, who's mission... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 9

10:45

From Food to the Fed: Quickly and Safely Create and Scale Your Company's Internal Agility (Denise Wolf-Hill, Corey King)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Adoption and scaling of Agile is integral to achieving your strategic business objectives. However, you’ve hit a barrier: you can’t afford to hire Coaches or ScrumMasters; or maybe you hired coaches to stand up teams only to find that agility did not stick; or perhaps you simply do not know where to start.
Do not give up! Agile Coaches Denise Wolf-Hill and Corey King will share how they helped position two dissimilar organizations for long-term success by establishing an in-house Coaches/ScrumMasters development program. They will offer materials and lessons that you can take home and immediately apply to your adoption and scaling efforts.
If your organization is willing to commit to developing in-house agility, you do not want to miss this session!

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to get started with this cost-effective and impactful approach at your organization
  • Define critical success factors such as the role of executives, the need for Organizational Change Management, and selecting the right catalysts
  • Learn how to jump start the “people part” of transformations, and why that matters short- and long-term
  • Make your transformation sticky, pervasive, and long-lasting with a coaches’ cohort
  • Facilitate adoption/scaling of Agile using your Agile CoE/Transformation Office


Speakers
avatar for Corey King

Corey King

Lean-Agile Coach, Deloitte Consulting
As a transformation leader, I help others discover how to escape chaos and achieve tangible results. My toolbox includes Agile, Business Model Transformation, Lean and Organizational Change Management. At Deloitte, I coach and consult on Agile frameworks, Lean and business agility... Read More →
avatar for Denise Wolf-Hill

Denise Wolf-Hill

Agile Coach, Deloitte Consulting
agile coaching, taking agile to places outside of IT, caving, travel, SciFi and Fantasy


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 5

10:45

Creating Trust & Psychological Safety: How to Lead with Humble Inquiry (Paul Boos)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What happens after we give people a vision for change? We explained the business results we want to see and they bought into it, why aren’t we seeing the behaviors we expect?
As leaders, particularly leaders of change, we want our people to do the right things. This comes from giving them trust and in turn this helps create psychological safety. So how do these things work together? And how can we use Humble Inquiry to build this trust and safety?
This workshop will help you find the answers and give you some models and techniques you can use when building trust and safety in your organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the relationship between trust and psychological safety
  • Understand how humble inquiry can be used to build trust and create psychological safety
  • Develop a way of formulating questions around the 3 views of business results, team/org behaviors, and leader behaviors; this technique gives you a structure for the questions you will need
  • Some short practice constructing some humble inquiry questions

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Boos

Paul Boos

IT Executive Coach, Excella Consulting
Paul is an IT Executive Coach with Excella Consulting helping managers and teams improve their game. He focuses on pragmatic ways Agile, Lean, and leadership techniques can applied to make organizations more effective. Paul has led small teams to large groups as a development manager... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

10:45

Knowledge Consumption Velocity (Justin Beall)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
There is an adage, "if you don't measure, you don't care".
As knowledge workers, we value learning; therefore, it should be measured.
Learning is achieved through the consumption of knowledge.
Knowledge comes in various forms, can be abstract, and the value is subjective to individual measurement.
Let's first discover ways we all can amplify our ability to learn.
Distill the consumption of knowledge into a single metric, Knowledge Consumption Velocity.
Then, discuss social journaling and the measurement of those activities.
Finally, the visualization of this metric can be used as a badge of mastery over a given topic.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how creative/knowledge work is non-linear
  • Identify various types of learning experiences
  • Tips to help increase learning effectiveness
  • How to use social journaling to measure professional growth
  • How to apply Knowledge Consumption Velocity to professional life


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 6

10:45

Agile and Lean Roadmapping: Incorporating Change at Every Level of Product Planning (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many teams and organizations plan for anywhere from a quarter to years before the teams can deliver anything. That planning creates the illusion that the organization knows what the products will be and the value those products will deliver for the organization. The problem is that the more valuable (and often riskier) the product, the more we need resilience and feedback in product planning. Instead of big planning, especially up front, consider using smaller and continual planning that incorporates feedback.
When quarterly planning works, it’s terrific. However, too often it doesn’t work because our assumptions don’t hold:
  • We assume each feature set has an even distribution of features compared to other feature sets.
  • We assume each feature set has a similar value. We also assume the features inside the feature sets have similar values.
  • We assume that features arrive at a predictable rate and that we understand that arrival rate.
  • We assume teams can estimate what they can complete in one quarter.
  • We assume we don’t need to change what the teams estimated and committed to for one quarter.
Agile approaches allow us to complete small features, assess them and our process, and take the next feature off the backlog. What if we were able to generate the big-picture vision for the product, and yet be able to change what the teams work on next, as often as every day? We might have the best possible approach to product planning and delivery. That’s why using agile and lean roadmapping works so well for products that take three months or more to deliver.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Differentiate roadmap and product planning.
  • Appreciate how rolling wave planning can help managers and teams see the plan and the roadmap.
  • Identify how lean roadmapping can prevent the five assumptions too many managers have about products.
  • Recognize how the ideas of MMF, MVE, and MVP intersect and help the teams increase their delivery of small value.
  • Determine how to manage the management's desire for commitments.
  • Appreciate how the product value team provides guidance for the product and prevents interdependencies.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego A

10:45

Ask Us Almost Anything - Ron and Chet (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)

Abstract:
Ron and Chet wax more or less eloquently on what ever is on your minds.
Our main interests revolve around team-level aspects of Agile delivery: as Kent Beck once put it, making the world safe for programmers. We're convinced that regular delivery of running tested software is a key component of success in any would-be Agile situation. We're concerned about what we call "Dark Agile" or "Dark Scrum", the kinds of in-name-only "Agile" that sometimes arises. So if your questions are about those things, that'll be great.
On the other hand, if something else is on your mind, we'll try to talk about it ... even if we don't know anything. Unless we decide to turn the tables and make you answer your own question.
Come along and see what happens!

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked
  • - excitement about building software
  • - ideas for avoiding trouble in a "Dark Agile" situation


Speakers
avatar for Chet Hendrickson

Chet Hendrickson

Supreme and Ultimate Hyper-Chairman Emeritus, HendricksonXP
RJ

Ron Jeffries

RonJeffries.com


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

10:45

Gamification of software testing - a bit of fun, or a valuable endeavour? (Nicola Sedgwick)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
You’re in a test team, you work on test projects and for your work you receive a wage and maybe bonuses, promotions and other benefits. So why gamify? Sometimes it’s just about bringing some new energy to a team or for a team bonding session. However, sometimes it's about needing to arrange gamification is useful for incentivising non-testing colleagues to feed back on new developments (anyone can have a valid point of view) as well as directing the efforts of outsourced teams.
This workshop will cover:
  • Current uses of gamification in the crowd-sourced testing world (15 mins)
  • [Exercise] Gamifying a testing mission(15 mins)
  • [Discussion] How to spot “gamers” and reduce any negative impact by supporting, thwarting, encouraging or utilising their skills (10 mins)
  • [Exercise] Gaming the system (15 mins)
  • [Discussion] Real life application of ideas and techniques (10 mins)
  • Wrap up & questions (10 mins)

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Testers have specialist skills but can utilise non-testers, or remote testers, to help with testing tasks
  • 2. Using non-testers, or remote testers, to help with testing requires careful planning, incentivisation and support
  • 3. Properly incentivised helpers can enhance and improve the testing process
  • 4. Framework that can be taken into the workplace and used to start gamifying straight away
  • 5. How non-testing colleagues are involved in testing activities they gain added respect for the work that testers do


Speakers
avatar for Nicola Sedgwick

Nicola Sedgwick

CTO wannabe, Team Glue and mindful Leader/Coach, Independent Consultant
Avid enthusiast of agile ways of working who loves the way technology can enhance and transform the world around us.• Passionate about Agile working and Behaviour Driven Development• Effective, diplomatic, realistic and hands-on Technical Leader• Context driven in all activities... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Balboa/Mission Hills

10:45

Welcome the new digital Agile team member, Scrum Master's be aware !! (Jeffson Dsouza, Raghavendra Meharwade)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Applying Agile is a mindset change rather than a process change as compared to traditional methods. Some of the typical challenges faced by teams in the Industry while practicing Agile are:
• Limited experience with agile
• Slowing down of work due to limited access to Product Owner
• Incomplete\less detailed user stories leading to high onshore dependency
• Struggle to keep momentum with continuous churn of agile events through active participation and to maintain quality of artifacts (backlog, burndown, impediment list, retrospective action log)
These challenges manifold when delivery teams within the Industry are practicing distributed agile at scale. In the last couple of years within the IT industry we are seeing the infusion of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The question which come up is, Can AI help to address some of the above challenges?
At Accenture, we have introduced virtual Scrum Master that resides in our intelligent automation platform, Accenture myWizard®; The virtual Scrum Master uses set of AI technologies to collaborate with their human co-workers to help address above mentioned challenges. It monitors numerous aspects of Agile development projects—consisting of requirements, releases, metrics and resources—alerting the team of any potential issues and providing possible solutions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • We will like to share on how Virtual Scrum Master has helped teams on the following aspects of Agile product development:
  • *Identify and automate repetitive Agile tasks.
  • *Gain insights to effectively drive Agile ceremonies, and create quality deliverables.
  • *Use historical information to predict the future and take corrective measures when needed.
  • *Analyze patterns/relations/co-relations of historical and transactional project data to diagnose root causes
  • *Drive standardization of Agile practices while scaling in a distributed fashion
  • But then it’s not been hunky dory all the time, we are facing some tough questions from the Agile teams about taking risk of going against one of core value of Agile – Individuals and Interactions Over processes and tools! Are we trying to build AI agents which will take over Scrum Master jobs?
  • We will like to talk about our perspective on this. We believe that AI in Agile will not replace the collaboration between and within the teams but augment it to the next level where Scrum Master and Machine work together to achieve continuous improvement.
  • In this session, we will share a case study where we have implemented the virtual Scrum Master to gain efficiency within a distributed Agile team.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeffson Dsouza

Jeffson Dsouza

Accenture
Associate Director at Accenture, Jeffson brings with him 19+ years of software industry experience to his role as Agile Community of Practice Lead at Accenture. He has expertise in adopting Agile and Lean in various organizations.
avatar for Raghavendra Meharwade

Raghavendra Meharwade

Manager, Accenture Solutions Private Limited
Raghavendra (Raghu) is graduated from Karnatak University and has a diploma in advanced computing from C-DAC. Raghu has worked as developer, tester, Business Analyst, Project Manager, Scrum master & Agile coach in domains such as telecom, insurance and banking. Raghu is currently... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

10:45

Design Thinking Powered by Improvisation for Product Development (April Jefferson, Scott Showalter)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The power of design thinking with improvisation is explored in this fast paced and laughter filled experience. This is a no decks learning experience that could enhance how you ideate, collaborate, create, learn, design, and innovate. We will leverage problems you would like to solve whether routine or wacky.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to spark creativity
  • How to design with loose requirements
  • How to collaborate and co-create
  • Value of feedback driven design


Speakers
avatar for April Jefferson

April Jefferson

Organizational Change Coach, Live with Design / April Jefferson Corp
Coach, consultant, and speaker who enjoys helping organizations, executives, management, teams, and individuals on their journey to create awesome solutions and positive organizational cultures by leveraging agile, lean, and design thinking for their portfolios and programs. Enthusiastic... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

11:30

Learning to Experiment (Christopher Lucian)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Learning to Experiment
The best organizational changes in my career have happened as a result of emergencies. Support for the process of experimentation only seems to become enabled whenever the status quo has completely broken down. In those moments of crisis rebuilding with better has been possible, but why do we wait? In this report I share our experiences with experimentation at Hunter and encourage you to develop a culture of continuous improvement and continuous experimentation that will get you to where you want to be without having to be in a crisis mode.
Today I am the director of a new software development department and we continue to utilize Mob Programming as well as many other practices. This report is about my journey through software development and specifically the experiences I have had with the process of software estimation. We are currently a department of 27 with 6 full time mobs; each team does not estimate software but instead practices pure Kanban and delivers vertical slices of software daily. Hunter is not the first place I had dropped the practice of software estimation for a project. Back in 2007 I was working in an Environmental Chemistry and Military Contracting organization that had a more traditional waterfall environment. During that time, we created a Gantt chart of how each project would go until one day there was an emergency that prompted us to do things slightly differently. I have come a long way and experienced many iterative steps through my software development journey. Let’s start with where we are today and work our way back discussing practices and insights we discovered on the way.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Experiment with process and technical direction now, don't wait until it is too late.
  • Emergencies can give you space to experiment when things are dire.
  • Artificial constraints like estimation can get in the way of your team developing their skills.
  • Dedicated learning time for a team is a prerequisite.



Monday August 6, 2018 11:30 - 12:00
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Monday August 6, 2018 12:00 - 14:00
Pacific Ballroom

12:00

Sponsor Exhibits

Abstract:
Sponsors are an important element of the Agile2018 Conference. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in the Pacific Ballroom at Agile2018.

Monday August 6, 2018 12:00 - 15:45
Pacific Ballroom

13:00

Agile Advice

Abstract:
We all need advice from time to time, and having someone to bounce ideas off or share their thoughts can lead to great insights and uncover creative personalized solutions. At Agile2018, we are excited to provide Agile Advice as an offering tailored for you to bring your toughest questions, your biggest puzzles, and your worst hurdles.

Agile Advice is a 20 minute one-on-one conversation with an expert ready to offer their time and insight to those that are looking for a bit of advice. This diverse group of experts will be ready to chat about a wide range of agile topics such as culture, training, engineering, frameworks and leadership. Make sure to stop by and sign up for actionable advice on your Agile journey.

Monday August 6, 2018 13:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

14:00

SESSION FULL: The power of three: the journey of an Agile Leadership Team (Nienke Alma)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
It’s 2015, and ING Bank is about to start an exciting transformation. A new Agile Way of Working is introduced for the entire domestic bank in the Netherlands. The Way of Working also requires a challenging cultural change. Delivery goals and delivery approach are no longer directed top down. Feature teams that are formed everywhere in the organization have to learn how to deal with a much larger set of responsibilities. Fortunately they are not alone: there’s a new Agile Leadership team that provides guidance, helps them to develop craftsmanship and shows how to deal with their autonomy in an Agile organization. This Agile leadership team is the “POCLAC”.
In the new organization, the Product Owner, Chapter Lead and Agile Coach form a virtual team supporting the Purpose, Mastery and Autonomy of the feature teams. Each role has its own focus area, but together they share one goal: making sure the feature teams can flourish. That all may sound easy, but the reality is very different. How do you make sure these three roles truly collaborate? Which conditions should be created to make this work? And how do you prevent this virtual team from being perceived as a traditional management team by their environment?
In this talk we will follow the journey of one POCLAC during the past two years. We will see how people with very different backgrounds explore their common grounds in the first meetings. We will look back at the ups and downs, while we will learn that good intentions not always lead to the greatest results. For sure it has been a bumpy road, but there’s a lot to be proud of today. This POCLAC has become a leadership team that is widely recognized for the example they give of the mindset and behaviour needed in an Agile culture.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • We have learned how the responsibilities between POCLAC members should be divided
  • We have learned how the structure of POCLAC meetings influences the impact of the POCLAC on the feature teams
  • We have learned which behaviour in the Agile Leadership team supports the performance of the feature teams and which behaviour is counterproductive
  • We have learned how important it is for an Agile Leadership team to respect the autonomy of the feature teams
  • We have learned that the autonomy of the feature teams impacts the expectations that the feature teams have of the role of the POCLAC

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 10 years of experience as tester, test manager, Scrum Master, Agile trainer and coach. She is currently employed as an Agile Coach at ING Bank in the Netherlands. | | She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting the best... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 14:30
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

14:00

Hunting for Diamonds: Hiring the Very Best for Your Agile Team (Jeffrey Davidson, Jo Avent)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
"Where do we find great people?" It sounds like a simple question, but it means a whole bunch more.
How do we hire great people? What goes in a good job description? How do you review résumés? Should we have pre-tests? What about trick questions? Who should interview and for how long and what kind of interview is it and, oh my gosh, how do we even interview people properly? What should we evaluate candidates against? How do we know they will fit? What if we make a bad hire? How much time will it take? How do we help new team members succeed?
ARGH!
Hiring isn't harder than coding, but it's a lot more complicated than picking where to have lunch. Come to this interactive presentation to learn about a hiring process that was part of building a world-class team. Along the way we will talk about all the elements, how they fit together, what might be changed, and how you can apply these steps to your organization.
If you are ready to answer these questions and find the very best for your team (whether technical or not), attend Hunting for Diamonds!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand what's needed before the job description is posted
  • Observe a step-by-step process for hiring
  • Compare & contrast your hiring process to what other organizations are doing

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jo Avent

Jo Avent

Co-Founder, TalentWall
Jo believes hiring is a team sport and is particularly interested in diversity, hiring for potential, and applying agile methods to Talent Acquisition teams. When she's not doing that she's mostly making up puns.
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Founder, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 8

14:00

Creating an Environment for Successful Agile Teams (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Some teams seem to have some mysterious chemistry from the beginning. Other teams wallow, bicker, and slog their way to uncertain results. What makes one team soar, and another stumble? It's not just chance.
In this session, you'll experience what it's like to work on a team that is set up for success--or one that starts with the deck stacked against them. We'll explore the essential ingredients that result in that mysterious "chemistry." For example, we’ll examine the prerequisites for cohesion, and factors that pull teams apart. We'll look at myths and realities of software teams.
You'll gain tools to assess your agile team, and insights on how to adapt the environment for growing great teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the essential elements for great teams.
  • Strategies to adapt the environment to improve the chance of team success.
  • Identify common pitfalls for agile teams.


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina D

14:00

Shifting Diversity Through to Inclusion: What Part Does My Privilege Play? (Steve Holyer, Cara Turner)

Abstract:
As advancing Agile practitioners, we all know Agile culture must hold space for diversity, but what about inclusion? How important is it? Why is it so hard? How can privileged salonnieres be effective allies to those who lack the privilege we have within our agile teams and companies?
We want to take a topic that seems safe, "everyone at this level of Agile practice knows inclusion is important," and show how that statement can ring hollow in practice.
Look at how much work each of us—especially us—still has to do. In this session, we want to create a real challenge to say, "we're not always as 'right' and 'inclusive' and allied about this as we think we are." There is so much we haven't even bothered yet to learn.
Our failure to create safety for all voices, to put it simply and bluntly, is keeping us from discovering the true future and abundance of Agile.
This salon explores ways of being an Ally, working from our existing stories, to extend abundance and inclusion in our agile environments—especially when it is very hard.

Notes On Safety
We are inviting new ideas to emerge that challenge the core beliefs of people accustomed to being included. That will be uncomfortable to us in many unaccustomed ways.
  • We will not promise you safety—or a safe space—if you come, as we do, from a place of privilege.
    For once, we're going to ask you to explore spaces that are literally unsafe for the people who already inhabit them. To be their allies for inclusion, you will touch their space, and to do that you will have to leave your safety behind.
    We will provide a space that is safe to fail as well as some safety valves to release pressure as needed—we will not encourage you to harm others or violate the code of conduct.


  • If you are someone who comes from a space with less privilege in most agile environments, then you are someone with whom we are learning to ally ourselves.
    We imagine you may be called by this invitation to join our salon to observe, to monitor, or to share your lived experience. You are very welcome. We will endeavor to build safety for you. We will design an alliance with you during this salon so that you have a safer space to inhabit for our time together. In our designed alliance we will also endeavor to refrain from asking you to do the "heavy lifting" for us.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Agile PO Coach and Trainer, engage-results.com
Steve Holyer is a product ownership coach, trainer, facilitator and consultant helping product organisations unleash value and deliver results. Principal consultant at Steve Holyer and Associates in Zurich Switzerland; he is an international speaker and trainer on Scrum and Agile... Read More →
avatar for Cara Turner

Cara Turner

CEO & Agile Coach, codeX
Cara is the CEO and Agile Coach at Project codeX, an agile-first software training programme that equips aspiring coders with high quality skills and experience, while bridging the digital divide. | Having spent years helping teams adopt agile practices that reduce risk and increase... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Presidio 1 & 2

14:00

Everything I Learned About Agile Coaching, I Learned in Little League Baseball (Steven Granese)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does teaching a seven-year-old how to hit a baseball have to do with agile coaching? After coaching Little League for eight years, and agile teams for ten years, I thought I was an expert at both. Last year, while attending a New York Yankees coaching seminar, I quickly realized that I still had so much to learn. After struggling for fifteen minutes to teach a little boy how to hit, I heard a booming voice behind me. “You’re doing it wrong,” the Yankee instructor scolded. “Stop telling him what to do. Let him figure it out for himself. You’re his coach, not his babysitter!” Those words stopped me in my tracks. You’re his coach, not his babysitter. I knew instantly I would apply this advice to my agile coaching clients.
Rather than focusing on individual mechanics, the Yankees believe in coaching towards achieving outcomes that can be measured. For example, a typical Little League coach focuses on the “how” with advice like “get your elbow up” or “keep your head still”. In contrast, Yankees coaches focus on the “what” by instructing players to “hit the ball off that green sign” or “throw the ball into your teammate's glove”. Their approach allows players to learn the “how” at their own pace through self-discovery and experimentation, which allows for deeper learning and longer-lasting results.
The Yankees philosophy can be applied towards coaching agile teams. For example, rather than coaching Scrum teams to only improve their mechanics (i.e. complete a daily standup meeting in 15 minutes), I now help teams to achieve business outcomes (i.e. double the number of new subscribers). Focusing on outcomes frees teams to experiment with the mechanics that will help them deliver the results they want. This approach made me a better agile coach. I had less friction with my teams, and they achieved their desired results more quickly.
In this session, we will describe in detail the outcome-driven approach taught by the Yankees. We will teach baseball fundamentals to a few lucky volunteers, who will hit real baseballs off a “tee" and field ground balls. And we will demonstrate how to apply these concepts to make your agile teams more effective. We promise a fun and highly interactive session in which you will receive baseball instruction, but most importantly, you will learn how to become a more effective agile coach.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The bi-directional connection between practices and outcomes
  • The Yankees coaching model, which utilizes techniques like Inquiry, Engagement, and Extremes.
  • Why a focus on outcomes can be more effective than only teaching practices
  • Universal coaching strategies and techniques that can be applied across disciplines
  • Critical baseball skills, like hitting and fielding!

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steven Granese

Steven Granese

Vice President, Transform Practice, AgileThought
I am the VP of the Transform Practice at AgileThought, a software and consulting firm based in Tampa, FL. I lead a team of the top Agile, DevOps, and Product Coaches in the US. Talk to me about business transformations and leadership coaching.


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina F

14:00

Being Agile in a Remote Team (Shannon Ewan, Shane Hastie)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Although Agile principles and prominent frameworks advocate co-location, the realities of today's global business world often do not enable co-located teams. It would be a shame for organizations and teams to miss out on the power of Agility because of geographic circumstances. In many cases, organizations weigh the pros and cons of co-location vs. remote vs. blended configurations and determine that remote teams win the argument. ICAgile went through a similar dilemma earlier in its existence and chose the distributed model. Despite its challenges, it has brought us talent and an ability to interact with our global customers that a central office would not allow.
In this interactive session Shannon and Shane discuss their experiences working in a highly diverse, distributed, virtual organization which is founded on an Agile Mindset. The challenges of maintaining agility when remote, the ways the ICAgile team have consciously designed their team and organization culture and provide actionable advice based on real experience on how to maintain collaboration, teamwork and live the agile values in a remote only organization.
ICAgile is a global, virtual organization working with partners and members across over 100 countries spanning almost every timezone. The ICAgile team is spread across seven locations in three countries. We are a very diverse team with many different perspectives and viewpoints and have managed to build a strong collaborative culture and a truly safe working environment focused on outcomes rather than activities, holding each other to account and being really effective and productive while having a joyful workplace.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Contrast the pros and cons of working in distributed, co-located, or blended Agile teams.
  • Mindfully apply agile practices and tools that enhance collaboration and value-delivery for remote agile teams.
  • After seeing how one organization overcame the challenges of distribution to create a truly collaborative, agile culture, analogize some of these wins to their own context.
  • Identify and apply some of the key capabilities organizations need in order to succeed with remote teams (e.g. virtual facilitation skills).
  • Takeaway some additional resources to explore in their own context
  • Have some fun while learning

Attachments:

Speakers
SE

Shannon Ewan

Managing Director, ICAgile
Agile Coaching, Agile Transformation, Business Agility, ICAgile's learning and certification programs.
avatar for Shane Hastie

Shane Hastie

Director of Agile Learning Programs, ICAgile
Coach, trainer, passionate agilist from New Zealand | Director of Agile Learning Programs for ICAgile | Member of the Agile Alliance board 2011 - 2016. | Founding Chair of Agile Alliance New Zealand. | Lead Editor for Culture & Methods on InfoQ.com


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

14:00

Inspired Teams : Emotional Intelligence as a Performance Multiplier (Jorgen Hesselberg, Steven Wolff)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Creating an environment where teams thrive and perform can be challenging; the composition of the team may be off, communication tools get in the way and employee engagement scores across the industry are at historic lows. The good news is that there is science available to guide change leaders in increasing the chances of helping - rather than harming - teams towards high performance and finding inspiration in work. In this talk, one of the authors of the Harvard-published Team Emotional Intelligence (TEI) concept and an enterprise transformation coach with experience from Nokia, Intel, McAfee and Statoil explains the science behind TEI and Inspired Teams, detail the tangible business benefits that result from finding inspiration in work and provides practical guidance on how to get there.
We'll walk through use cases and illustrate how teams can achieve extraordinary results by building the competencies of Inspired Teams. At the end of this session, participants will understand how change leaders can create an environment where their teams can transcend high performance and become innovative and Inspired.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Understand the science behind Team Emotional Intelligence and Inspired Teams
  • - Identify the business impact of investing in creating a team environment conducive to performance
  • - Learn how to quantify the economic difference of high performing teams vs average teams
  • - Appreciate the subtle, yet critical "soft" factors affecting team relationships in a dynamic workplace
  • - Identify the four conditions essential to team performance and how to foster these in your own organization

Attachments:


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina G

14:00

Worm holes to product innovation: Fold your edges (Dhaval Panchal)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Innovation happens when you get into trouble. In this workshop we stretch linear thinking techniques of empathy maps, and story mapping by matching extreme case users to mundane goals. Product development normalizes end-users into familiar categories. No wonder most products look and feel generic. Ignore the middle, push to the edges. What-if! there was a worm-hole that you could ride to an alternative universe, where your users were remarkably unique in their needs. You will work in small teams to discover your product fitness to unique users, and in process discover innovative solutions for your typical users. Warning! to discover your innovative idea, be prepared to dip into uncertainty, embrace failure and celebrate learning.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Empathy for atypical users of a product helps to identify innovative ideas.
  • Innovations for majority of users needs deeper understanding of edge case users.
  • Workshop technique that participants can use in their work.
  • Participants that choose to work on their product may develop innovative ideas that they can take back.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dhaval Panchal

Dhaval Panchal

Founder / Agile Coach, Evolve Agility Inc.
Dhaval delivers world class Agile training that transforms my clients into rapid and highly efficient market leaders. He works with CTOs and heads of software development, engineering, DevOps, data & project management to: | | | Transform legacy waterfall approaches into efficient... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 6

14:00

FP vs. OOP: Beyond the Bikeshed (Colin Jones)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In object-oriented languages like Ruby, people often say that “everything is an object”—but first-class functions have become standard for object-oriented languages too. C# has had them and other related features for years, and even Java is in the game these days! Some “functional” languages seem to have some very object-oriented-looking features, too. If that sounds wrong to you, let's talk about polymorphism and more in languages like Clojure, Elixir, and even Haskell! So where does object-oriented programming (OOP) end and functional programming (FP) begin?
In this session, you’ll learn to look at these programming paradigms with a more critical eye, focusing on where FP and OOP folks fundamentally disagree, where these paradigms have more in common than the industry's rhetoric suggests, and how you can use those insights to make better decisions about the software you build.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Deeper understanding of the different emphases of the functional and object-oriented programming paradigms, and of the overlap between their respective language implementations.
  • Motivation to deconstruct arguments and technical solutions into their constituent parts.
  • More charitable approach when hearing other's technical perspectives & values.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Colin Jones

Colin Jones

CTO, 8th Light
Colin Jones is CTO at 8th Light, where he works with teams to craft reliable, maintainable software. He's into application performance, security, DevOps, architecture, and functional programming. He is the author of Mastering Clojure Macros (Pragmatic Press, 2014).


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

14:00

Linear Scalability of Teams: The Holy Grail of Agile Project Management (Jeff Sutherland)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Linear scalability of a large global project was noted for the first time in 2007 in a peer-reviewed paper by Victorov et al. (1) and subsequently by Systematic (2) and Xebia (3). This is in direct contrast to the findings of Fred Brooks in the "The Mythical Man-Month" (4) where developer productivity decreased as the number of people on a project increased leading to Brook's Law - "Adding people to a late project makes it later." Brooks asserts that this is due to exploding numbers of communications paths with more people. This phenomenon has been observed on 100% of non-Scrum software projects and for the majority of Scrum projects.
This talk will describe the history of how Scrum was used by Sutherland and Schwaber (5) across many companies leading up to the linearly scalable global project in 2007. Since then recent experience with Saab (6), Toyota, 3M, GE, transportation and oil companies, and other domains will be described. Codification of these experiences into a systematic way of deploying Scrum across domains, across organizations, and across the globe will be shared. The essentials for developing a "scale-free" organization architecture will be emphasized based on input from the Agile leaders of the largest known Scrum implementations at Intel and SAP.
Scale-free architectures are commonly seen in biological systems and Scrum is based on my experience with evolutionary biology as a principal investigator on NCI cancer research grants. For example, the internet is a scale free architecture as every node is like every other node with no extra bureaucracy introduced at higher levels that could break the internet. The experts at Intel have pointed out that putting billions of transistors on a chip requires the same mode of thinking and have reminded us that Scrum properly implemented must work the same way to be scalable.
Agile leaders interested in taking the performance of their collocated and distributed teams to the next level will find great value in this presentation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the background data on high performance scaled Scrum teams.
  • Understand how to scale agile teams and get linear increase in productivity while scaling up.
  • Pitfalls to avoid while scaling.
  • Why a "scale-free" architecture is critical to performance of scaled teams.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland

Founder and Chairman, Scrum, Inc.
CoCreator of Scrum


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego C

14:00

Show Me the Money! Defining Enterprise Value at Scale (Gail Ferreira)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Defining business value for product innovation is an essential and critical task used to obtain funding in enterprise environments. When Elon Musk obtained VC funding for Tesla, he used innovative business value modeling to make ruthless choices in his product offerings. How did he do this?
The following questions will be asked during the workshop:
  • What is your MVP?
  • What are your most innovative products?
  • What are your most valuable products and product lines?
  • Which products and product lines should be eliminated?
In this workshop, groups will be organized into scrum teams that will iterate in two sprints to create an innovation product backlog.
Learning Outcomes:
1.Understand MVP
2.Understand the value of product innovation
3.Understand the impact of product decisions
4.Identify and analyze business value factors
5.Evaluate product decisions
6.Create summary product worksheet

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand MVP
  • Understand the value of product innovation
  • Understand the impact of product decisions
  • Identify and analyze business value factors
  • Evaluate product decisions
  • Create summary product worksheet

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gail Ferreira

Gail Ferreira

Principal, Boston Consulting Group
Dr.Gail Ferreira is an accomplished senior executive, award winning author, and speaker with 25+ years of deep experience in lean and agile methodologies and consulting. Gail utilizes this experience to help organizations realize maximum value on their investments by leveraging agile... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 5

14:00

Lead Like a Multiplier (Mariya Breyter)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Would you like to dramatically improve your leadership skills? Do you love helping people find fulfillment in challenging work? Do you enjoy motivating and inspiring others? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this workshop is for you!
The concept of a leader in a modern agile environment is changing. This session is for anyone who is interested in developing and exhibiting new leadership skills within an agile ecosystem. It's practical and fun since it is gamified: through a series of interactive experiences, we will experience the qualities of "multipliers" - the leaders who create collaborative, self-organizing, and empowered organizations.
The workshop is based on the concept introduced by Liz Wiseman, vice president of Oracle University, in her book "Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter". In her book, Liz argues that leaders are either Multipliers or Diminishers:
Diminishers drain intelligence, energy, and capability from the people around them and always needs to be the smartest person in the room. These are the idea killers, the energy sappers, the diminishers of talent and commitment.
Multipliers use their intelligence to amplify the smarts and capabilities of the people around them. These are the leaders who inspire employees to stretch themselves to deliver results that surpass expectations. And the world needs more of them, especially now when leaders are expected to do more with less.
In a series of interactive games, participants will exhibit the "multiplier" leadership skills and define strategies of applying these skills to their daily leadership strategies. Each participant will leave the workshop equipped with a list of interactive games they will be able to use to promote leadership thinking in their companies.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Based on my prior experience, this workshop will be thought-provoking and transformative to its participants in the following way:
  • they will learn what leadership means in a modern agile organization
  • each of them will be able to assess their own leadership qualities as a multiplier or diminisher
  • they will define what it means to be a multiplier in the organization they are in
  • they will provide and receive feedback as leaders
  • in the end, everyone will receive a list of interactive games they will be able to use to promote leadership thinking in their companies

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mariya Breyter

Mariya Breyter

VP of Technology, Goldman Sachs
Business Transformation. Leadership. Self-organizing empowered teams.


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina E

14:00

Lean Leadership and Systems Thinking (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
This talk discusses the relationship between Lean Leadership and Systems thinking.
In Agile, the focus on self-organization, servant leadership, and self-motivation seems to make management unnecessary. The focus is on trust and respect.
Lean-thinking is based on leadership, systems-thinking, attending to time, a focus on quality and continuous improvement. Edwards Deming postulated that the system that people are in is responsible for 95%+ of the errors that occur. Although people are important, it is exactly because you can trust them and that they are self-motivated that the focus should be on creating a great environment in which they can thrive.
Creating such an environment requires management and a systems-thinking point of view. Russell Ackoff tells us that:
Systems Thinking is a mode of thought that begins with SYNTHESIS before ANALYSIS:
1) Identify the containing whole (system) of which the thing to be explained is part.
2) Explain the behavior or properties of the containing whole
3) Now, explain the behavior or properties of the thing to be explained in terms of its role(s) or function(s) within its containing whole.
Lean provides an holistic view for the work done in an organization. However, Agile is as much about culture as it is about process, perhaps more so. What if you don’t have an Agile ‘culture’? Is there anything that we can do about it? David Mann, in a paraphrase from “Creating a Lean Culture”, tells us:
Culture is important, but changing it directly is not possible. Culture is no more likely a target than the air we breathe. It is not something to target for change. Culture is an idea arising from experience.
That is, our idea of culture of a place or organization is a result of what we experience there. In this way a company’s culture is a result of how people collaborate with each other. Culture is critical, and to change it, you have to change your method of collaboration.
Focus on agreements, behaviors, specific expectations, tools and routine practices.
Lean systems make this easier because they emphasize explicitly defined agreements and use tools to make the work and agreements visible.
The role of the servant leader in Agile is to combine these two concepts of systems thinking and lean-management to improve the system on behalf of the people reporting to them. Our focus should be on creating great systems for self-motivated, trustworthy people.

Learning Outcomes:
  • the proper role of management in Agile
  • the challenges manager face
  • understanding the role of the servant leader as focusing on helping their charges while supporting the realization of business value
  • understanding why the system people are in greatly affects the way they behave
  • how to affect culture and manage transitions
  • the different aspects of an organization that need to be changed (e.g., social architecture vs operating architecture)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway

CEO, Net Objectives
Founder and CEO of Net Objectives.Co-founder of Lean-Kanban University (no longer affiliated). SPC Trainer. Co-author of 4 books on Lean, Scrum, Design Patterns and Agile Design. | Happy to talk to anyone who wants a free consult. | Also, are looking for folks who'd like to work... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego A

14:00

The Power of Curiosity, the Limits of Expertise, and the Danger of Earned Dogmatism (John Krewson)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Is cholesterol bad for you? Does flossing work? The answers to these questions seem to change with every new study. It can be frustrating to learn that what we once held to be true is now false, and vice versa. It's certainly better than the alternative; if we weren't curious enough to challenge our assumptions, we'd still be using leeches to suck the diseases out of our bodies. This is the perpetual cycle of the scientific community: challenge assumptions, retest, and learn. As much as we take this learning mindset to heart in the Agile community, sometimes we fall short in practice. As product owners, we put large batches of software into production without testing whether or not our customers want it. As coaches, we advise our customers to implement good practices that worked well a decade ago, without regard to better practices that have emerged in their place. Why do we do this? The answer might be found in the concept of Earned Dogmatism. The Earned Dogmatism Effect suggests that we become closed-minded and dogmatic in our thinking when we allow ourselves to be labeled as an expert in a field or domain. In this talk, John Krewson will offer several antidotes to Earned Dogmatism. Together, we'll challenge several closely held Agile assumptions, we'll investigate curiosity as an alternative to expertise, and we'll connect curiosity and a growth mindset to improving as agile coaches and product owners.

Learning Outcomes:
  • By the end of this session, attendees will be able to answer the following questions:
  • * What is Earned Dogmatism?
  • * How is my expertise hindering my ability to coach? To be a product owner?
  • * What are my own hidden assumptions?
  • * What is a growth mindset?
  • * How can curiosity enable a growth mindset?
  • * How can curiosity make me a better coach? A better product owner?


Speakers
avatar for John Krewson

John Krewson

President, Sketch Development
John Krewson is the founder and President of Sketch Development Services, a software development studio that provides Agile coaching, consulting and training. Sketch delivers software for its customers using Agile principles and practices, and helps other organizations with their... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

14:00

Projects Are Evil (David Hawks)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Someone once told me that a “project” is nothing more than a waterfall container that has a fixed date and a fixed scope. In this session, we will discuss the difference between a project mindset and a value driven mindset and how a project mindset may hold us back from delivering maximum value.
We will explore what we truly value and what common practices in our organizations are counter productive like budgets, control, push and output. We will explore concrete practices that you can immediately implement in order to make the shift away from from a project driven mindset to a value driven mindset. We will look at the impact of focusing on discovery, outcome, pull, trust, investing and continuous delivery have on executing projects and delivering products
This session is highly interactive where you will work in teams through a series of facilitated activities and discussions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand 3 ways projects hold us back from achieving max product success
  • The difference between a value-driven mindset and a project-driven mindset
  • 6 practices you can implement to support a value-driven mindset


Speakers
avatar for David Hawks

David Hawks

Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Velocity
David Hawks is a Certified Enterprise Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer who has played almost every role in product development: developer, architect, Scrum Master, manager, Product Owner, and executive. He has a background in building highly productive Agile teams and a passion for... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 9

14:00

Scaling Product Backlogs to All Levels of the Enterprise: What, Who and How? (Candase Hokanson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As companies roll out Agile to their entire enterprise, they often run into issues of scaling product ownership from the team level (with one team and one Product Owner[PO]) to the program or even portfolio level. Figuring out how to manage the product backlogs across the organization, especially in terms of dependencies, can be a monumental feat. Some of the questions that companies find themselves asking are: “How does the product backlog scale?” “Who should manage the backlog at each level?” and “What are some tools that POs at each level can use to manage their respective backlogs?”
In this talk, we'll have a guided discussion about some of the more popular approaches on the market for scaling product ownership for program and portfolio analysis, discuss some rules of thumb for how to scale the backlog and who should fill what roles and, finally, share how using visual models can help in understanding dependencies and value across all levels of the enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how major scaling methods scale the product backlog
  • Understand the main criteria for filling the PO type role at each level backlog
  • Understand how visual models and scale from product to program and portfolio backlog management.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Candase Hokanson

Candase Hokanson

Senior Product Manager, Seilevel
Candase Hokanson is a Senior Product Manager at Seilevel and a PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner who trains and Coaches, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, and business analysts on Agile approaches as well as championing products in those roles for clients. She works with teams to unite... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Balboa/Mission Hills

14:00

Ask Me Almost Anything - David Hussman (David Hussman)

Abstract:
David teaches and coaches product learning by blending discovery and delivery. He has spent the last 20 years coaching pragmatic agility and product learning for companies of all sizes around the world. David’s coaching is non-dogmatic and pragmatic. His focus on getting to know a project community allows him to seed self-discovery and avoid falling into the expert trap of simply telling people what they “should do". David spends most of his time with teams, helping them create and validate product ideas and road maps with learning outside the code with lean product tools as well as inside the code with responsive engineering. He also works with leadership teams to pragmatically introduce the type of lasting agility that fosters innovation and creates a competitive edge.
This is a conversation based session. I'm especially keen on discussing and answering questions regarding continuous product learning (Helping Teams and Companies Adopt a Product Approach). While the core topics are around product centered learning, all topics are welcome. Success could be measured by the number of people who leave on one or more concrete ideas they can immediately try, or one or more ideas that might help their community start thinking in earnest about adopting a product centered approach that blends learning from discovery as well as delivery.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, Edison's Head
David teaches and coaches continuous learning thru product discovery and iterative delivery. 20+ years of coaching product learning into eco-systems of all sizes and shapes around the world has shaped David’s non-dogmatic and pragmatic style. David spends most of his time working... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

14:00

Should testers participate in code reviews? (Seb Rose)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Peer review can be a major contributor to code quality, but the practice is usually ill-defined and excludes some team members who can make a huge difference - those whose focus is testing.
The orthodox reasoning is that, if someone doesn't have development expertise, then they will not have anything to contribute to a code review. This is wrong on several levels. Software should be easy to read, logically structured, with clear, comprehensible names - and the people who are best placed to notice when it isn't are those who won't focus on syntax and coding style. As well as contributing to the readability of the code, testers will gain early insight into areas of complexity or confusion, which is invaluable when making risk-based judgements about where additional testing is needed, whether automated, scripted, or exploratory.
In this highly interactive session, we’ll explore how and why team members with testing expertise should participate in the peer-review of development commits. We’ll dig into the positive impact this has on our products, our processes and our people. You’ll leave with concrete next steps, including a structured description of an inclusive peer-review process and a modified Definition of Done.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate that the value of peer review is far broader than simply code structure/layout/performance
  • Show how existing peer review approaches fail to promote collaboration or incorporate the experience of QA, to the detriment of the product
  • Explain how QA involvement in peer review can lead to better, risk-based decisions on additional test activities
  • Define a modified peer review process based on clear, role-specific guidance for reviewers and enumerate the benefits it offers, such as improved code readability and better collaboration within the team
  • Propose a revised Definition of Done, incorporating the modified peer review process

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. He first worked as a programmer in 1980 writing... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Cardiff/Carlsbad

14:00

Agile Organizations in the future: How we are moving there! (Andre Nascimento, Renato Willi)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
We've seen the presence of Agile growing in many non-IT industries. Now we know some cases in healthcare, recruiting, education, military, legal, wine production, nuclear plants and even things such as an Agile Marketing Manifesto.
That's a clear sign that Agile has demonstrated some success in its adoption in IT industry and now it's become mainstream, being part of executive and c-level conversations. But this fact raises some questions:
  • Is this really Agile what they're doing? Or is it Lean? Or just an abusive use of the buzzword?
  • Do we really understand what agile means and how to adopt it at other industries?
  • Why is this happening now and what are the tradeoffs on this phenomenon across the world?
  • How does it impact organizations, what we should be prepared for within the next few years?
  • What have we learned from our experiences of Agile beyond IT?
  • What are the next steps for the Agile organizations and how do future Agile organizations look like?
Those are some discussions we'd like to bring to consultants who want to work in this market and leaders from those non-IT industries in this talk, helping them to understand how an organization will adapt itself to be more Agile within the next years, and how Agile was adapted to work at those environments.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To learn and think on how Agile is shaping the organizations of the future and leading those organizations to deep transformation journeys
  • To have a clearly perspective on what should work and what shouldn't when it comes to an agile organization
  • Agile can work outside IT. As a matter of fact, it's a return to its origin
  • Agile/Lean are adequate ways of working with creative/knowledge work in today's and future's business environment. It enables collaboration, learning and sharing knowledge with scarce resources and professionals to achieve effectiveness
  • Agile is a means, not an end. Keep the values and principles, adapt the practices. Good approaches and practices for Agile beyond IT (Lessons for Consultants/Coaches)
  • Relevant impacts of Agile in organization's structures (roles, salaries, bonus, budgeting, governance) and culture (Lessons for Organizations Leadership)
  • Agile is not fit for repetitive/procedural work. Suspect when you see it there

Attachments:


Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

14:00

Business Agility Lab

Abstract:
Did you know that over half of Agile teams have issues with development and business people working together effectively? A core principle behind the Agile Manifesto is that they must do so daily throughout their project. Without adopting the Agile practice of daily collaboration, organizations struggle to deliver high customer value.

To address this, Agile Alliance will have a special area in the Agile Alliance Lounge: the Business Agility Lab. You’ll be able to participate in one of the widest retrospectives regarding understanding key positive and negative themes with Agile and business — the Narrative Project. You can add your voice by submitting a story or helping design experiments to amplify Agile principles inside your company.

Business leaders who understand the benefits of Agile will also be on hand to offer tips about improving your company’s Agile adoption process. Ray Arell (former Sr. Director at Intel), Heidi Musser (former VP & CIO at USAA), Hendrik Esser (VP at Ericson), and Steve Denning (former Director at World Bank) look forward to helping you!

The Business Agility Lab will be open Monday-Thursday from 10:30-16:30, with activities announced daily. We look forward to your participation!

Monday August 6, 2018 14:00 - 16:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

14:45

A Natural Servant Leader Unlocks the Power of Employees at a Global Contact Center (David Grabel, David Reichert)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you ever known a natural servant leader? We had the privilege of working with Serena Godfrey, VP of Customer Service for Vistaprint. She easily passes Robert Greenleaf’s best test for a natural servant leader - “Do those served grow as persons? Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?”
In this session, we will briefly share how, as a servant leader, she fundamentally transformed the work lives of 1,800 employees in a global contact center while delivering outstanding business results. She turned an unpleasant command and control environment into a self-organizing, Agile organization. Attendees will have a chance to meet and ask questions of Serena, members of her leadership team, and front-line employees who have traveled from their offices in Montego Bay, Jamaica.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • At the conclusion of this session, you will be able to:
  • Explain how servant leaders can improve the lives of their employees and enable those employees to deliver better business outcomes.
  • Apply the principles of servant leadership and Agile to elevate rote work into knowledge work.
  • Guide leaders who are not natural servant leaders on their journey towards becoming servant leaders.
  • Guide leaders in developing an organization with servant leadership at all levels.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Grabel

David Grabel

Enterprise Agile Coach, Eliassen
David Grabel is an enterprise agile coach at Vistaprint bringing Agile beyond engineering to the entire organization. He has introduced Scrum, Kanban, XP, and SAFe at both small and large organizations. As a consultant, his clients included Vistaprint, Trizetto, Bose, and PayPal where... Read More →
avatar for David Reichert

David Reichert

Agile Coach, Vistaprint
As an Agile Coach at Vistaprint, David assists key leaders in continuing the organization's Agile transformation through education, mentoring, professional coaching and facilitation. He has co-developed and co-delivered Agile leadership pathways which have helped leaders gain the... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 14:45 - 15:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

15:15

Afternoon Break

Afternoon Break

Monday August 6, 2018 15:15 - 15:45
All Foyers

15:45

"Soup or Salad" - Models of Diversity (Avraham Poupko)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Diversity is a multi-faceted and overloaded word. In this experience report I describe some of my own experiences with diversity along with some insights and musings. One of my main points is that diversity is great, but we need to go beyond the accepted types of diversity and find new (and diverse) ways of being diverse.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • If we want to reap the benefits of diversity we must understand the following:
  • 1. You do not get the benefits of having multiple views by compromising between the views. You get the benefit of multiple views by adopting the great parts of each view, or better yet by arriving at a new view.
  • 2. We need to think critically about what diversity is. If we are going to be dogmatic about diversity, we will loose a lot of what diversity has to offer.


Speakers
avatar for Avraham Poupko

Avraham Poupko

Senior System's Architect, L&T Technical Services
I am an Architect and leader of a group of Architects in L&T's Center of Excellence in Jerusalem. | I am fascinated by the ways by which people get together to create software. The idea of minds joining to create something "abstract" such as software is one of the great wonders... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 16:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

15:45

Alignment, achieved! Smoothing siloes with agile strategy articulation (Eric Willeke)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Success requires extreme alignment, an intense clarity of the intent and reasoning behind what truly matters for the organization, shared by everybody with a part to play in that success.
Failure to achieve this alignment exists in every organization I’ve encountered. The cost of poor alignment is staggering, leading to wasted efforts and duplicated work on a huge scale. The cost of forcing alignment through top-down techniques is equally wasteful, denying human potential, disempowering your workforce, and adding friction to every action performed in the enterprise. The strategies required to excel require bringing together many disparate perspectives drawn from your many functional silos and organizations, followed by well-aligned activity by hundreds or thousands of practitioners in every part of your company.
This talk addresses the core challenge head on: Senior leadership lacks the tools and approaches to effectively articulate the strategies they conceive, frequently failing to achieve clarity within their own leadership team, much less across their entire organization. We help senior leaders and their influencers explore the common symptoms resulting from poor articulation, discuss the application of one OKR-based approach to creating effective strategic clarity across many siloes, and explore how the resulting strategies are then deployed with alignment into typical agile implementations using the Scaled Agile Framework as an example. Groups applying these techniques have seen an immediate increase in the ability to coordinate across functions, as well as dramatically improved energy focused on the key tactics to advance the core company strategies.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize symptoms of poor alignment.
  • Facilitate leadership awareness of the challenge
  • Apply basic framing techniques using OKRs
  • Transition strategic intent into various functional organization


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 8

15:45

SESSION FULL: What kind of resources are your humans? Bringing an Agile touch to Human Resources (Biase De Gregorio, Angie Doyle)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Human Resources! The very nature of the word gets any Scrum Master or Agile Coach hot under the collar. Calling humans “resources” is the same as calling them a capital asset – like a vehicle or building. It’s not surprising that the term annoys us. After all, the term was first coined in 1893 by John R. Commons – around the same time that child labour was still legal! Sadly, many organisations still refer to people as "resources" today...
Luckily, Human Resources has started making huge strides since those dark days. They now focus on the things people care about - like hiring, compensation, performance management and training. But they are still playing “catch up” with our new agile ways of working. They are often blamed for not making changes needed to support an Agile culture, but Human Resources can’t change the company culture on their own! They often do not even know where to start…
We have found a great approach to help Human Resources find the humans behind the “resources” - using Agile values and principles as a guide. Join us as we go through techniques to help Human Resources (and other support functions) find answers the following questions:
  • What is our vision (as a support function) for the organisational Agile transformation?
  • What are the challenges and benefits facing us?
  • How will we know what we are doing is making a difference?
  • Who and what is affected?
  • What actions will we demonstrate (based on Agile values and principles) to support people through the change?
You will have the opportunity to learn practical techniques to answer each of these questions, as well as see examples of how we have used these techniques with Human Resources teams and other support services (e.g. Audit, Marketing, Finance, etc.).
It’s time for Agile to move outside software and product delivery – and into support services. It’s time to bring an Agile touch to Human Resources!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Help support functions (like Human Resources, Marketing, Finance, Audit, etc.) understand how to incorporate Agile values and principles into the work they do on a daily basis
  • Align on the vision for the Agile transformation within the support function, as well as identify whether the benefits are worth the effort of the change
  • Identify metrics for success
  • Know who and what is affected by the change

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angie Doyle

Angie Doyle

Agile Coach and Trainer, IQbusiness
Prior to becoming a consultant, I worked in the business process outsourcing industry where I pursued ways to make businesses more effective, more efficient and more capable of adapting to an ever-changing environment. So when I was introduced to Agile a few years later, it was a... Read More →
avatar for Biase De Gregorio

Biase De Gregorio

Executive Partner, IQbusiness
Passionate about people and delivery through Lean|Agile approaches, with a focus on creating awesome collaborative working environments. | As a Partner and head of the agility@IQ offering at IQ Business since 2012, I have built an amazing team of Agile consultants (largest in South... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Balboa/Mission Hills

15:45

SESSION FULL: Product Ownership, Explained (Richard Seroter)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is "product owner" just a role at software companies, or does every enterprise need them? What does this person actually "own"? How can you completely mess up the role and what does success look like? Product ownership is one of the most important pieces of a software team, and in this talk, we'll take a deep look at what it entails. Here, we'll talk about the job description, what makes a successful product owner, how to fail miserably (from personal experience!), and tips for creating the maximum impact in the role.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Role of the product owner
  • * Best ways they can contribute to their teams

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Seroter

Richard Seroter

Senior Director of Product, Pivotal
Richard Seroter is a Senior Director of Product at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also a Microsoft MVP for cloud, Pluralsight trainer, lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, frequent public speaker, and author of multiple... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina D

15:45

Shifting Diversity Through to Inclusion: What Part Does My Privilege Play? II (Steve Holyer, Cara Turner)

Abstract:
As advancing Agile practitioners, we all know Agile culture must hold space for diversity, but what about inclusion? How important is it? Why is it so hard? How can privileged salonnieres be effective allies to those who lack the privilege we have within our agile teams and companies?
We want to take a topic that seems safe, "everyone at this level of Agile practice knows inclusion is important," and show how that statement can ring hollow in practice.
Look at how much work each of us—especially us—still has to do. In this session, we want to create a real challenge to say, "we're not always as 'right' and 'inclusive' and allied about this as we think we are." There is so much we haven't even bothered yet to learn.
Our failure to create safety for all voices, to put it simply and bluntly, is keeping us from discovering the true future and abundance of Agile.
This salon explores ways of being an Ally, working from our existing stories, to extend abundance and inclusion in our agile environments—especially when it is very hard.

Notes On Safety
We are inviting new ideas to emerge that challenge the core beliefs of people accustomed to being included. That will be uncomfortable to us in many unaccustomed ways.
  • We will not promise you safety—or a safe space—if you come, as we do, from a place of privilege.
    For once, we're going to ask you to explore spaces that are literally unsafe for the people who already inhabit them. To be their allies for inclusion, you will touch their space, and to do that you will have to leave your safety behind.
    We will provide a space that is safe to fail as well as some safety valves to release pressure as needed—we will not encourage you to harm others or violate the code of conduct.


  • If you are someone who comes from a space with less privilege in most agile environments, then you are someone with whom we are learning to ally ourselves.
    We imagine you may be called by this invitation to join our salon to observe, to monitor, or to share your lived experience. You are very welcome. We will endeavor to build safety for you. We will design an alliance with you during this salon so that you have a safer space to inhabit for our time together. In our designed alliance we will also endeavor to refrain from asking you to do the "heavy lifting" for us.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Agile PO Coach and Trainer, engage-results.com
Steve Holyer is a product ownership coach, trainer, facilitator and consultant helping product organisations unleash value and deliver results. Principal consultant at Steve Holyer and Associates in Zurich Switzerland; he is an international speaker and trainer on Scrum and Agile... Read More →
avatar for Cara Turner

Cara Turner

CEO & Agile Coach, codeX
Cara is the CEO and Agile Coach at Project codeX, an agile-first software training programme that equips aspiring coders with high quality skills and experience, while bridging the digital divide. | Having spent years helping teams adopt agile practices that reduce risk and increase... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Presidio 1 & 2

15:45

Never Would I Ever! Examining Your Agile Non-negotiables (Jenny Tarwater, Laura Powers)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
NEVER would I EVER do what? What do you believe you would NEVER do in the world of agile? What do you think must ALWAYS be done? Words like NEVER, ALWAYS, MUST, and SHOULD mark the border of our beliefs and biases. As agile coaches and mentors, our professional beliefs and biases may collide with others, and sometimes we don't even realize what's happening until it's too late. We can't help our clients get beyond the limits of their beliefs and biases unless we're aware of our own.
Let's challenge our personal collections of agile never's, always, musts and should's. In other words - join us for an interactive session where we will play with our our agile non-negotiables. Using a new agile game adapted from the popular game "Never Would I Ever" - we will tap into the diversity of experience and beliefs of Agile2018 participants to examine circumstances where a NEVER might become an experiment in MAYBE. Along the way, we'll examine the "why" behind our own deeply held agile beliefs and practice the art of humble inquiry (the gentle art of asking) to better understand the perspective of others.
Never would you ever want to miss this session!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Clarify why you support a favorite practice.
  • Deconstruct bias in that support
  • Recognize that these recommendations are not binary
  • Generate criteria in which you would may recommend/use a practice you haven’t in the past.
  • Ability to use humble inquiry (the gentle art of asking, not telling)


Speakers
avatar for Jenny Tarwater

Jenny Tarwater

Agile Coach and Trainer, Blueshift Innovation


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

15:45

"A Close-up with Conflict" - Games to Transform Conflict into Collaboration!! (Pradeepa Narayanaswamy)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you been on a team where some fear conflict and see it as something to avoid? Perhaps a team member is unresponsive to e-mail requests. Maybe someone refuses to ask a teammate for help. It could be that people simply avoid each other. The danger is that the conflict festers under the surface and then bubbles up in unexpected ways. Conflict under the surface is disruptive. It fractures a team as people choose sides and try to build up their forces. It fosters competition, distrust, poor communication, and low productivity. What can you do to revert the huge cost acquired by conflict avoidance/ignorance that may result in turnover, absenteeism, stress related health problems?
Engaging in conflict doesn't have to be negative or counterproductive. In fact, it can be positive. In this high energy hands-on workshop, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy will take the attendees through various conflict resolution games that helps reveal real conflict along with emotions, personalities, misunderstandings, and reactions in a safe environment. The games will help the team become aware of and practice the characteristics & skills necessary to resolve or transform conflict. The audience will play games that helps build trust, improve emotional intelligence, enhance verbal and nonverbal communication, challenge assumptions, and appreciate diversity.
Use these games to empower your teams to search for collaborative solutions in conflict situations. Use these games to allow teams to experience the result of effectively transforming conflict into collaboration. Use these games to take your team from a group of individuals to a high-performing team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will
  • Learn various simple games to experience the conflict process in a fun, supportive environment that enables their team to create effective strategies and practice the skills necessary to resolve conflict.
  • Understand how the games can help build morale in their teams by providing context, taking control of the learning and making it fun & energetic.
  • Discover how the conflict resolution games can help team members learn to trust each other as they provide opportunities for sharing insights, emotions and experiences while developing solutions.

Attachments:

Speakers
PN

Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Agile and Life Coach, Possibilities- Lives Transformed LLC
As an Agile Coach, I am a self-proclaimed “Agile Passionista” who strongly believes in agile values & principles to help organizations delight their customers. I help teams and leaders understanding & aligning with their organizational vision and support in their transformation... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

15:45

Community-Driven Change (Shahin Sheidaei, Shawn Button)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Many organizations flatten management structure when they transform to agile. It soon becomes obvious that important activities done by managers are still needed. A community can fill these gaps. They can provide morale, governance, learning and mentorship, recruiting and hiring, mutual support, coordination, sharing, innovation and more!
Unfortunately few companies manage to create a strong communities. Even fewer empower their communities to fill these gaps. This means they are missing the ultimate benefit of communities: strong, empowered communities can transform the organization itself!
Join Shahin and Shawn in this interactive session to explore communities in organizations. Examine the benefits of building great communities. Learn how to spark the community, and how to support it as it evolves. Hear stories of communities empowered to improve the organization. Learn how to make a community into a driver of positive change.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the power and influence of community
  • Patterns for starting, building, supporting, and evolving a community
  • Tools to create greater organizational community out of smaller discipline-focused communities
  • Understanding how communities can drive positive changes

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Shawn Button

Shawn Button

Agile Coach, Leanintuit
An expert in agile development practices, Shawn Button is an agile/lean coach with the proven ability to help individuals, teams, and enterprises adopt better ways of working. Shawn believes that any team can do great things—with the right leadership, mentorship, and support. His... Read More →
avatar for Shahin Sheidaei

Shahin Sheidaei

Principal Coach, Elevate Change
Shahin is the founder and principal coach of Elevate Change Inc. Shahin is passionate to elevate organizations and people to their utmost potential. Offering over 13 years of experience, Shahin has strong expertise in applying Agile and Lean principles to organizational and personal... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
San Diego C

15:45

Practical Behavior Design You Can Use Today (Chris Shinkle)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
How do you maximize your chances of building an enduring product? It all comes down to engagement. As POs, it’s important our products are designed with this in mind. Good News! Behavior design offers many ideas to help solve this problem.
Much has been made lately about behavior design, but it’s not easy knowing how or where it applies. In this workshop, Chris will share techniques he has successfully used with clients. He will teach you how to leverage your story map to incorporate these ideas. He will share a simple process and give you chances to practice the ideas yourself. Come learn how this will improve your product.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Leverage Story Maps to build enduring products

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Shinkle

Chris Shinkle

Director of Innovation, SEP
Chris is an avid learner, teacher, and practitioner. He is a thought leader in the Agile community. At SEP, he loves initiating new ideas and continuous improvement. His experience comes from building and delivering products for more than 20 years. He has helped many companies... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 6

15:45

Effective Testing for the Whole Team: A workshop for everyone who cares (Clare Sudbery)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
How do you write the right number of tests, the right types of tests, at the right level, that are run at the right time and give the best feedback?
"Follow the test pyramid" is the pat answer, but in reality it is much trickier than this would imply. This is a hands-on workshop that aims to improve your testing skills by using a simple fake example and keeping things high level.
Workshop participants will be split into groups, ideally containing a mix of roles and skills in each group. We will perform a series of exercises to examine unit tests, integration tests, acceptance tests and smoke tests - as well as dig into the definitions of these terms and how widely their interpretations can vary between different companies and projects.
The exercises will look at when and why new tests should be created, and old tests deleted. Participants will see some code (which will be explained to those who are not developers), but they will not be expected to write any code.
This will be a great opportunity to really examine your approach to testing and understand WHY. The atmosphere will be informal and the emphasis will be on true practical outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Know which tests are most effective for different purposes
  • Know when to create and when to delete tests
  • Know how tests should fit into deployment pipelines
  • Know when you are making trade-offs, and why
  • Understand terms such as "integration tests", "acceptance tests", "smoke tests", "unit tests", "acceptance criteria"

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Clare Sudbery

Clare Sudbery

Lead Consultant Developer, ThoughtWorks
Clare Sudbery is a lead consultant developer for Thoughtworks, and particularly enjoys the mentoring side of her job. She is a maths graduate with 18 years of software experience, plus a few extra years thrown in doing everything from full time novelist to high school maths teacher... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Cardiff/Carlsbad

15:45

DevOpsing your Greenfield: Cultivating New Growth (Richard Mills)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
You have a golden gem of an activity. There's a brand new project and your project sponsor says "I want to do some DevOps on our new Agile project!" Sigh. You respond with "Well, how about this? Let's BE Agile and adopt a DevOps approach to structuring our teams, designing our architecture, and leveraging automation to rapidly deliver value to our customers." There. At least we've set the mood.
Regardless, greenfield projects provide a unique opportunity for us as DevOps professionals. You don't have the established baggage of a legacy project. The project is probably open to modern tools and architectures. The project is trying to set up team structure that will have the right skill sets.
The problem is: where you do you actually start with greenfield projects? When we introduce DevOps to an existing project (brownfield) we have a unique set of challenges and we can prioritize where to start based on our biggest problems. What do you do when you have a blank page? "Do everything!" Well, what actually makes up "everything" and where do we start?
Putting a solid DevOps solution in place involves some key things. You can follow the religion of the "Three Ways of DevOps" (fast delivery, fast feedback, constant learning) made popular by Gene Kim, but you still have to start somewhere. In this talk, I'll provide a pragmatic formula to setting up well-integrated teams, establishing a DevOps platform, organically growing an initial DevOps pipeline with continuous integration and continuous delivery, establishing some (useful) standards, and guiding the system architecture to support rapid build, deployment, and testing.
This talk is targeted directly at DevOps practitioners and project managers who are trying to establish the right priorities, practices, and organizational structure for new projects. It is also directly applicable to the same people trying to improve their existing projects.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize and understand the importance of team structure when practicing DevOps on small and large Agile projects
  • Prioritize the importance of developer standards, automated build and deployment, and automated testing for your project
  • Determine the requirements for your DevOps and operating platforms early in your project
  • Evaluate and select a baseline set of tools for building, deploying, and testing your software system
  • Establish an initial continuous integration and continuous delivery pipeline for your project
  • Recognize the critical importance of automated testing throughout your pipeline
  • Realize it's possible to deploy your working software into production-like environments within days or weeks of starting your project, not months or (heaven forbid) years.

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina E

15:45

Pivot on a dime – Business Agility experiments @ scale (Deema Dajani)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Did you know that your are a trail blazer simply by attending this topic? There is tremendous buzz around the term Business Agility, yet only 12% of companies are on the path to achieving it. We define business agility as synonymous with enterprise agility: a company’s way to sense and respond to change proactively and with confidence to deliver business value, as a matter of everyday business. Your whole enterprise would be on the same heartbeat, integrating business functions with software Product organizations in a way that allows the company to pivot on a dime. Scaling it in large enterprises and in traditional industries like Insurance...is a whole other ball game. This session aims to equip leaders and change agents for the effective executive conversations about business agility.
In this interactive session, we will explore three key topics to inspire you to start with your large enterprise:
1) The state of Business Agility today
2) Common misconceptions and challenges to overcome
3) Successful experiments towards better Business Agility - in Business Operations or run the business, customer experience functions, business crisis management, and integrated across the enterprise with software product organizations.
So, now what? Take a deep breath, recognize that you are an early adopter that can help shape this space, think big, and come to this session ready to learn and share.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Compare / Differentiate between enterprise business agility, and launching business agile teams
  • * Explain business agility definition is to an executive audience
  • * Classify 3 challenges to business agility transformation
  • * Infer 1 successful experiment to your current context, and how to frame it
  • * Interpret 3 skills for you to develop, to position yourself for leading business agility transformations

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Deema Dajani

Deema Dajani

Sr Principal Transformation Consulting, CA (Rally)


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 5

15:45

Management vs. Leadership – A problematic distraction to stop you from improving. (Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The words ‘management’ and ‘manager’ conjure up distaste for many. We hear everything from “managers are evil” to “managers are not needed in agile.” Everyone has a “bad manager story” that they like to rant about. But what is behind these rants? Amazing managers are out there. Why don’t we hear about them as often? Are those the managers who are “leaders”? If there are differences, what are they?
Teams and organizations need people to help them improve and grow, but they need the right kind of help. Most organizations have people who are managers who wake up in the morning and are not intent on ruining anyone’s day. What is limiting people from being great managers or being managers who are leaders? Everyone wants high-performance teams on paper, so where is the disconnect?
In this interactive session, we will start by unraveling confusing terms (manager, leader, self-organizing, self-managing) and then explore the causes behind this problematic distraction of leader vs. manager. Based on this foundation, we will identify what we need to change to support managers in their journey to improve. Please join me to have some fun AND dig into a challenging topic!

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Understand the recognize the difference between manager & leaders and self-organizing & self-managing teams
  • 2. Explore the impact of creating memes that pit managers against leaders.
  • 3. Process why even high-performance teams need people to help them.
  • 4. How to help managers change and improve, to help us all, help our organizations!

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina G

15:45

Organizational Learning: Getting Off the Ground (Alex Yakyma)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Have you ever wondered why is it so hard to instill a culture of learning in your organization? Have you experienced how vital empirical evidence is neglected and critical decisions are instead made based on speculation? Have you ever wondered what’s behind such organizational myopia and how you can help your enterprise overcome it?
Together we’ll immerse deep into organizational mechanisms that prevent enterprises from learning. We will see how existing organizational structure, its regular routines and leadership behavior encourage the certainty bias – an unreasonable confidence in speculative outcomes – and how this inhibits organizational learning.
But our journey won’t stop there. In the most critical part of the talk, we’ll discuss the tools you can use as an organizational leader, facilitator or coach, to address the certainty bias and instill a mindset of learning. We will seek answers in the following areas:
• Creating an environment of psychological safety that enables fearless exploration and ideation
• Establishing cross-cutting feedback loops that make validated learning possible
• Embracing uncertainty and variability in core organizational structures and routines
• Instilling the culture of outcome-oriented decisions
The neglect of organizational learning leads to the worst possible form of waste there is – the focus and energy of the entire organization is thrown at the wrong objectives. Let’s improve this together!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize common anti-patterns that inhibit organizational learning
  • Determine key organizational factors that impede learning in your environment
  • Apply the 4 tools for enabling the culture of learning


Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
San Diego A

15:45

Probabilistic Forecasting using data: Measuring how long it's going to take to deliver (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"When will the project be done?!" This single question has created more dysfunction and psychological danger than probably any other single demand in history of work.
Story points, ideal hours, task hours, I’ve even seen a director who un-ironically tracks "developer minutes" to handle these issues.
Focused Objective has created some simple, easy to use (and free) forecasting tools which we can learn about while actually doing probabilistic forecasting using pen and paper.
Together we will workshop two scenarios:
Estimating total project size (story count) by sampling a subset of all features or epics
Forecasting completion date using probabilistic forecasting (Monte Carlo) of estimated or measured teams’ throughput (completion rate) or velocity (points)
In this workshop you will
Learn how much sample data is required to undertake a reliable forecast
Learn how to spot erroneous data or data that will mislead a forecast
Learn how to use story count estimates on a subset of features to forecast a projects combined total story count, or to see if the count you have been given is likely
Learn how to use historical data to perform a feature completion date forecast, or to see if the date you have been given is possible.
The processes described involve using dice to simulate uncertainty in projects and building a probabilistic picture of the more likely outcomes (often called Monte Carlo simulation). It is a fast and accurate way to combine historical data into meaningful and verifiable results. By performing a Monte Carlo forecast by hand, you will realize how easy the technique is to perform and not be afraid to use it in your next estimation or forecasting task.
We will also discuss the choice between estimation in points versus throughput and how this impacts forecasting accuracy. We will also discuss how most tools available for forecasting go wrong, and how to understand how accurate your forecast using these methods should be considered.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how much sample data is required to undertake a reliable forecast
  • Learn how to use story count estimates on a subset of features to forecast a projects combined total story count, or to see if the count you have been given is likely
  • Learn how to use historical data to perform a feature completion date forecast, or to see if the date you have been given is possible.
  • Let’s bring real empirical data to the table and use it to make better decisions about how we manage our systems.


Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 9

15:45

Ask Me Almost Anything - Diana Larsen (Diana Larsen)

Abstract:
Some have called me a visionary pragmatist. When I write this, I am Chief Relationship Builder (and bottle washer) at the Agile Fluency™ Project. I also lead the practice area for Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions at FutureWorks Consulting. For more than 20 years, I've partnered with leaders to design work systems, improve team performance, and support leader and enterprise agility. I'm also a contributor to my profession. I've volunteered. I speak. I facilitate Open Space events. I co--authored the books Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great; Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams; Five Rules for Accelerated Learning; and co-originated the Agile Fluency™ model.
Why do I do this work? Why am I here? Fascinated curiosity. How do groups of people find ways to pick a direction and collaborate to move toward their vision? What helps them travel well together? What creates potholes and speed bumps along the way? My inquiry leads me toward a four-way intersection of:
  • agile (and pre-agile) approaches to improvement;
  • theories of leadership in complex systems;
  • how learning and fluency unfolds for groups and teams;
  • experiments in organization design that celebrate and embrace human diversity.
Is there a final utopian destination? Opinions vary. Does it matter? It's the journey that counts, and the rich conversations with our companions on the road.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

founder, Agile Fluency Project LLC
An international authority in Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions, Diana Larsen co-authored the books *Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great*; *Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams*; and *The Five Rules of Accelerated Learning... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

15:45

Facilitation skills for Testers (Toby Sinclair)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Think back to the last meeting you were in. Was it good, bad or ugly? The sad truth is that most meetings fall into the ugly category. No agenda, no clear purpose and no real outcomes.
As Testers, you often play the role of both attendee and host. You are often required to host meetings to review test results, refine backlog items, testing sessions with developers and demos with product owners. Many more testers are also involved in running longer workshops to explore testing topics such as automation often with a sceptical audience!
Facilitation is increasingly important in our increasingly collaborative work environments. Facilitation enables people to do their best thinking which helps increase the chances of a high-quality product. Sadly, most meetings and workshops are lacking this facilitation. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to solve that problem.
Whilst there is a big emphasis on testers becoming more technical, I found that facilitation was a super power I could bring to the team with leveraged some of my existing skills. I found that good facilitation was vital to help create the conditions for building high quality products. If I could facilitate the team to do their best thinking, it often resulted in less misunderstanding, less assumptions and greater clarity. Big wins for a tester!
In this practical workshop, you will learn exactly what facilitation is and how to facilitate meetings and workshops. You’ll leave with a facilitation toolkit that has tools you can apply to almost all facilitated discussions:
• The 6 keys to successful preparation
• Techniques to focus a group and remain on track
• Creative ways of gathering information and insights from groups
• Understand how to build psychological safety and trust within groups
• What to do if you have group dysfunction
Equipped with these new tools you’ll be able to return to your organisations to turn those ugly discussions into brain engaging, highly collaborative discussions that enable high quality outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - A better understanding of what facilitation is and why it’s can be a great skill for a tester.
  • - Learn several practical facilitation techniques you can immediately use in your next meeting.
  • - Techniques to working with different personalities in a workshop and how to deal with conflict.
  • - How to design workshops that are engaging, safe and collaborative.


Speakers
avatar for Toby Sinclair

Toby Sinclair

Personal and Team Coach


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina F

15:45

Agile is Dead, and it Died in Infancy (Doug Knesek)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Most of us feel like we’re pretty agile. But most of us don’t know that the inventors of agile development methods such as Scrum and XP delivered value (not code) four to ten times faster than classic software development methods. Very few of us have enjoyed anywhere near that level of performance. Commercial agile frameworks such as SAFe boast performance increases only up to about two times prior expectations. Why the huge gap? And what can we do about it?
We start with a brief agility survey to give you a sense of how agile your organization really is. Then we explain why commercial Agile frameworks fall short, and the vicious cycle those frameworks create. We then reveal the natural economics that underlies all agile practices (spoiler - it’s much simpler than teamwork, learning, or small batches). Finally, we conclude with a new vision and path forward, taking us well beyond agile as commonly practiced.

Learning Outcomes:
  • conceptual understanding of authentic agility
  • understanding of how agile as currently practiced limits us
  • understanding of what must be done to advance beyond agile as commonly practiced

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Doug Knesek

Doug Knesek

Director of Agile Development & Coaching, Flexion, Inc.
Doug Knesek is a developer, coach, and leader of agile teams and organizations with nearly 30 years of industry experience. Doug started developing software in about 1990 when waterfall was king. He abandoned waterfall and transitioned to the Unified Process in 1995, then abandoned... Read More →


Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

15:45

Visualizing and Creating High-Performance Customer-centric Design (Chloe Bregman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
“Our job, says Amazon CEO Bezos, is to invent new options that nobody’s ever thought of before and see if customers like them.” The World’s Most Innovative Company - Fast Company March 2017
Deloitte and Touche found that customer-centric companies were 60% more profitable compared to companies that were not focused on the customer. Having a strong company wide customer focus is more important than being agile alone to create high-performance design. Harvesting insights from feedback and driving them back into the customer experience with speed at scale makes a company innovative and agile.
Doing this successfully takes commitment to the vision of customer-centricity at every level within the organization. As companies grapple with the challenge of serving designs needs at scale whether from a studio, embedded or design system leveraged model there is no one size fits all answer to creating customer-centricity. However, there are 4 key elements that must be present within your organization in order to keep the customers needs, emotions and behavioral actions at the center of every design to generate the most value. Understanding this framework will give you the power to co-create a customer-centric culture where you are free to rapidly test and ship your most innovative ideas daily actualizing your company's potential.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1) Understand 4 key elements of a customer-centric culture
  • 2) Gain clarity on the how brand, service design and UX work together to help generate customer-centricity
  • 3) Learn how to inject customer-centric fast feedback loops into your agile ux process

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 6, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

16:30

The Flying and the Thud: Mental Health Issues on Agile Teams (Cass Van Gelder)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Years ago during a personal crisis, several of my friends who were unaware chastised me at a party for sitting in the wrong seat. While I had been struggling with deep medical issues, they had chosen microscopic issues to pick at and hover around, things that would not matter the next time the sun rose. I had likened it to my friends complaining I had ants in my sink while I was battling lions at my front door.
Similarly, through my work with Agile teams, I have seen a preponderance of ADHD, OCD, anxiety, etc. issues - team members' own personal lions at the door. Colleagues admonished them and even made fun of them behind their backs. Managers wrote them up for infractions that were more symptoms than real problems. What they are missing is the incredible caverns of hidden surprises that come from inside those brains.
Agile is currently being overwhelmingly used in software development. In turn, software developers have shown to have a preponderance of ADHD, OCD, Asperger's Syndrome, autism, Bipolar Disorder I and II, etc. Additionally, since Agile encourages teams to work together, these issues can be a stumbling block (and sometimes a 50 foot wall) that keeps the team from growing, and even from simply functioning.
While supervisors have supported ridding the teams of these "difficult" team members, I have advocated maintaining the members and tweaking our approach to be more inclusive.
Surprisingly, this became a more personal issue recently.
Come join me while I talk with you about my experience of advocating for understanding and accommodation, and a personal revelation of my own - my own lion at the door.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Basic Understanding of Mental Health Issues
  • Background on Common Mental Health Statistics and Their Effects
  • Connection to Agile
  • Potential Issues
  • Potential Solutions


Speakers
avatar for Cass Van Gelder

Cass Van Gelder

Scrum Master, CSM, CSPO, CSP-SM, CSP-PO, Kroll


Monday August 6, 2018 16:30 - 17:00
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

19:00

Sponsor Exhibits

Abstract:
Sponsors are an important element of the Agile2018 Conference. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in the Pacific Ballroom at Agile2018.

Monday August 6, 2018 19:00 - 22:00
Pacific Ballroom

19:00

Ice Breaker Reception

Abstract:
Join us for Agile2018’s opening night reception. The evening will be filled with food, drink, and games! Mix and mingle, chat with new Attendees, reconnect with old friends, and be sure to check out the Sponsor booths to see what’s new and exciting in the industry.

Monday August 6, 2018 19:00 - 22:00
Pacific Ballroom
 
Tuesday, August 7
 

07:30

Registration Open

Abstract:
Pick-up your badge and conference materials and ask any questions you may have at Agile2018 throughout the week.

Tuesday August 7, 2018 07:30 - 17:30
Marriott Grand Foyer

08:00

Breakfast

Breakfast

Tuesday August 7, 2018 08:00 - 09:00
Pacific Ballroom

08:00

Bookstore Open

Abstract:
Come check out the latest literature on agile practices.

Tuesday August 7, 2018 08:00 - 18:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:00

You Have to Say More There: Effective Communication in a Distributed Agile Team (Johanna Rothman, Mark Kilby)

Abstract:
For years, we’ve heard that only collocated teams can use agile approaches. This disregards the roughly 50% of agile teams who already are distributed or dispersed and their successes or failures. Instead of assuming agile teams can only be collocated, what if we wrote a book to help distributed and dispersed teams see options for their agile success?
As we co-wrote the book, we realized we were living the same principles as distributed and dispersed agile teams do. We worked in short timeboxes and reflected often. We chose to write together, rather than separately. (We did choose to create images separately so we could then discuss them together.)
We created at least two communication paths as backup for our primary path so we always had a way to talk with each other (google docs, Zoom, and text message). We learned the power of a streak, to continue writing every day (or as close to it as we could) to finish paragraphs, sections, and chapters. We learned how to use the tools and when to evolve the tools we used. We looked like an agile team, with continuous integration, continuous delivery (to each other), and continual reflection and refinement.
We also learned several key phrases that helped us learn when we worked well and not so well together. Some of these phrases are:
  • "You have to say more about that" (signaling it might be clear to one of us, but concerned a type of reader may not understand)
  • "When I’m not so tired, I’m pretty human" or "the writer did not show up today" (reflect our readiness to work and where we might lean on the other person)
  • Mind if I tweak that? (to switch pairing)
  • "I found where you are" and "Let me click to where you are" (when we needed to synchronize where we were working - in a Google doc)
  • "I’m okay with that" (reviewing work)
  • Comments, highlights and XX marks the spot for more work
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How checkins are valuable to reset/recreate our work together, by syncing on our context every time we worked together. (And allowed for a little whining about the weather.).
  • How cadences in writing are different than timeboxes.
  • How to pair at distance. How writing together made our work stronger (ideas and writing).
  • How to articulate our working agreements and evolve them.
  • Guidelines for pair writing at distance.
  • How to recognize key phrases that help a team write together.
  • How quick reflection can help collaboration.
  • How we could declare done or done for now: chapter goal, word count, and our definition of done

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
MARK KILBY has cultivated more distributed, dispersed, and virtual teams than colocated teams for more than two decades. Currently, Mark serves as an agile coach with Sonatype, a “remote first” software development company focusing on automation of software supply chains. Previously... Read More →
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 09:30
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

09:00

State of Business Agility (Sally Elatta, Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In the modern economy, companies do not have the luxury of stability. The impact of change, both technological and cultural, is greater and faster than ever before. In this environment, it is only those companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic who thrive.
This interactive presentation will show you who these companies are, how they operate and (more importantly) how you can become one.
Sally Elatta and Evan Leybourn will present key findings from the State of Business Agility report as well as transformational case studies from the industry and our experience. Throughout all this, we’ll make it relevant and actionable for you through a series of hands-on activities designed to show you where to focus your organisational efforts.

Learning Outcomes:
  • You will come away with a deep understand of business agility; both its context, definition and execution in companies around the globe. You will also;
  • Understand what Business Agility really means and why it is an organisational imperative now
  • Meet new friends and learn from others in the business agility community
  • Gain new insights from the State of Business Agility report
  • Be able to apply actionable takeaways for their transformations
  • Evangelise and champion business agility within their organisation
  • Engage community around the State of Business Agility


Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Founder, Business Agility Institute
Evan is the Founder and CEO of the Business Agility Institute; an international membership body to both champion and support the next-generation of organisations. Companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic - perfectly designed to thrive in today’s unpredictable markets. His... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

09:00

Everything you wanted to know about DevOps but were afraid to ask (Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As a career software tester, I've heard rumors DevOps culture will put me out of a job, so I took a job testing for a DevOps team. I'm new to DevOps, but aren't we all? What matters most is our teams' intentional decisions to grow our DevOps practices along with our development community.
Join me as I share my experiences blending disciplines, companies, levels of experience, and differing expectations as a member of efficient and effective delivery teams. I'll describe common cultural and interpersonal problems I experienced while transforming a cross-functional agile team dogfooding a DevOps implementation.
Whether you're into development, operations, testing, customer support, or product ownership, you'll leave with concrete strategies for improving your DevOps working relationships to keep the technology running smoothly. People factors strongly affect your DevOps technical outcomes, so optimizing your flow includes improving your people practices.
Don't feel afraid to ask about DevOps anymore!

Learning Outcomes:
  • The people factors that strongly affect your DevOps technical outcomes How to blend teams from different companies To sort through process and role differences Apply the Agile mindset in support of DevOps

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Developer, Agilist, Tester, ScrumMaster, Product Owner, Agile coach, Home Depot
Agilist working as part of product development teams to support and accelerate development through fast feedback. I help teams to craft more executable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marina D

09:00

Discovering “The Next Big Thing” (Matthew Carlson)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
People often think that innovations come from great minds in eureka moments where flashes of intuition bring about ideas wholly-formed from nothingness. In reality innovation is often a more systematic process of iteratively building on previous work and placing that work in a new context.
This salon will guide you through a disciplined process of theory building. You’ll start by exploring well established theories from other disciplines. Then, working in small groups, synthesize new ideas and apply them in an Agile context. Finally, you’ll help make these new ideas stronger through a collaborative process of refinement and evaluation. You’ll walk away with skills and tools to not only generate and carefully assess the ideas we come up with, but other models, frameworks, and theories.
Join us and help generate and explore what may be “The Next Big Thing.”

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Presidio 1 & 2

09:00

Getting to know a new-to-you team with self-assessments that are worth a damn (Brandi Olson)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Where do we start? What is this team actually doing? Is it working for them? For the company? How “agile” are they? When coaches and scrum masters start working with a new-to-them team, we are often asked to do an evaluation or assessment. This initial period of getting to know a new organization or team is critical to building a strong foundation of support. Equipping teams to do their own self-assessment and be in control of how the information is used is a powerful way to engage.
Okay, preaching to the choir here, you don’t need convincing that self-assessment is important. But, how do you get more value out of the practice? Every agile coach blogger and their grandma is coming out with a new self-assessment tool that is better than all the others, but what type of self-assessment is going to be a good fit for the team or organization? And how can you use this golden opportunity to set the stage for reflection and adaption at every level of the organization?
This session is for agile coaches, scrum masters, and leaders who want to either start doing self-assessments as part of their practice or get more value out of the assessment practices already in motion. We’ll cover practices and strategies for quick vital sign-type assessments that are sensitive to early indicators of change (like happiness!), along with other self-assessments designed to uncover deeper, more impactful culture shifts. Participants will have the opportunity to co-create the agenda, spending time on the strategies and topics that they collectively decide will be most valuable.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify when and how to use self-assessments with teams
  • Match self-assessment approaches with your context and goals
  • Support self-assessment practices that yield actionable data

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Brandi Olson

Brandi Olson

Chief Agilist, The Olson Group


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 8

09:00

Cultivating Psychological Safety: the Hard Parts (Alex Harms)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When we’re feeling stressed, threatened, or unsafe, our bodies help us do a lot of things better. We’re able to run faster, hit harder, yell louder. We are able to notice the slightest movement out of the corner of our eye.
Things we do not do better: think creatively, work collaboratively, solve problems.
These are very human activities, and they work best in a very human environment. Our movement is coming to realize that feeling free to express ideas, questions, joys and concerns without fear of rejection or judgment is vital for agile collaboration.
But even though we say "without fear of judgment", we don't do a lot of talking about how to actually get there. And it's hard!
Here's the hard part: we not only need psychological safety for ourselves, but we're a source of safety for our teammates. We all get scared, and we all have the power to ease each other's fears. Let's explore together what it takes to cultivate psychological safety for yourself and your team, and what gets in the way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to practice empathy and non-judgment
  • Three factors that contribute to psychological safety
  • How to lead a team towards safety when it's not your (or their!) primary job
  • How to find fondness for folks who irritate you, so that you can engage with them without setting off their 'unsafe' sensors
  • What leadership can do to encourage a culture of psychological safety

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alex Harms

Alex Harms

Coach, Maitria
Alex Harms wants to make the world a little gentler for developers and tech teams. By teaching and coaching from a place of mindfulness and empathy, Alex helps disempower fear, strengthen communication and build connection, so that tech teams learn together and thrive.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

09:00

Uncovering and Tapping into Your Team’s Culture in Real Time (Judy Levy)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
You know your role as an Agile Coach is to facilitate agile practices, foster collaboration, support self-organized teams, identify common objectives, AND do so while maintaining a balance between the team and the individual. That can be quite a tricky accomplishment!
But truly how do you focus on the whole while not abandoning the individual? How do you tap into the whole team to better shepherd the process?
In this immersive, interactive session, you will experience four ways to identify and to tap into the, often invisible, culture of the team in real time. You will also learn how teams can use this information to help themselves make decisions, provide safe places for marginalized voices to be heard, implement course corrections, and make progress.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn a model for thinking about groups of people/teams as a “system” to foster psychological safety and collaboration.
  • Experience at least 4 tools to access ‘hidden’ perspectives to access the culture of the team in real time.
  • Identify at least one tool or concept to take ‘back home’.


Speakers
avatar for Judy Levy

Judy Levy

LevyConsulting


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

09:00

Pragmatic Roadmaps for Agile Projects (Chris Shinkle)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
It’s easy to think of a roadmap as a fixed and detailed plan virtually etched in stone. They are often artfully crafted and designed… bosses love them and developers hate them. They leave us the job of tediously making updates to match the things we failed to deliver and let us down more often than not. Often, they don’t focus on real user needs and outcomes. Traditional approaches to roadmaps aren’t flexible enough for the agile methods most teams use today. We need a different approach.
Management often still want them because:
  • They want to be sure we’re working on the highest-value things first
  • They are trying to run a business, which means they need to be able to plan.
  • They need to make date-based commitments.
  • They need to coordinate efforts and dependencies with other parts of the organization.
For alternative approaches to be accepted, it must address these needs.
In Agile, we talk about creating a shared understanding of product goals. We recognize the value in getting everyone on the same page. A good roadmap is not so much a project plan as a strategic communication tool, a statement of intent and direction. It should capture the user’s goals and outcomes.
In this talk, hear how Chris is helping organizations take a pragmatic approach to roadmapping. You’ll learn how to address management’s core needs without frustrating your product delivery teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Learn how to capture and communicate the user's goals and desires (outcomes), not just features (outputs).
  • * Learn how to use the Opportunity Solution Tree to reframe the delivery goals.
  • * Learn that avoiding date-based commitments when possible will enable great flexibility and creativity with your delivery teams.
  • * Learn that a roadmap and release are different and serve different needs within the organization
  • * Learn that an effective roadmap minimally consists of a product vision, business objectives timeframes (not hard dates), and themes which might reference features and solutions.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Shinkle

Chris Shinkle

Director of Innovation, SEP
Chris is an avid learner, teacher, and practitioner. He is a thought leader in the Agile community. At SEP, he loves initiating new ideas and continuous improvement. His experience comes from building and delivering products for more than 20 years. He has helped many companies... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marina G

09:00

Unit Tests as Specifications (David Bernstein)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Test-driven development (TDD) is an essential developer practice for rapidly building quality software. But the unit tests we write with TDD can do more than just verify our code. They can also serve as clear specifications for creating testable behaviors that support refactoring. Many developers find that their unit tests break and require effort to maintain when they're refactoring code. The conventional wisdom for doing TDD is "test until bored," but we all have different thresholds for boredom so developers who follow this advice can end up writing too many tests and tests that break during refactoring. In this session, we'll discover how to determine the right kind and number of unit tests needed to specify any behavior. This helps ensure that we're creating tests that clearly document the behavior of the system and support us in refactoring our code later.
Writing good unit tests is a critical skill that developers need to master in order to get the most benefit from doing TDD. Tests must be unique, written at the right level of abstraction, and implementation-independent in order to be most valuable. When we understand how to use tests to articulate the behaviors we want to create, we can recognize the correct number and kind of tests needed to describe the behavior we want to build, putting every member of a team on the same page and building the right kind and number of tests that drive the creation of any behavior in the system. When we do this our tests become a form of living specifications.
In this session, we'll cover effective techniques for doing TDD that support building useful tests and quality code. You'll learn how to instrument unit tests, so they also act as specifications that make a test's intention clear. You'll also learn how to approach TDD in a way that yields the right number and kind of tests that allow you to refactor code later without breaking tests. Working through a few code examples, we'll see how many assertions are required to specify a linear range, exceptions, and other boundary conditions. We'll look at how to write tests that don't need to be changed when the code is refactored while still keeping test coverage high. If you've struggled to apply TDD on a project, or are just not sure how to start, then this session is for you.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the minimal number of tests required to specify a behavior
  • Write unit tests that validate behavior, not implementation
  • Instrument tests so they clearly read like specifications
  • Build test suites that act as a safety net for refactoring
  • Avoid many common pitfalls when doing TDD
  • Use unit tests to specify testable behaviors

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Bernstein

David Bernstein

Consultant, To Be Agile
David Scott Bernstein is the author of the new book _Beyond Legacy Code: Nine Practices to Extend the Life (and Value) of Your Software._ It’s an insider’s view of the software industry drawn from his decades of hands-on experience as a software developer, trainer, and consultant... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marina F

09:00

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Production Support...Even on Feature Teams (David Frink)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Production Support is hard and thankless. If you do it well, few will notice. If you do it poorly, you'll quickly find yourself on email chains or in meetings with senior-level executives. Probably not the way you wanted to get more "exposure".
Discovering how to manage production support is one of the key things a business or a team must do to succeed. Some feel that a team should be either 100% dedicated to production support or 100% dedicated to new feature development. Others feel that the team that builds a thing should also support it in production.
Using his experience as an Agile Coach, Production Support Manager, Development Manager and Developer, David will discuss the common challenges with production support in an agile environment and provide ideas to help teams survive and thrive.
Whether the team is 100% dedicated to support or balancing feature work with support, production support depends on clear communication, good working agreements (processes), sense of urgency and relentless continuous improvement.
This session is for anyone who works with or on teams that have production support responsibilities. The session will cover specific strategies and techniques to:
  • Make production support easier for your teams
  • Decide if production support should be separate from or embedded into feature teams
  • Apply systems thinking to reduce and eliminate interruptions and fire-drills
  • Ensure effective communication around issues so nothing gets lost
  • Help production support be a driver for continuous improvement within the team using the "Blameless Production Incident Retrospective" technique with 5 key questions to ask
  • Keep customers delighted, even when things go wrong
You'll come away with things you can start implementing as soon as you get back to work.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 3 different models for managing production support, with their pros/cons
  • Communication strategies (how to receive requests with minimum disruption, how to keep stakeholders updated)
  • The Blameless Production Incident Retrospective technique
  • How to think like a fire marshal, not a firefighter

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Frink

David Frink

Agile Coach, Eliassen
David is a reformed developer and manager and is an Agile Coach with Eliassen in Raleigh, NC. Through his 18 years of experience he's solved complex technical and organizational challenges and helped teams as they embrace and wrestle with agile adoption at various scales... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
San Diego C

09:00

Going where no-one has gone before (Antti Kirjavainen, Mirette Kangas)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Yle (Finnish Broadcasting Company) is the pioneer in digital transformation and one of the leading public service media companies in Europe. We are public funded and share the experiences and knowledge we have within industries. Two years ago Yle received “The Best Lean Performance of the Year” award in Finland. What we have achieved in Lean-Agile is now one of the top benchmarks as well in Finnish corporates as in European Broadcast Union (EBU).
We have travelled a long way but we are still at the beginning of our transformation story. The transformation in Yle started from the development of digital services. In that area, there were plenty of benchmarks to draw upon, even when this transformation work started ten years ago. Even at the company strategy and portfolio levels, there were benchmarks in software development to draw influences from.
Currently, our Lean Agile Culture Accelerator´s evolutionary purpose is to ensure Yle´s competitive advantage through the Lean culture adaptation in creative and knowledge work.
Toward that goal, we have focused in other areas than the development of digital services: creating creative cross/transmedia content, modern journalism (both broadcast and online) and all the disciplines related to these including creative concepting, production, shooting, arranging sets, producing graphics, etc.
Working to transform this work at Yle to the Lean Culture with the people responsible for this work, we have often faced this question: "where are the benchmarks for an agile way of doing this?" This being journalistic work in news desks, creative transmedia productions, strategic prioritization of company key product portfolio etc.
After reaching out in our networks and making visits to several companies world-wide, we have come to the conclusion that it is us at Yle who have the task to create benchmarks in these areas.
That means our transformation work with experts of these disciplines is an exploration. We have adapted our ways for this:
  • New ways of sharing what we have learned from experiments in various parts of the organization.
  • Trainings which promote exploration together and adapting principles to different contexts over indoctrinating over set of principles and practices.
  • Community events to increase shared understanding through collaborative sense-making.
  • Demos where we share our new innovations and learnings from our mistakes and invite change agents from other organizations to share their stories.
  • Building networked communities inside and outside our company, to share findings and to learn from individuals and companies from networks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • how to approach applying lean and agile thinking in domains where there are no previous benchmarks or good practices
  • how to arrange agile trainings for adapting agile values, principles and practices for various domains outside of software development
  • how to arrange agile trainings in a way that promotes learning and exploration together and creates networks of learners inside an organization
  • how to arrange community events that promote aligning shared understanding, learning together and sharing experiences between different organizational units
  • how to build networked communities inside and outside companies to foster learning both inside the organization and in the communities
  • how to coach teams and business units in a way that fosters their own agency, proactiveness and entrepreneurial mindset and in the same time fosters an aligned agile company culture inside the organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mirette Kangas

Mirette Kangas

Chief Lean-Agile Culture Officer, YLE
Mirette is the founder of Lean-Agile Culture Accelerator at Yle, Finnish Broadcasting Company. Lean Culture in Creative Work. Focusing now on growing the scope of the cultural transformation and spread the new approach to leadership across the organization. Previously leader of service... Read More →
avatar for Antti Kirjavainen

Antti Kirjavainen

Collaboration Gardener, Co-Founder, Flowa
Antti Kirjavainen, a co-founder of Flowa and a coach at Lean-Agile Culture Accelerator at Yle, is an entrepreneur and a coach helping digital businesses reach their potential through new methods of creative and knowledge work.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 9

09:00

Paying for Performance, get what you pay for, pay for what you get (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Everybody knows we all come to work to get paid. If we get paid more then we work harder and do a better job than if we got paid less.
Abraham Maslow taught us about our 'hierarchy of needs' in which he posits that we need money more than anything else and the judicious application and withholding of money will create performance.
So why are we paying underperforming software engineers so much money?!
Okay, so this all seems like a very uncharitable perspective on workers, what if we had an alternative option for helping people achieve their own goal of doing their best at work?
There are a lot of assumptions in play when we seek to motivate people with money. Let's get together and dispel some myths and explore real options for getting the most out of our teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the science of performance pay as taught by Pfeffer and Deming respectively.
  • Understand ways to achieve real intrinsic motivation to get things done.


Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marina E

09:00

Accelerated Learning: How Agile Can Help You? (Artur Margonari)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Have you ever thought about applying your Agile knowledge to learn something you want?
Want to learn how to play an instrument? Want to learn a new language? Want to know how to juggle balls?
Whatever is the new skill you are willing to learn, believe me: Agile can help you with it.
In our life, we often face the need of learning something new. Sometimes it’s for the job. Sometimes to impress the person we love. Sometimes it’s simply for fun, as a new hobby… Whatever is the reason, we know this knowledge/skill can be challenging to acquire and it cannot (yet) be downloaded straight into our brain. We still need to read books, to study, to follow classes and lessons, to do researches, to practice and of course: be patient, because the learning curve might be very slow…
In order to accelerate this learning process, many techniques and tricks have been created along the years. And as I’m one of these people who are always trying to learn something new and excited to see results as fast as possible, I’m always looking for these tricks and methods to support me in the learning process. And in this pursuit for ways to learn faster and faster, my attention was caught, in special, by one of these methods.
It’s not a complicated method. In fact, it’s basically 5 simple steps and I’ll share this technique with the audience. You may ask me: “Ok, nice. But what's the relation with Agile?".
That's exactly the reason why this method caught my attention: it’s incredibly similar to Agile values, principles and practices! You will be surprised! And I don't know about you, but the Waterfall-style learning scares me a lot!
Thus, if you know what Agile is about, you are halfway to use it in your favor to learn anything you want, fast.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn and be ready to apply a technique of accelerated learning which can be applied to pretty much anything
  • Understand what is the relation between this accelerated learning technique with Agile values and principles (you will be astounded)
  • Compare it to real examples of skills which I acquired and I'm acquiring in this way.
  • Discover which of theses skills worked well, which didn't and why (Waterfall-style learning, move aside!)
  • Enjoy (hopefully) a live demonstration at the end
  • Be empowered and inspired to learn and practice what you are eager to!

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Artur Margonari

Artur Margonari

Agile Coach, Trainer and Facilitator, Wemanity
Artur Margonari is passionate about Agile, which he applies daily in his personal life as well. He works as Agile Coach, Trainer and Facilitator at Wemanity Belgium and has more than 5 years experience in practicing and helping organizations to be more Agile, to form powerful teams... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 6

09:00

Learning Agility Learning Lab (Pat Reed, Debra Boseck)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Have you ever been faced with an 'extreme' challenge that you needed to resolve very quickly - but didn't have a clue how to solve it? Imagine developing the ability to learn real time from these kinds of challenges as they emerge. Developing this rare capability is at the heart of sustainable transformation. Conventional wisdom tells us that we need to develop an exhaustive set of training materials and workshops to develop the myriad skills to successfully lead large scale transformations. Advances in neuroscience, however, are telling us that what matters most is rapid recall – and that requires an agile mindset as well as anchoring and layering action learning to coherently change our behavior and build habits over time. This is best achieved through weaving learning and breakthrough insights into our daily workflows. This interactive workshop will provide some surprising insights from the latest breakthroughs in how we learn, and provide some practical takeaways on how to self assess on the differentiating skills we need to focus on and how to create an action based personal development plan to get started on our personal path to learning agility. This workshop is targeted to learners at all levels as well as coaches, and learning professionals associated with any organization preparing for, or in the process of, an enterprise-wide agile transformation or interested in gaining a competitive advantage in todays volatile business environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize and understand preconditions and differentiating capabilities to focus on developing to accelerate personal and organizational learning agility
  • Infer and understand the importance of self awareness and how to generate a self assessment to baseline and monitor core learning agility capabilities
  • Recognize and understand why it’s important to assess how cognitive biases and mental models distort and block our ability to learn
  • Create an action plan to incorporate critical enablers into a personal learning development plan; and playbook to identify and avoid common traps
  • Acquire a practical playbook of free tools to apply to your teams and organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Debra Boseck

Debra Boseck

Business Agility Leader, Slalom Consulting
Debra Boseck is a thought leader in enterprise business agility and transformation. She leverages over 25 years of consulting experience in working with some of Silicon Valley’s most impactful companies to guide their agile transformation journeys. Debra has been with Slalom Consulting... Read More →
avatar for Pat Reed

Pat Reed

Consultant, iHoriz
Experienced enterprise agile coach and consultant adjunct professor at UC Berkeley Agile Management Program Director on the Agile Alliance Community Leader and co-founder of PMI's Agile Community of Practice experienced Agile Executive for more than 25 years at The Walt Disney Company... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
San Diego A

09:00

Deal Me In! Portfolio Dashboard Poker – A Fun Way to Align Business & Technical Goals (Jason Tice)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
How well do you understand how to interpret the indicators & metrics on your portfolio dashboard to guide decision-making processes? Do you know which indicators support key business goals or technical strategies your organization is targeting to achieve? Is your portfolio dashboard able to balance efforts between business goals, such as new acquiring new customers, and technical goals, such as migrating to a new platform?
As part of digital transformation in Global 100 organizations, we have observed that agile delivery can struggle when the portfolio dashboard is not aligned well to specific business or technical goals. We have also observed other scenarios where the portfolio dashboard has become so complex, you need a PhD to understand how to interpret the data it provides. In such instances, lack of a understandable & comprehensive dashboard can result in localized success while ultimately large programs fail and business goals are not achieved.
In this NEW workshop at Agile2018, you will get chance to meet other conference attendees as you work together to design a portfolio dashboard that includes indicators and metrics that guide the right balance between business and technical goals. Working as a team, you will use 50+ "metric cards" and a poker style game to design a dashboard and share it with others. Participants will experience how collaborating on dashboard design can be FUN and can enable all to understand the intent of the indicators and metrics included in the dashboard and how to interpret them.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will experience a collaboration framework that enables design of portfolio dashboards that balance business and technical goals – by participating in the workshop, each group will go through a dashboard design cycle to enable repetition/application of the method following Agile2018.
  • Awareness of 52+ portfolio level metrics inclusive of business goals, delivery/development goals, and operational readiness.
  • Exposure to portfolio scenarios that balance both business needs/goals with technical/architecture goals, and how to find common ground between business desires & technical desires.
  • Participants will see how working as a team to design a dashboard enables a shared understanding of what the different metrics the dashboard contains and a shared understanding of what each metric means / indicates.
  • Those attending will observe how staging a marketplace for cross talk between teams enables rapid and engaging learning between teams & individuals moreso than other cross-talk & sharing methods.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Tice

Jason Tice

Vice President of Business Innovation, World Wide Technology
Jason Tice serves as the Vice President of Business Innovation at World Wide Technology and in this role, leads an international team of innovation consultants that use collaborative methods and open space practices to identify and achieve strategic outcomes. As part of World Wide... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 5

09:00

Ask Me Almost Anything - Jeff Patton (Jeff Patton)

Abstract:
This session is about product thinking, product ownership, and how to give customers and users what they need and not just what they ask for.
There’s always too much to build. Always. And, most of what we build doesn’t succeed. At least not to the level we’d hoped. Agile development alone doesn’t solve this biggest challenge with software development, and all product development for that matter. But, contemporary product thinking does bring us some practices that do help. Come chat with Jeff and discuss the essentials of product thinking and how we use product discovery approaches to articulate and test solution ideas quickly and cost effectively before fully investing in production software. Feel free to ask questions about how stories and story maps can help, and any other product development questions that might come to mind.
In 2000, Jeff worked as a product manager at one of the first companies adopting Extreme Programming. It was there he built a strong appreciation for the discipline that Agile thinking brings to software development and a deep concern for what seemed to be left out, specifically good product thinking. Since then Jeff has been an evangelist championing the inclusion of strong product design and user experience practice in Agile development. Today Jeff teaches and coaches a contemporary blend of practice that incorporates Lean and Lean Startup and Design Thinking all directed at helping organizations build products their customers love.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

09:00

CANCELLED: Cucumbers and Raspberries (Steve Tooke)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Cucumber can be used to test just about anything. Today. we're going to use Cucumber to test-drive an internet radio running on a Raspberry PI. It's going to be fun. And maybe a bit noisy!
Along the way, you'll learn techniques for isolating your tests from external dependencies.
At work, you probably struggle with tests that call out to other teams' APIs, or hit slow-running databases, or run behind awkward-to-automate user interfaces. Today, you'll be confronted with physical button that's impossible to automate (unless you built a robot!) so what are you going to do?
You'll experience how to de-couple your code from the real world using a ports-and-adapters or hexagonal architecture. You'll learn how this has advantages for testability and makes for a natural separation of concerns that makes the code easier to read too.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - build an internet radio using a raspberry pi, a couple of resistors and a push-button
  • - refactor coupled code towards a ports-and-adapters design


Speakers
avatar for Steve Tooke

Steve Tooke

Co-founder, Cucumber Ltd
TDD, BDD, Mob Progamming, Remote Work, DDD, EventSourcing, CQRS, Bread


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Balboa/Mission Hills

09:00

Testing in Agile (Dan Ashby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Software Testing is one of the most misunderstood things within the software industry. Too many people have misconceptions about the craft, but thats probably because it's hard to define and describe.
Lots of people look to models for answers, but because all models are fallible, they've added to the problem... Take the automation pyramid as an example - Many people have formed testing strategies around the automation pyramid based on the flawed thinking that you can automate all the testing things.
So what is software testing? Where does it fit in Agile? What does "good" testing look like? And how can we fit this "good" testing within a continuous integration and continuous delivery/deployment environment? This talk will shed light on these answers, first looking deeply into the world of software, and at it's core, it's relationship with information. All while I share an insight into the psychology side of software testing along with some true stories and life lessons I've obtained along the way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Members of the audience will learn:
  • - the truth about software testing
  • - where testing fits within the context of Agile
  • - the misconceptions to avoid
  • - some very useful models to help the understand about testing and to use to help them become more fluent in talking about testing within their workplace

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Balboa/Mission Hills

09:00

Purpose Powered Performance (Naveed Khawaja)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
From production to productivity to purpose, how is this new era of operational excellence going to drive change? The implementation of lean and agile strategies has brought big improvements in performance, yet star performers are still looking for something more meaningful.
Just as mass production, factories, schools and trains tore apart the very DNA of our societies across the globe in the late 60s - we are entering a new era of 24x7 connectivity that is redefining the overall family, social, professional and global norm.
By addressing the true root cause of intrinsic motivation, he managed to transform such an organization to a forecasted profit of 25% in less than a year.
In this session, he will show you why you should give your teams a purpose, in pursuit of further innovation & excellence.
I will help you see how the future high performing business is powered by purpose. Better - for people, communities, society the natural world, and future generations - is better for boardroom and shareholders.
My extensive and innovative research, experience and expertise in business transformation points me to the conclusion that productivity is a bi-product of motivation that is creatively driven by a bigger purpose. I will share the power of purpose orientation that we have cascaded from vision to mission to strategy to execution at multiple levels within various departments.
There is are three short, yet powerful interactive components of the session to enable the participants in grasping the ideas and taking practical tips to implement in their teams.
Let me take you on a roller-coaster journey of enabling excellence in the post-industrial digital age.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To grasp the idea of future of productivity beyond lean, agile and kanban.
  • To appreciate the missing piece of the puzzle in the future of productivity, agility and leanness.
  • To understand the patterns of optimization in the recent three revolutions.
  • The definition of productivity has been redefined multiple times over the past few decades. The latest one is based on intrinsic motivation and the mental freedom that works beyond making money.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Naveed Khawaja

Naveed Khawaja

Director, Agile & Lean Business Transformation (Master Trainer & Coach), Xecofy Consulting
A busy British father of five who sees the family and life as a whole with the Agile & Lean lens on a daily basis and inspires people all around the world. | | Some friends call him "the KanBan Man" as he helps everyone in being more productive and living a more fulfilled life... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

09:00

Collaborative Prototyping with Design Studio (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
“Good ideas come from everywhere. It's more important to recognize a good idea than to author it.” ― Jeanne Gang
You are surrounded by smart people, but are you really getting the most from that brilliance when it comes to creative ways to solve problems in your products?
At the end of this short exercise, you will have generated lots of ideas from every member of your team, rapidly iterated on them, and created a shared understanding around different aspects of the problem you are solving. Better yet, it requires minimal facilitation skill and prep. This enables agile and lean teams to work faster together by generating ideas from everyone on the team, and collaboratively iterating on them.
I have used this technique to help teams increase their understanding of the problem, visualize the needs they were requesting, quickly experiment with new ideas, and provide detailed input to the design process. It is amazing what comes out. Gaps in understanding, which were assumed to be shared, are revealed and explored. Ideas form that were never mentioned in earlier conversations, but turn out to be critical to the product. Often, the sketch (or a photo of it) acts as the deliverable for simple problems, eliminating the need for more formal wireframes. Because the whole team participated, the documentation needs are drastically reduced.
This interactive workshop will give you a brief overview of the Design Studio tool and then guide you through an immersive and collaborative experience on how it works. By the end, you will be able to speak about the benefits of the technique as well as run it with your own teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the value & mechanics of a design studio workshop
  • Hands-on experience with at least 2 rounds of collaborative sketching & feedback
  • See how ideas evolve from one session to the next as feedback is incorporated into the next round's sketches
  • Stories of how other disciplines, from developer to executive, have embraced this technique
  • The confidence to experiment with this exercise with your current team


Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Cardiff/Carlsbad

09:00

Agile Alliance Initiatives

Abstract:
Initiatives are ideas and concepts that develop into plans for action. They are proposed by Agile Alliance members or the Agile Alliance board of directors. Initiatives help the Alliance deliver on its mission to support people who explore and apply Agile values, principles, and practices to make building software solutions more effective, humane, and sustainable.” There is an Initiative Shepherd available to assist individuals with concept development.

Stop by the Agile Alliance Lounge to see all our initiatives, get involved, or propose one of your own!

Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:00

Agile Alliance Lounge Open

Abstract:
Take a break from Agile2018 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff, and visit the Agile Advice and Business Agility areas. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:45

Reinventing Research: Agile in the Academic Laboratory (Kendra West)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In a world of editable genomes and customizable cancer treatment, it’s time to reconsider how the academic lab operates in order to keep pace with rapidly advancing research. The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard is one of the world’s leading genomic research centers, where over thirty academic laboratories, groups, and platforms work collaboratively to enhance human health and medicine. “Agile Academia”, the Broad’s Agile affinity group, is working to help academic laboratories to incorporate Agile values into their day-to-day operation in order to more quickly respond to change and enhance the research process. This talk will detail Agile adoptions by multiple Broad Institute laboratories and introduce challenges faced by the teams — competing priorities, staggered timelines, scientists’ skepticism, and how best to support inherently individualized work. Agile consultants and practitioners of all experience levels will learn new strategies for introducing and fostering Agile values in novel contexts.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • A clear understanding of how academic research is performed, how academic labs work, and how the Agile values can enhance teams in this space
  • Methods to approach the introduction of Agile values in a field with no industry-specific examples
  • Recommendation of Agile-based tools to complement any type of team, regardless of industry
  • How a successful introduction of Agile-based tools can lead to accelerated, organic team growth
  • Strategies to align individuals who have differing goals in order to build a team and foster collaboration

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kendra West

Kendra West

Scrum Master, The Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard
Scrum master and science nerd! I enjoy exploring ways to enhance teams and organizations through coaching and creativity.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 09:45 - 10:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

10:15

Morning Break

Morning Break

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:15 - 10:45
All Foyers

10:30

Business Agility Lab

Abstract:
Did you know that over half of Agile teams have issues with development and business people working together effectively? A core principle behind the Agile Manifesto is that they must do so daily throughout their project. Without adopting the Agile practice of daily collaboration, organizations struggle to deliver high customer value.

To address this, Agile Alliance will have a special area in the Agile Alliance Lounge: the Business Agility Lab. You’ll be able to participate in one of the widest retrospectives regarding understanding key positive and negative themes with Agile and business — the Narrative Project. You can add your voice by submitting a story or helping design experiments to amplify Agile principles inside your company.

Business leaders who understand the benefits of Agile will also be on hand to offer tips about improving your company’s Agile adoption process. Ray Arell (former Sr. Director at Intel), Heidi Musser (former VP & CIO at USAA), Hendrik Esser (VP at Ericson), and Steve Denning (former Director at World Bank) look forward to helping you!

The Business Agility Lab will be open Monday-Thursday from 10:30-16:30, with activities announced daily. We look forward to your participation!

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:30 - 12:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

10:45

The Foundations of Business Agility (Shane Hastie)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In the 21st century, organisations need to
Put the customer in the centre of our focus
Shed outdated ways of thinking
Embrace an agile mindset
Incorporate new ways of working
Leverage the pace of change for competitive advantage
This talk explores what it means to be agile in a business context. It looks at the key elements needed, how they are interwoven and what is needed for organisations to transform their thinking and behaviour into new ways of working.
Business Agility is about putting the customer at the center of the organization’s focus, changing from measuring activities to outcomes and creating an ecosystem which unleashes the productivity and innovation already present in the people in the organisation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why business agility is imperative to cope in a VUCA world
  • Ways the organisation needs to change to become an agile business
  • Ways the individuals in the organisation need to change in order to allow the organisation to become truly agile
  • Participants prepare a personal action plan with ideas about how to start making changes that will move themselves and their organisations towards being a more agile business

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Shane Hastie

Shane Hastie

Director of Agile Learning Programs, ICAgile
Coach, trainer, passionate agilist from New Zealand | Director of Agile Learning Programs for ICAgile | Member of the Agile Alliance board 2011 - 2016. | Founding Chair of Agile Alliance New Zealand. | Lead Editor for Culture & Methods on InfoQ.com


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

10:45

Development Practices, Explained (Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Agile isn’t about preventing mistakes, it’s about making mistakes cheaper.
Years ago I was on a project that seemed to make every mistake a project can make. Let’s take a stroll down memory lane and look at all the mistakes that could and did go wrong and which of the 6 agile development practices helps us not to prevent the mistake, but to make it so cheap as to not be worth remembering.
The 6 Development practices:
Onsite customer
Pair Programming
Refactoring
Continuous Integration
Test Driven Development
Iterative Development

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to reduce the costs of mistake around:
  • Doing what is asked but not wanted.
  • Misestimating what % is done
  • Bugs
  • Misunderstanding requirements
  • Employee turnover
  • Hard to understand code


Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina D

10:45

Discovering “The Next Big Thing” II (Matthew Carlson)

Abstract:
People often think that innovations come from great minds in eureka moments where flashes of intuition bring about ideas wholly-formed from nothingness. In reality innovation is often a more systematic process of iteratively building on previous work and placing that work in a new context.
This salon will guide you through a disciplined process of theory building. You’ll start by exploring well established theories from other disciplines. Then, working in small groups, synthesize new ideas and apply them in an Agile context. Finally, you’ll help make these new ideas stronger through a collaborative process of refinement and evaluation. You’ll walk away with skills and tools to not only generate and carefully assess the ideas we come up with, but other models, frameworks, and theories.
Join us and help generate and explore what may be “The Next Big Thing.”

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Presidio 1 & 2

10:45

Get those managers out of my way! #ManagersAreIndividualsToo (Antoinette Coetzee, Judith Mills)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
How often have you heard agilists say managers "don't get Agile"? At the same time not a lot of agilists have been in management roles, so could we also say "Agile coaches don't get management"?
Let's face it, agilists and traditional management look at the world very differently. Yet if we as coaches want to help create agile enterprises we not only have to understand the world a manager lives in, we need to develop compassion with them as individuals.
If you are keen to develop your ability to support managers on their Agile journey, join Judith and Antoinette, two Agile coaches who have been in management positions themselves. Let's look at our own biases around power and authority and how that influences our interactions. Expect to walk away with a deeper understanding of the specific challenges managers face when transitioning to an Agile way of working, increased compassion for managers and a coaching approach to truly meet them where they are.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insight into how managers spend their time
  • Understanding the challenges of managers in the average organisation
  • Compassion for the transformation managers have to go through in Agile organisations
  • Awareness of personal blind spots, especially with regards to power/authority/bosses
  • How to meet managers where they are and coach them through the change


Speakers
avatar for Antoinette Coetzee

Antoinette Coetzee

Agile Coach, Just Plain Agile
I was introduced to Agile as a technical team member 21 years ago and have worked my way through different roles during the years. I spent many years in many countries mentoring people in grassroots agile. My first love remains change and transformation and these days I am focused... Read More →
avatar for Judith Mills

Judith Mills

Coach, Judith Mills Consulting
Judith Mills is interested in people. Rising through the ranks from software engineer to VP Development at a global software company, Judith is equally comfortable talking with teams about building great applications as she is working on organizational strategy in the boardroom. Her... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

10:45

The Fear and Vulnerability Retrospective (Andy Cleff)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
As a coach, do you know what makes your teammates lose sleep at night?
The best way to find out is simple, but not always easy: ask them!
Fear is often about risk; more specifically, the risk of losing something. Maybe folks get defensive or aggressive when faced with that risk. Maybe their stomachs get queasy. Everyone has their own personal early warning systems.
During this hands-on workshop, Andy will present a technique (via facilitation and hitting “pause” to go “meta”) suitable for retrospectives or lift offs.
You’ll learn by doing: sharing your fears and vulnerabilities with total strangers. (Oh, yeah, we’re going there.) By experiencing this technique first hand, you’ll later be able to coach others to move outside of their comfort zone and into their stretch zone where perceptions expand and transformations can take place.
As Abraham Maslow said: “In any given moment, we have two options: to step forward into growth or to step back into safety.” Join Andy and take a great leap forward...

Learning Outcomes:
  • Add a tool to your retro / team chartering kit, enabling teams to make safety a prerequisite by honestly sharing their fears and vulnerabilities.
  • And at the same time explore what might be holding you back from "the next level of growth", and build your own actions list.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andy Cleff

Andy Cleff

Director, Product Engineering & Agility, RobustWealth
Andy is an experienced and pragmatic agile practitioner that takes teams beyond getting agile to embracing agile. His chief weapons are well-asked questions, insightful retrospectives and an ability to withstand awkward silences. And if all else fails, beer. He is also part of the... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 6

10:45

From Contempt to Curiosity, Creating the Conditions for Groups to Collaborate (Andrea Chiou, Caitlin Walker)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Traditional organizational structures are ill-equipped to deal with volatility and scarce resources. Similarly disadvantaged youth have to deal with volatility and scarce resources in their lives. What if there was a similar process that could teach street youth and organizations in a lean agile way? Caitlin Walker will share how she taught disadvantaged youth a simple method to inquire about their own and one another's resourcefulness until they could collaborate and succeed. She'll show how the skills of exquisite attention and high curiosity can benefit agile teams and culture change.
Clean Language is a very simple set of questions that can give a person and a group that vital sense of autonomy and self-awareness. Done well in a group the network of interactions and shared mental models means fewer silos and assumptions and greater resilience! Alternating between real life examples and playful practice - we'll get you using clean language questions and jazzed about the potential for companies taking on the Clean way of working.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn a new way of listening, asking with curiosity.
  • Participants will come away with new information about themselves, as a result of peer-coaching using Clean Questions.
  • They'll have a new appreciation for each other's individual experiences, often expressed unconsciously through metaphor.
  • They'll experience that 'attending to' and 'extending from' another person's words creates new possibilities.
  • They'll learn that harvesting the wisdom already inherent in the room (or system, or person) is best done, when one's own mind is quiet and focussed on others.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Chiou

Andrea Chiou

Clean Coach and Facilitator, Connections-At-Work, LLC
I have been in IT since 1991, most recently as a coach. I've got a notion (and I'm not alone) that strong connection to one's peers and colleagues in collaborative work leads to the best possible outcomes, free of unstated fear, competition, and filled with creativity and results... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin Walker

Caitlin Walker

Director, Training Attention CIC
I support groups to develop strategies for shifting their attention away from Conflict and Contempt and #Drama. When they're in contempt, they can detect it, acknowledge it, get curious and shift themselves and others. They can move from the addictive #Drama towards action. From a... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego A

10:45

Product Owners - Increasing your Situational Awareness! (Bob Galen)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
If you ask almost anyone in the agile community about the keys to Product Ownership, I think you’ll get replies focused on user stories, backlogs, MVP’s, and customer value. And yes, all of those are interesting and important aspects of the role.
But it might be more important for you to become more situationally aware and adept at analyzing and navigating critical decisions in your daily life. That’s where this workshop comes in.
Join Bob Galen as you explore commonly experienced product ownership scenarios. We’ll break into groups of three and use a Coaching Dojo format where you’ll explore a variety of challenging scenarios – deciding on the most effective ways to handle each. Then we’ll share those strategies and techniques across the groups. We’ll do this several times so that you gain exposure to a wide range of situations and approaches.
Examples of some of the Scenario's you might discuss include:
  • Sponsors changing their minds too frequently
  • Influencing change within your Scrum team
  • Maintaining a connection to the "Big Picture"
  • Not having sufficient time to do ALL aspects of your role
Things that will surface include effective communication, better transparency, improved prioritization and valuation, increasing team collaboration, the importance of vision-setting, approaches for stakeholder management, and generally key aspects of the role and responsibilities of effective product ownership.
You’ll leave this hands-on session a better and much more situational Product Owner.

Learning Outcomes:
  • A quick reminder of the key roles & responsibilities of product owners - including the intersection with other roles
  • A simple conversation framework for initiating crucial conversations
  • A set of tips for more effective communication
  • Solid practice at engaging in situational conversations (common and challenging) for product owners


Speakers
avatar for Bob Galen

Bob Galen

Director, Agile Practices, Zenergy Technologies
Bob Galen is an Agile Methodologist, Practitioner & Coach based in Cary, NC. In this role, he helps guide companies and teams in their pragmatic adoption and organizational shift towards Scrum and other agile methodologies and practices. He is Director, Agile Practices at Zenergy... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 5

10:45

Increasing your team’s bus count: an interactive workshop (Todd Sedano)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Truck number or bus factor is “the size of the smallest set of people in a project such that, if all of them got hit by a truck, the project would be in trouble.” Disruptions routinely happen on software teams and have large impact on productivity. Teams thrive by actively sharing knowledge across a team and cross-training key skills.
In this workshop, you will assess how well your team is distributing knowledge within the team. Then you will discuss practices to help the team improve its ability to distribute knowledge. I have observed teams survive massive disruptions by following three collaborating development practices. We’ll discuss how to apply these practices to your team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will develop a proactive strategy for distributing knowledge throughout the team. In addition to the participant’s generated solution, participants will see how Pivotal’s practices of Continuous Pair Programming, Overlapping Pair Rotation, and Knowledge Pollination enable Pivotal teams to survive large disruptions. Teams might pretend that disruptive events are not going to happen to them, but that’s not a reality in software development techniques.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Todd Sedano

Todd Sedano

Associate Director, Pivotal


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Balboa/Mission Hills

10:45

TDD - It's About More Than Just the Tests (Jonathan Turner)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Test driven development is all the rage. But why do people choose to write their code in a test driven fashion? It's so their code will have tests, right? Ending up with tested code is a nice benefit of test driven development (TDD), but it's not the most compelling reason to choose TDD. The real reason to choose TDD is because it helps you write better code. Simpler, more elegant code that's easier to maintain and has fewer bugs. Who doesn't want that?
In this session we'll do a live coding demo showing how TDD works in action. We'll see the basic mechanics of TDD, and we'll also see how TDD helps us break apart the problem into solvable chunks and end up with a solution that is simpler and more elegant than we might have arrived at without TDD.
If you aren't super familiar with TDD and want to see how it works and how it can help make your code better, this session is for you.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the rules and mechanics of TDD.
  • Through a coding example, understand how using TDD can result in simpler, easier to understand and maintain code as well as a better solution overall.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Turner

Jonathan Turner

Software Craftsman, Pluralsight


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina E

10:45

Database DevOps: Strategies to Address DevOps' "Last Mile" (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Your organization is doing DevOps, but it still takes several weeks to make simple changes to your production databases? Yikes. There are a myriad of excuses - you're dealing with legacy data, there's significant technical debt, you have inadequate automated tests (if any), database changes are handled by "the data team", you don't have the tooling, and many more - but they're all starting to ring hollow. Data should be an important corporate asset, yet in practice it is rarely treated that way. Now it's time to "go the last mile" and bring databases into your DevOps strategy.
Database DevOps requires a significantly different mindset than traditional data management or just agile software development. Data professionals need to embrace changing requirements, light-weight modelling strategies, automated regression testing, continuous database integration and continuous deployment strategies. Agile developers need to embrace fundamental database skills, realizing that just because you've encapsulated database access doesn't mean you can ignore the design and implementation of what's been encapsulated. Then of course for operational databases we need real-time monitoring, resilient architectures, and security.
The techniques and support tools exist, and in this workshop we will explore the challenges around Database DevOps and what you need to do to overcome them.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the challenges surrounding databases within a DevOps environment
  • Identify environmental prerequisites to enable Database DevOps
  • Explore potential strategies for evolutionary database development

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Scott Ambler + Associates
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 8

10:45

Case Study: Successful Consultant-Free Agile Transformation (Doug Husovsky)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
When corporations undergo large-scale Agile transformations, they often turn to outside consultants to lead the planning and training, with some follow-up coaching. Reasons for doing so typically include a lack of in-house Agile expertise and/or availability of in-house Agile Coaches. In either of these scenarios, there will be a lack of continuity after outside consultants complete their engagement.
Doug, who developed and delivered the training, will explore how a small and only partially dedicated internal team was able to successfully deliver an Agile transformation program from the ground up. With a small group he created all the necessary materials and delivered a customized large-scale transformation to a division of 500 people forming over 50 new Agile teams supporting hundreds of customers in just a few months' time.
The Agile transformation included creation of all training materials, leadership alignments, reorganization of teams, physical realignments (seating), and delivery of training in a limited physical space. It also included ongoing coaching and training to ensure success.
Doug will present summarized success and failure points during the transformation while providing a roadmap that can be followed by others looking to undertake an in-house Agile transformation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Identification of in-house resource skill sets required to support a consultant-free Agile transformation
  • • Benefits of an internally led transformation to your organization
  • • Prerequisite identification of leadership support (Getting the right people in leadership on board early and keeping them on board!)
  • • Communication strategies to support transformations and reduce anxiety before, during and after transformations.
  • • Planning tips and tricks learned through this effort.
  • • Insights into the materials that will need to be created to support training efforts.
  • • An understanding of the need to include “Outside” teams including HR, Legal, Contracts, Marketing, and others.
  • • A roadmap of critical decision points in support of an Agile transformation.

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 9

10:45

How Agile is your legacy financial organisation? (Suresh Konduru)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Legacy financial organisations (Banking, Financial and Insurance sectors) still face some of the traditional challenges such as lower time to market, high costs of maintenance, hetero-platform systems. They also operate in regulatory and risk environments. Such organizations have an obvious need to transform to more nimble organizations in order to stay relevant. However, it is not an easy change. Enroute the transformation, they face multiple challenges. This could be due to their inherent cultures, leadership styles, team structures, diverse application portfolio etc.
The objective of this session is to explore such real world challenges and dysfunctions faced by the BFSI enterprises during Agile transformations. Also, how the enterprises have mitigated the challenges and emerged successful.
The speaker has more than 20 years of experience working with legacy financial organizations, hence the discussions will be based on real-world scenarios.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Discuss challenges faced by legacy financial organisations during Agile transformations, more collaboratively with the participants.
  • 2. Explore the options to mitigate such challenges, from the collective experiences of the participants.
  • 3. Hear out real examples on how Fortune 500 organisations have emerged successful in such circumstances.
  • 4. Know a leader's perspective in a legacy organisational transformation.
  • 5. Appreciate how the legacy industry is moving towards Agility given their constraints.


Speakers
avatar for Suresh Konduru

Suresh Konduru

Suresh is is a seasoned coach and trainer, with a global spread of Agile coaching and training experience across India, USA, Netherlands, China, Belgium and Sweden. He has worked with large Agile transformation programs, especially in the BFSI industry. He has also Coached teams and... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Cardiff/Carlsbad

10:45

Clarity, Conditions, Constraints: An Alternative to Top Down Control (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many managers want to create an environment where teams take responsibility and initiative. Many executives want to build organizations that can respond quickly to the market and to customers. In spite of those sincere intentions, they often end up with organizations where people wait to be told what to do, and spend more time covering their asses than taking risks. They end up with organizations that seem frozen in a formation, impervious to change.
The fault is not in the managers and executives. For the most part, they are working with organizational concepts and tools what were designed to create stable, resistant to change organizations, ensure that people did what the were told, and maintain control from the top. Cascading objectives, silos, division of labor, discrete jobs, and all encompassing policies are well suited to create those results.
If you want different results, you need a different way to think about and shape your organization.
In this workshop, we'll explore the concerns that are common to all organizations --whether they have five employees or 50,000. We'll look at how Clarity, Conditions, and Constraints set up an organization (or a subset of an organization) for healthy, appropriate self-organization, and self-management.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How Clarity, Conditions, and Constraints enable flexible and adaptable organizations
  • How to create clarity in your organization
  • How to identify requisite conditions for team success
  • How constraints differ from policies
  • Insights into current organizational patterns, and some ideas how to shift patterns using Clarity, Conditions, Constraints

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina G

10:45

Improv for Learning: An Interactive Session Learning from Comedy Legends (Mary Lemmer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Want to be ready for anything that comes your way? Want to thrive in the face of uncertainty? Want to develop a process for learning and laughing throughout life? Or just want to get a taste of what Saturday Night Live cast members do?
Learn how to learn, how to fail with grace, and do it all with a smile during this interactive improv session.
Improv creates a psychologically safe place for experimentation, learning to make mistakes with grace, challenge ourselves and face our fears in a safe space, so that when we experience challenges in the “real world” we can also handle those mistakes and challenges with grace and courage.
During this session, we’ll do improv games and exercises, popularized by theatres that have trained the world’s best improvisers and comedians, including Tina Fey, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Amy Poehler, and more. It is an interactive session where there will be movement and participation from all participants, and it will be a lot of fun and laughter!
This session is targeted at managers and leaders inside the company who want to develop their own fearlessness and sense of play, as well as walk away with the tools and methodologies to inspire this fearlessness and sense of play amongst their teams.
Session attendees can expect to leave this session with:
  • Ideas for how to learn and inspire learning, with fun and laughter
  • Less fear
  • Having discovered how to bring the spirit of play into their daily adult lives and company
  • A methodology for learning and practicing failure, in a safe and fun environment
  • A way to handle changing environments and the changing learning needs of others
  • A strengthened ability to think quickly
  • Exercises and games they can play with their teams and families to share their ways of practicing failure and developing fearlessness
  • A huge smile on their face!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to learn and inspire learning, with fun and laughter
  • Leave with less fear and learn how to act with courage in your work and life
  • Learn how to bring the spirit of play into your daily adult lives and company
  • Learn a methodology for learning and practicing failure, in a safe and fun environment
  • Learn ways to handle changing environments and the changing learning needs of others
  • Leave with a strengthened ability to think quickly
  • Learn exercises and games you can play with your teams and families to share their ways of practicing failure and developing fearlessness
  • Leave with a huge smile on your face!


Speakers
avatar for Mary Lemmer

Mary Lemmer

Founder, Improv4
Mary Lemmer is an entrepreneur, improviser, comedian,and writer. Mary is the founder of Improv4, an improv training company specializing in cultivating leadership and team building skills for companies, teams and leaders. | | Mary has helped dozens of companies, including Plenty... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

10:45

SESSION FULL: Lightning Talks 2 (Peter Green)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
  1. Simple tool to help you develop a pool of 'High Performing' Agile talent - Toby Rao
  2. So you want to be an Agile Coach? - Emilia Breton
  3. Deploying Agile is ultimately self defeating. - Simon Powers
  4. #NoEstimates getting executive buy-in! - Christopher Lucian
  5. How retrospectives lead to business agility - David Horowitz
  6. Hackathons, Avocados, and Coffee Shops: Facilitating Innovation Through Creative Events - Yevgeniya Kopeleva
  7. Why agile is not enough and why we need to expand our agile horizon for being agile truly - Jutta Eckstein
  8. Dynamic re-teaming and Agile - Yogita Dhond
  9. Everything You Need to Know About the Neuroscience of Planning in 7 Minutes - Shannon Mason
  10. Thing Three - The Power of Peer Coaching - William Kammersell
  11. Breaking bad agile transformations, in 5 minutes - David Morris
  12. Practice TDD with Cyber-Dojo Seb Rose
  13. Agile Coach Camps - Improving Your Skills - Paul Boos
  14. Better Lunches - Llewellyn Falco

Learning Outcomes:
  • Lightning Talks 2


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

10:45

Business Value Estimation (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Most scrum teams create effort estimates, often using story points. As a product owner, you also want to have an estimate of the business value of each user story. Business value estimates help you create a more rational backlog and maximize the value the team delivers.
This workshop explores the art and science of estimating the business value of user stories. Participants will gain an understanding of the essence of business value, and why it is more complex than just revenue or profit. Then we will then learn a surprisingly simple technique to estimate and quantify business value.

Learning Outcomes:
  • After completing this workshop, participants will be able to...
  • • Facilitate exercises with stakeholders to define and quantify “business value” in their context
  • • Articulate key components of business value beyond basic monetary terms
  • • Apply two different methods for assigning numeric business value to user stories
  • • Understand how backlog ordering and sprint planning are enhanced by the assignment of numeric business value to user stories

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego C

10:45

Ask Me Almost Anything - Ash Coleman (Ash Coleman)

Abstract:
Ash Coleman is currently working as an Engineering Manager in Quality in Silicon Valley, but her journey there is less than linear. She has been known in the community to raise difficult conversations about the many "others" that the field has stumbled on for years. From her forward approach to Diversity within Engineering and professional spaces, to her past as a Culinarily trained Chef before having switched careers, Ash speaks about all of that and every in between. Creating trainings, workshops, actionable process changes, crafting documents, coaching, and lending support, Ash is on a quest to find the way to a better working space that is accessible to herself and all of the other "others" that are interested and looking for belonging in Engineering.
If you find yourself wondering how you yourself fit into your role, how to include others who lack or are struggling with feeling a sense of belonging in your org, are interested in diversity and inclusion, gender equality, LBGTQ inquiries, or more tactical topics such as agile diversity, diversity transformation, testing, and career switching, let's have a chat!

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for Ash Coleman

Ash Coleman

Engineering Manager, Credit Karma
Ash, a former chef, put recipes aside when she began her career in software development, falling back on her skills in engineering she acquired as a kid building computers with her brother. A progressive type, Ash has focused her efforts within technology on bringing awareness to... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

10:45

Are We Agile? Fundamental Patterns of Agility (Daniel R Greening)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agility powers the most innovative and successful celebrities, teams, and companies. Like them, you can innovate rapidly and succeed anywhere, if you understand and apply deep fundamentals. But a certificate course does not teach you fundamental agility, just as a Certified Public Accountant course does not teach you economics. Some of us have gone far beyond the "developing software" premise of the Agile Manifesto, to drive our companies, marketing departments, and careers with agility. We operate intuitively, informed by the philosophy of agility.
What invariant concepts lie at agile's core? Few can tell you. As a result, charlatans can all themselves agile, and critics can dismiss agile as religion or fad.
This workshop teaches you the fundamental patterns of agility, and how to compose them for the win. Using those patterns, you can rapidly diagnose problems that inhibit success, you can make thoughtful tradeoffs, prescribe improvements, and, sometimes, with sadness, identify lost causes.
The workshop is based on original research. Collaborating with pals, I decomposed popular agile frameworks, and re-synthesized the components by their contribution to rapid adaptation. It's no coincidence that agile practitioners are attracted to other frameworks. Scrum, Extreme Programming (XP), Lean Startup, DevOps, Lean Manufacturing, Getting Things Done, Theory of Constraints, Design Thinking, Pomodoro, Grit, LeSS, Scrum@Scale, Nexus and SAFe share most of the fundamental patterns of agility.
Well-written patterns teach intuition. Patterns combine contexts and problems with thoughtful solutions. These interconnected agile patterns form a "pattern language" that defines the whole of agility. Pattern languages have been used in urban planning, software development, and other fields to express deeper holistic wisdom. I believe these patterns are approaching that ideal. Some agile coaches and I have seen good results when we incorporated the patterns into our teaching and practice.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Rapidly assess the agility of a person, team, or company
  • Diagnose key factors inhibiting greater agility and provide guidance to improve
  • Establish a long-term "dominant superordinate goal" and find objective metrics to gauge progress
  • Craft full-span experiments to rapidly identify risks and opportunities
  • Measure outcomes with leading indicators to focus attention on techniques that work
  • Adapt both activities and metrics (double loop learning) to discoveries
  • Encourage collective responsibility to more rapidly adapt to changing work loads
  • Succeed in challenging efforts, whether personal, team or corporate
  • Distinguish different agile practices (Scrum, XP, Lean Startup, etc.) based on simple patterns

Attachments:


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

10:45

The Joy of Proving Yourself Wrong: A Case Study in A/B Experimentation (Jenny Wanger)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Getting A/B experimentation to work for you is a science that goes beyond purchasing a tool. It's about creating a culture of learning and celebrating failed hypotheses alongside the winning ones. It's about putting processes in place to make sure you're following a rigorous testing regimen. And along the way, it's about making a lot of mistakes.
Through this interactive workshop, we'll go through a case study of a recent experiment my team ran at SpotHero and you'll have a chance to set the variables up yourself. We'll learn about how complicated these experiments can get and how to discover if you've made an error in your test setup. We'll look at what you should do to build on the momentum of a failed experiment. You'll learn why the only way an experiment can go wrong is bad data, not bad ideas.
A/B testing is complicated and even the best teams make mistakes. This session is aimed at experienced practitioners who want to improve team processes, learn how to design tests so that they provide accurate data, and recover from those errors when they do happen. It's about finding the joy in a failed experiment and making sure each test is set up so you're guaranteed to learn something. A strong experimentation regimen can take you from amateur tinkerer to data-driven guru, where every losing variation makes you smile.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why you should test everything: The power of measuring the success and failure of everything you release.
  • Hypothesis framing: How to use qualitative research to set up your hypotheses for A/B experimentation
  • Different kinds of tests: When to use multivariate versus single-variation experiment structures and what they are
  • Iterative experimentation: Why set up iterative experiments where you run one test and follow it immediately with a new variation, and how that should change the way you design your tests
  • All the things that can go wrong: Different, unexpected ways your experiment can be ruined due to poor data, and why the only way an experiment can really fail is inconclusive data, not a losing variation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Wanger

Jenny Wanger

Product Manager, SpotHero
Jenny Wanger is a senior product manager for SpotHero, a top-ranking app that helps people park easier. Her years of product management experience prior to that include running the developer experience team at Arity, a startup founded by Allstate in downtown Chicago, and consulting... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina F

11:00

Agile Advice

Abstract:
We all need advice from time to time, and having someone to bounce ideas off or share their thoughts can lead to great insights and uncover creative personalized solutions. At Agile2018, we are excited to provide Agile Advice as an offering tailored for you to bring your toughest questions, your biggest puzzles, and your worst hurdles.

Agile Advice is a 20 minute one-on-one conversation with an expert ready to offer their time and insight to those that are looking for a bit of advice. This diverse group of experts will be ready to chat about a wide range of agile topics such as culture, training, engineering, frameworks and leadership. Make sure to stop by and sign up for actionable advice on your Agile journey.

Tuesday August 7, 2018 11:00 - 15:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Tuesday August 7, 2018 12:00 - 14:00
Pacific Ballroom

12:00

Sponsor Exhibits

Abstract:
Sponsors are an important element of the Agile2018 Conference. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in the Pacific Ballroom at Agile2018.

Tuesday August 7, 2018 12:00 - 15:45
Pacific Ballroom

14:00

Agile Road Trip, Lessons from a Coach at Toyota (Bob Tarne)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
While Toyota is known for the Lean practices developed as part of the Toyota Production System, their prowess on the production line didn't equate to a well-running Information Systems (IS) department. An Agile transformation began in 2016 to move the North America IS group from waterfall practices to Scrum. This report is based on the experiences of one of the coaches working on that transformation, the challenges he faced, and the tools he used to move the transformation in the right direction. The discussion will include how concepts such as Crew Resource Management (CRM), High Reliability Organizations (HROs), Red Teaming, and the ZoneFive tool from AGLX were used to build high-performing teams. CRM was first developed to reduce human error that had led to a number of airplane crashes in the 1970s and is cited as one of the reasons there were no causalities in the 2009 crash of US Air flight 1549. HROs developed out of complex, highly volatile environments such as aircraft carriers and nuclear reactors that are able to avoid catastrophes in spite of their volatility. The discussion will also talk about how the Scrum@Scale model was applied and the challenges in getting managers and executives engaged as chief product owners and metascrum participants.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • - How to overcome group-think by using a tool such as "think-write-share" and practicing good planning poker techniques
  • - How to plan a sprint better by applying critical thinking during the planning process
  • - How to use the military briefing approach to "debrief" after activities such as stand-ups to assess how effective they are being run
  • - The importance of working with all levels of management during a transformation to create the environment where teams can be high-performing

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 14:30
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

14:00

Agile FTW: Competitive Advantage and Happiness Through Business Agility (John Hughes)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We all know the story of how the Agile ‘Software Development’ Manifesto emerged out of Snowbird in February of 2001. And we all know that Agile is still the current best practice for software development. What remains to be fully realized is that Agile has evolved to a best practice for business in general; a way of life for that matter.
I had the privilege of bringing Agile into business over the last couple years. In that time, I introduced my executive leadership team to Business Agility. After getting executive participation in the inaugural Business Agility conference in Feb 2017, we partnered together to seek the benefits of a comprehensive Business Agility adoption.
Using our corporation’s strategic planning and execution effort to exemplify, I will share with you how the Agile mindset and practices apply to business and drive the highest impact possible towards the most valuable goals and initiatives. Modern leadership and business practices such as those under the Business Agility umbrella bring a value-driven, data-driven, efficient focus on impactful delivery.
  • Revenue and growth accelerate as we focus the company’s resources on delivering in the most valuable way
  • Corporate processes lean out as we remove wasteful bottlenecks, saving money, time, and providing competitive advantage
  • Employees are more capable as corporate practices are more meaningful and less taxing
  • Back-office tools and data are integrated into a unified experience allowing real-time awareness and predictive analytics, increasing effective decision-making and enabling empowerment at lower levels
  • Employees are happier. Customers are happier. The corporate bottom-line reflects this happiness.
I am enthusiastic about the spread of Agile beyond IT. And as such, I am excited to illustrate the brilliance of Business Agility to session participants, adding examples from my most recent corporate transformation effort to exemplify the mindset and practices presented. It is my interest that participants come away with an understanding of how Agile mindset and practices benefit the corporate back office as much as they do software delivery, and how their companies can begin to benefit too by applying what they learn from this presentation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How Agile mindset and practices benefit the corporate back office as much as they do software delivery
  • Specific practices, tools, and integrations that can be used to enable Business Agility
  • How your company can begin to benefit too by applying what you learn from this presentation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Hughes

John Hughes

Senior Director, Corporate Agility, Sevatec
John Hughes is the Senior Director of Sevatec’s Corporate Agility practice. He is an organizational transformation coach, highly motivated by experiencing positive change and continuous growth in people, systems, and himself. | | A 20-year veteran of software development and delivery... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Balboa/Mission Hills

14:00

Agile Retrospectives (Samantha Laing, Karen Greaves)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
This will be a 75 minute interactive session that will explore the 5 phases of a retrospective by actively participating in one. Instead of learning how to do a retrospective through theory, workshop participants will learn by doing

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. To practically engage in the 5 phases of a retrospective
  • 2. Understand the importance and value of retrospectives
  • 3. Learn some different techniques to use

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Karen Greaves

Karen Greaves

Product Delivery Manager, Trade Me
I love meeting new people so come introduce yourself. Check out www.growingagile.co.nz to see what I look like, or just listen for the loudest person in the room :)
avatar for Samantha Laing

Samantha Laing

Agile Coach, Growing Agile
My personal motto is ‘be brave’, and I embody this by taking on challenges one small step at a time. | Most of my career has been in the IT industry, specifically Software Development. Nowadays I find myself coaching others with a passion for agile. | I love the outdoors... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina D

14:00

Addressing Squabbles within the Agile Community Using Design Thinking & Improv (Scott Showalter)

Abstract:
Agile squabbles are disagreements and points of friction within the Agile community. The power of design thinking with improvisation is explored in this fast-paced and laughter-filled experience geared towards resolving the poignant problems, disputes, or infighting amongst practitioners. This is a learning experience that aims to enhance how you solve problems through exercises in empathy, ideation, collaborative design, testing assumptions, and learning through experimentation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Presidio 1 & 2

14:00

Foundations of Coaching and Facilitation - Workshop (Caroline Sauve)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Calling all coaching and facilitation apprentices!!! Whether you are taking your first steps into coaching and facilitation, or are seeking to grow your intuitive mental model around coaching and facilitation - this workshop will strengthen your foundation for these practices.
This workshop will establish coaching principles and practices that include: What is coaching? How is it different from mentorship and management? When should I coach? What is the structure of a coaching conversation?
Participants will then be invited to develop key coaching and facilitation skills safely with a small team of peers. Together we will explore different levels of active listening and powerful questions - all while providing a context for participants to gain feedback on their application of these practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. What is coaching? When to coach? -> In particular we'll clearly distinguish coaching stance from mentorship and management stance.
  • 2. What are the skills necessary for a coaching? -> Focused applied practice and muscle building on foundational coaching skills: active listening (3 levels), powerful questions (3 levels).
  • 3. How do we apply these new skills to facilitation? -> Translating coaching skills into a team based context.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Sauve

Caroline Sauve

Coach, InsideOutAgile
Thoughtful curiosity leads to insight. Whether speaking or facilitating sessions at conferences or blogging on https://insideoutagile.ca/ – I am energized when creating connections, building capabilities, and sharing ideas towards creating a more respectful and compassionate work... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 6

14:00

Let’s Stop Making People Feel Stupid (Clare Sudbery)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
“I know nothing.”
“I am an impostor.”
Have you ever had these thoughts? Have you wondered why? Would you like to reduce the frequency of those thoughts in yourself, your colleagues and people who are yet to even consider joining your profession?
Have you ever heard people say anything like this:
“Can you believe, I just interviewed this dev, and they didn’t even know what a Z was?”
Over my 18-year software career, I have heard this kind of thing countless times. It is said derisively, scornfully, impatiently. And every time those words are said, we lose both existing and potential members of our profession. We lose them because they feel stupid; because they believe they can’t keep up; because they’re terrified that people are saying the same about them. Or we don’t lose them, but they increase the amount of jargon they use, to prove how clever they are. Their colleagues struggle to understand them, but they pretend they understand, to avoid looking stupid… and so on.
If somebody already feels like they don't "fit in", then this kind of pressure and insecurity can be the final shove that persuades them to leave the profession or not try and join in the first place. Under-represented groups are particularly impacted by this intellectual elitism. Indeed ALL software professionals are impacted.
This is a passionate talk. It's a topic I feel strongly about. It's a topic with strong personal resonance. I want to help you build strong, capable, diverse, multi-functional teams that can happily embrace any challenge. To do this, we need to nurture our teams by building confidence and eradicating insecurity. This is a talk full of practical examples and suggestions of how you can keep en eye out for insecurities in your colleagues, and do everything you can to avoid them being deepened.
We know that everybody has knowledge gaps. There are thousands of different paths through software development, touching thousands of different combinations of technologies and skills. On a day-to-day level we have to specialise on one task at a time. The skills we don’t need right now are necessarily forgotten, or delegated to someone else. And that’s fine.
Let’s stop making people feel stupid. Instead of judging people for their ignorance, let’s help them to feel excited about all the new things they’ll discover. Instead of saying “For God’s sake, you don’t know that?” let’s say “Fantastic! Lucky you. You get to learn something. What can I do to help?”

Learning Outcomes:
  • Know how to nurture your colleagues and build their confidence
  • Understand the vicious cycle of entrenched insecurities
  • Understand what makes people feel insecure, and what impact that has on both teams and individuals
  • Know how to recognise the difference between "They don't know what I know" and "They don't know anything useful".

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Clare Sudbery

Clare Sudbery

Lead Consultant Developer, ThoughtWorks
Clare Sudbery is a lead consultant developer for Thoughtworks, and particularly enjoys the mentoring side of her job. She is a maths graduate with 18 years of software experience, plus a few extra years thrown in doing everything from full time novelist to high school maths teacher... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego C

14:00

Making Our Mark!: Drawing Together to Enhance Collaboration (Ellen Grove, Sue Johnston)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Co-creating drawings helps teams enhance their systems thinking abilities by really seeing the big picture. A group of people talking around a whiteboard is an effective way to share ideas across a team. Imagine how much richer the conversation is when everyone on the team has a marker in their hand and is actively contributing! Graphic visualization is an important tool for talking about new ideas, generating insights and developing shared understanding. In a team context, drawing is a thinking tool rather than an artistic endeavour. When everyone participates in creating drawings, all team members can see how things fit together and what mental models are at play in defining the situation. And, by drawing together, the team is collaboratively creating meaningful records that are being validated and updated.
Join Ellen and Sue for a visual adventure into how teams can collaboratively visualize ideas and make sure that everyone at the table has a voice. In this workshop, we will warm up with some basic doodling skills practice. No drawing experience is required to take part in this session: if you can hold a marker, we can teach you the skills needed to put your ideas on paper. Together we'll consider the ways that collaborative drawing can be used to enhance group work, and we will share practical activities that you can take back to use with your team for setting the stage, gathering information, and sharing stories.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to:
  • explain how collaborative drawing can be used to facilitate team discussions and enhance group work
  • build (and teach) simple doodling skills to encourage everyone to participate in collaborative drawing
  • faciltate a practical collaborative visualization exercise with your team


Speakers
avatar for Ellen Grove

Ellen Grove

business agility coach, Agile Partnership
Ellen Grove is an Agile coach and trainer who helps teams to do better work by coaching them to cocreate the circumstances in which they can work productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 18 years’ experience leading software testing, development... Read More →
avatar for Sue Johnston

Sue Johnston

Idea Monger, It's Understood/Leanintuit
Sue Johnston's interests have always been communication and teamwork. After a journalism career, she held senior management roles at two Canadian banks, where she was involved in large scale change initiatives and technology implementations. That's where she discovered that the critical... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Cardiff/Carlsbad

14:00

Backlog Confessions- Technical User Stories (Candase Hokanson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
These are my confessions…of the backlog. What dirty little secrets is your team's backlog keeping? Is it abusing or not using spikes appropriately, retroactively updating story point estimates, rolling over stories from sprint to sprint or even writing user stories where systems are the users?
In this talk, we'll first give a quick overview of common backlog confessions then we will focus on the technical user story confession. In agile, we want all of our requirements to be about the user (As a [some type of user], I want [some functionality], so that I can [achieve some benefit].) as they should be because it forces the teams to think about the use and value of every single thing they are building. But what happens if your product doesn't have direct users, like an API or middleware layer? How does the team and the PO stay true to agile principles in the backlog (and it's not by making our systems sentient!)?
During this interactive session, we will discuss what a technical user story is, how it differs from the generic user story and when it should be used. Then we'll have a few hands-on exercises using a simulated technical project and visual models to identify when the technical user story format is preferable and how to write one.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand what a technical user story is
  • Understand how a technical user story differs from traditional user stories
  • Learn when to use technical user stories
  • Understand how to derive technical user stories from visual models and traditional user stories

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Candase Hokanson

Candase Hokanson

Senior Product Manager, Seilevel
Candase Hokanson is a Senior Product Manager at Seilevel and a PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner who trains and Coaches, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, and business analysts on Agile approaches as well as championing products in those roles for clients. She works with teams to unite... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

14:00

Bashing Cultural Monsters Using Blameless Continuous Integration (Vivek Ganesan)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Does your organization frown upon Build Breakers? Do you see a lot of “Who broke the build now?” emails? Do your team members hesitate to commit their code for the fear of causing a build failure?
If you wish to know what you can do to make the situation better, this session is for you.
Continuous Integration (shortly CI) is a powerful way to identify and eliminate certain risks, particularly when multiple teams are rallying towards a planned release. Even if you are not working on a planned release, Continuous Integration will help you to cut-out a release sooner than you would if you did not have CI.
When organizations or teams start adopting Continuous Integration for the first time, they develop an untold habit to chastise the build breaker, whenever a build breaks. Most of the time, the reprimanded build breaker is a person and not a thing, a machine or a process. This session aims to create a dialogue around the level of control a developer has on the build failures and how we can create meaningful outcomes by not blaming the developer who broke the build.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Effects of blame on effectiveness of CI
  • Ideas and Techniques to avoid blame while implementing CI
  • Tried and tested Metrics to build a Blameless CI culture


Speakers
avatar for Vivek Ganesan

Vivek Ganesan

Agile/DevOps Coach, SolutionsIQ-Accenture
Vivek Ganesan is the author of the book Blameless Continuous Integration and a secret ‘super hero’ at SolutionsIQ who helps organizations, teams and individuals to be better and happier than they are. He lives in Hyderabad and spends his leisure time envisioning and writing about... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina F

14:00

Principles of Self-Service Infrastructure (Nicolas Paez)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The management of development and test environments is major concern when trying to optimize the value stream of any software development project. In this context, implementing Self-Service Infrastructure may help your organization to simplify the management of these environments. In this session we will review the foundations and benefits of Self- Service Infrastructure. We will also review the most common challenges and how to overcome them using some patterns. Finally we will see a set of tools to implement this practice and a couple of demos that will provide a better understanding of principles behind the tools.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * A set of strategies that will help you to implement Self-Service Infrastructure
  • * A brief introduction to commonly used tools to implement this practice


Speakers
avatar for Nicolas Paez

Nicolas Paez

I am a software engineer with several years of experience in software development. I love teaching, I teach software engineering at the university. I work as an independent software engineer helping teams to adopt technical practices. | I do believe that the main complexity in creating... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 5

14:00

Driving Enterprise-Scale Innovation with the Scaled Agile Framework (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The marketplace is changing so quickly that we need a paradigm shift in how we enable innovation in the large enterprise. When an innovation culture is relegated exclusively to the startup, our biggest brands—those who employ most of the people and drive most of the world's economy—are at risk for their very survival. And yet, sometimes it seems that the larger and more successful the company, the more difficult it is to innovate. Perhaps this is because, as Geoffrey Moore notes, "Momentum is the residue of past innovation efforts, left unchecked it will consume the resources needed for future innovation."
Fortunately, Lean and Agile development gives us many of the tools we need to apply that momentum to new innovations, and to do so at enterprise scale. And now, the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe®) and other industry trends bring new mindsets and thinking to bear on this challenge.
In this tutorial, Dean Leffingwell will illustrate how seemingly disparate practices—like Agile, scaled Agile, Lean Startup, Lean UX, DevOps, and Continuous Delivery—need not be separate initiatives, but rather a continuum that helps enterprises delivery more innovative solutions at a velocity they could only imagine before. From Minimum Viable Product to Minimum Marketable Feature, to the-smallest-package-that-can-be efficiently-released-into-production, Dean will discuss how reducing batch size enables fast feedback, and is the one elemental practice that binds them all.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Insights as to how to drive innovation in the larger enterprise
  • • Overview of how Agile development, Lean Startup, Lean UX and DevOps work together to foster faster time-to-market
  • • The secret of how small batch size accelerates innovation via fast and meaningful market feedback

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 9

14:00

Leadership Starts with Listening - Amplify Your Impact (Heidi Helfand)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Listening is power. By “tuning in” and applying self management and directed curiosity you can help others thrive and solve their own problems. Doing this not only leads to greater ownership, but also more leaders in your organization instead of “order takers”. In this interactive workshop I’ll teach you practical communication skills so you can become a more available and empowering coworker, friend and leader.

Learning Outcomes:
  • -Feel what it's like to stop giving advice and encourage others to solve their own problems - they can do it!
  • -Improve your listening skills with deliberate practice - learn "listening levels"
  • -Practice techniques to build self awareness for how you show up as a leader
  • -Learn questioning techniques to help others feel heard like asking open-ended "what" questions
  • -Help others feel acknowledged by paraphrasing and mirroring aka "active listening"
  • -Get a taste of what it's like to actually coach another person through a challenge instead of telling them what to do
  • -Experience conversations that show you how you can apply these leadership skills immediately to network better with others at this conference right when you leave the room

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Helfand

Heidi Helfand

Director, Engineering Excellence, Procore Technologies
Heidi Helfand is Director of Engineering Excellence at Procore Technologies, creators of cloud-based software for the construction industry. She is the author of the book Dynamic Reteaming: The Art and Wisdom of Changing Teams which challenges the notion that you need to keep your... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 8

14:00

The Trust Transaction: A Leader's Guide To Autonomy (Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"The best way you can find out if you trust someone is to trust them." - Ernest Hemmingway.
Moving from a group of directed individual contributors to an agile self-organizing, autonomous team is not always easy.
When organizations meet with confusion, frustration, or disappointment they may quickly retreat to command-and-control tactics.
It's understandable, since most people have never formally learned how to extend and receive trust. They over-extend or under-extend trust, they withdraw it quickly or fail to follow-up. They never learn how trustworthy and autonomous their teams are capable of being. They don't have a model of trust that they rely on, and they don't really think about trusting as a teachable/learnable skill.
This talk presents a simple model of trust as a set of goal-seeking skills, and practices we call Transactional Trust, based on empiricism and experimentation.
Some skills discussed and exposed:
  • Aligning on goals
  • Negotiating agreements
  • Embracing accountability
  • Putting curiosity before judgment
  • Managing expectations
Come learn this Transactional model for trust, work through hypothetical cases, and workshop some of your stories.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Handle trust in a transactional way
  • Teach the skill of trusting others
  • How (and whether) to adjust expectations
  • Manage the inherent risks of trusting others

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Anzeneer, Industrial Logic
Tim is a long-time programmer (since 1979), reviewer, speaker, writer. He has been active in many of the big changes in software over the past 36 years (including Design Patterns, Object-Oriented Design, and Agile software development). | | In addition to his contributions in "Clean... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego A

14:00

Overcoming Immunity to Change (Peter Green)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
When advised by their doctors that they need to change their habits or they will die of a heart attack, only three out of ten people can successfully make the changes requested. Hard changes are hard not because of a lack of desire or willpower, but because our brains evolved a natural immunity to change. Unexamined, this immunity puts the brakes on difficult personal and organizational changes.
In this session, attendees will learn how to use a simple set of practices to become aware of the hidden competing commitments that impede our ability to make meaningful change. These hidden competing commitments point to big assumptions that we have not yet challenged. The output of the process is a set of safe to fail experiments that help us challenge our big assumptions, easing our brains into new possibility.
So, come with an important personal change that you've been contemplating or struggling with, and leave with excitement about your experiment to finally break through!

Learning Outcomes:
  • The difference between an adaptive and a technical change
  • Why willpower doesn't work for adaptive changes
  • A simple tool to map our personal immunity to change & discover small experiments to help us finally move forward


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina G

14:00

Rekindle the Magic of Agile (Olaf Lewitz)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What we did in the 90s seemed unthinkable, given the prevalent business wisdom of the time. Labelling it "Agile" in 2001 did not make it any more understandable to the mainstream. Even today, we see people in classrooms or organisations who believe we are talking about a different world...
And we are: Agility at its best is like magic to others. Let's use that for a different kind of learning! I want to explore magical metaphors with you as a method for reflection and learning.
Let's use some Headology, redeem the Dark Lord, employ the Patronus Effect, understand Horcruxes and Apparition... The magical literature is full of metaphors that we can employ for our work in changing organisations. Metaphors make complex things simpler to communicate.
I'm going to take you through several stories of magical, life-changing experiences, and let you explore your own using the power of metaphor and Clean Language. You'll leave with increased confidence in what only you can do: your magic.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Increased confidence and courage that what we are doing is great and valuable and doesn't need fitting in.
  • Employ Clean Language questions to support Learning in a new and very effective way.
  • Embrace and explore how what you have been doing is magical - inexplicable, surprising, and awesome!
  • Know that it doesn't stop being magic just because we know how it's done.
  • Feel ready to pursue a strategy to introduce agile that uses awe and wonder and inspiration rather than fulfilling structure and process expectations.
  • Dare to be unsafe, unfitting, and ridiculous.


Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

14:00

A Case Study in Failure: Portfolio Management in the Money Transfer Industry (Andrew McKnight)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
150 project on-going at any one time, each have a 10 month timeline to delivery, and new projects are starting on a weekly basis...How much do you think gets done? After being recruited to begin a portfolio and demand management group within IT Strategy, the future looked bright. The enterprise wanted to get to a place where delivery was predictable, projects were prioritized, commitments were met, and executives were happy.
These are great goals and ideas as long as the executive team is aligned to the same goals, and are willing to work cross-functionally to achieve the corporate objectives...this wasn't the case.
Andy will explain the custom scaled framework he created, the change management approach, the desired outcomes, and where along the way either he failed to make the critical connections, or the warning signs he missed.
He will discuss the failures at the IT Level, Executive level, portfolio level, and the impacts that context switching and a silo'd prioritization approach has on the ability to deliver value.
Hopefully, you can take these lessons and catch them so they don't lead to your demise; as they did his!

Learning Outcomes:
  • - A Unique Scaled Framework for organizing work across a multi-billion dollar enterprise
  • - Concept for change management to introducing new corporate functions.
  • - Key warning signs that change isn't occurring
  • - Alternative approaches that might have led to success.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrew McKnight

Andrew McKnight

Agile Practice Lead, MATRIX Resources
Andy McKnight has over 20 years’ experience in an Agile environment—from his 12 years as a United States Marine to co-founding an enterprise performance management software company, and leading Agile adoptions and transformations within Fortune 500 companies, and in multiple organizations... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina E

14:00

Ask Me Almost Anything - Elisabeth Hendrickson (Elisabeth Hendrickson)

Abstract:
Elisabeth Hendrickson, AKA @testobsessed on Twitter, did her first real Agile project in 2004 and was ruined for working any other way. After over a decade helping organizations improve their agility as a consultant, she joined Pivotal in 2012 to work on Cloud Foundry. These days she's VP R&D for data products at Pivotal where she applies everything she's learned about agile and lean daily. She is known for her Word Count agile transformation simulation and as the author of Explore It! (published by Pragmatic Bookshelf). She is also a recipient of the 2010 Agile Alliance Gordon Pask Award and a past Agile Alliance board and program committee member.
What might you ask about in this session? Suggested topics include: how to achieve fast feedback cycles and eliminate test phases even on incredibly complex massive legacy systems; how large independent test teams can (ironically) result in lower quality; how to grow a culture of agility; or how Pivotal applies Extreme Programming at scale for our enterprise products. Along the way you're likely to hear about pragmatism v. expediency; being nice v. being kind; and why -- despite the moniker "testobsessed" -- Elisabeth doesn't actually self-identify as a tester.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

14:00

Test Coach vs Agile Coach vs Professional Coach: Going deeper with coaching (Toby Sinclair)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Test Coach is becoming a popular job title within the Testing Community. This is no surprise given the rise of Agile Coaches within the IT Industry. But what is a Test Coach? How is it different to an Agile Coach? What type of coaching does a Test Coach do?
What might surprise you, is that many Test and Agile Coaches are not really coaching.
18 Months ago, I started working as an Agile Coach which led me to a disorientating dilemma. I was confident I knew lots about Agile and had previously called myself a “Test Coach” but I was soon to learn that I had a shallow understanding of Coaching and I was not alone. I’d come to realise that many self-identified test coaches, including myself, were really acting as Mentors rather than Coaches. Advice and instruction was more common than active listening or powerful questions. In fact, I hadn’t even realised Mentoring and Coaching were not that same thing!
In this talk, I will share the vital lessons that have led me to a deeper understanding of what Coaching is and what is means for your Test coaching practice. I will share my early experiences of coaching and some embarrassing stories from these early attempts. I’ll share what you should look out for in a good test coach. Finally, I’ll share my experience of undertaking a Professional Coaching course and accreditation with the ICF (International Coaching Federation).
I started out on my journey keen to understand how coaching could equip me with the best ways to help others. However, what I didn’t realise is that this would be more of a journey inwards, to a greater awareness of myself. I found that only first growing myself could I best serve others and being coached was an important part of enabling that growth.
I hope to inspire you by sharing my real-life experience. You will leave with practical insight into how to become a coach, be coached or grow further in becoming a test coach.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Understand differences between Test Coach, Agile Coach and Professional Coach
  • • Understanding of how coaching and mentoring are not the same
  • • Reflection on your current coaching approach
  • • Coaching techniques you can use within your test coaching practice


Speakers
avatar for Toby Sinclair

Toby Sinclair

Personal and Team Coach


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

14:00

Just In Time Solutioning: Are you Agile enough to abandon your Agile Framework? (Robert Woods)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Are you tired of being locked into a single framework that fits what you do only sometimes? Are you tired of someone standing by mandating not only how you work but measuring your effectiveness in it? Think you are already "Agile" minded enough and don't need someone with a long line of expensive certifications to tell you how to develop software? Let's find out!
Since Agile concepts were formalized we have experienced an onslaught of what you might call "Frame-Bots". Frameworks we are told will increase our ability to deliver software if we robotically step through them and don't deviate to the right or left even when it makes sense to do so. The problem we encounter is that one size does not fit all and teams have a hard enough time finding agility without being constrained in how they operate. Conversely, some accidentally found that a more organic way to operate based on their team makeup, product and flow was actually a better overall solution than the one they were about to adopt. We call this scenario "Just In Time Solutioning".
In this workshop, Robert Woods, National Agile Practice Director with Matrix, will be experimenting with attendees through a series of exercises which demonstrate the theory of Just In Time Solutioning (JITS). This concept has been used in real practice to create workflow based on immediate need. In some cases it has completely replaced the Scrums and Kanbans and has the potential of making other, more fixed and structured, frameworks obsolete in the future of Agile software development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * A comprehensive understanding of Just In Time Solutioning
  • * The benefits of creating a working method on the fly vs. the learning curve and adoption of a known framework.
  • * How to measure the effectiveness of a JITS method.
  • * Areas in which the JITS method changes the perception of framework development and learning.


Speakers
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Director National Agile Practice, MATRIX
Robert Woods serves as Director of the National Agile Practice at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 20 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

14:00

Business Agility Lab

Abstract:
Did you know that over half of Agile teams have issues with development and business people working together effectively? A core principle behind the Agile Manifesto is that they must do so daily throughout their project. Without adopting the Agile practice of daily collaboration, organizations struggle to deliver high customer value.

To address this, Agile Alliance will have a special area in the Agile Alliance Lounge: the Business Agility Lab. You’ll be able to participate in one of the widest retrospectives regarding understanding key positive and negative themes with Agile and business — the Narrative Project. You can add your voice by submitting a story or helping design experiments to amplify Agile principles inside your company.

Business leaders who understand the benefits of Agile will also be on hand to offer tips about improving your company’s Agile adoption process. Ray Arell (former Sr. Director at Intel), Heidi Musser (former VP & CIO at USAA), Hendrik Esser (VP at Ericson), and Steve Denning (former Director at World Bank) look forward to helping you!

The Business Agility Lab will be open Monday-Thursday from 10:30-16:30, with activities announced daily. We look forward to your participation!

Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:00 - 16:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

14:45

Yes, You CAN Let Your Teams Self-Organize! (Faye Thompson, Rob Reed)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
'Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.'
This principle from the Agile Manifesto - that teams are 'self-organizing' - may sound simple; however, supporting self-organizing teams can be one of the more significant cultural changes that a company in transformation faces. This is especially true in a large enterprise. You may see hierarchical structures and processes in place that prevent teams from aligning themselves around work to be done. You may even go so far as to think 'there's no way that would work here.' But we're here to say that it can work, and it can yield happy, productive teams who are more energized than ever before to deliver value for your customers.
We are scrum masters at American Electric Power, one of the largest electric utilities in the U.S., serving nearly 5.4 million customers in 11 states. The teams we are a part of have explored dynamic reteaming, self-selection, interviewing and hiring new team members, pairing and co-training in order to build the strongest teams possible for the work at hand. All of this was done with the support of our management, and through incremental change. While our path wasn't always easy, we did learn a lot along the way. We want to share our story so that you might start to envision a future reality in which your teams can be trusted with organizing themselves.
Read the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Team members enjoyed having a say in which team they would work on
  • --- The teams came up with the idea for adding the 3rd small team, which addressed a problem everyone had experienced for a long time, which was business partners having to wait a long time to get smaller projects that should have been quick-hit items. So in the end, they truly felt that they had collaborated on a solution that would satisfy their customers
  • --- There were people who wanted to be a part of that shorter/quick-hit work
  • --- Some team members really didn’t care which team they were a part of, and those were the most difficult situations to work through
  • Team members were able to voice concerns about missing skills that were needed in order to be cross-functional, and this provided an actionable guide for management to support whole-team learning
  • No one got hurt!
  • --- Often organizations state that this kind of self-selection exercise would be impossible because they envision contentious talks and playground behaviors
  • --- For our teams, it really was a collaborative, respectful exercise with one goal: let's organize ourselves in a way that makes the most sense for our company and our customers
  • --- All the discussions were positive, e.g., ‘You are really good at this – you should be on that team to help them learn that skill.’
  • --- The teams enjoyed the exercise, and now plan to re-evaluate and reteam as needed at the start of each new round of projects
  • The trust demonstrated by our manager and among the team members during this exercise has allowed and encouraged us to explore other areas of self-organization, e.g., team involvement in hiring decisions for new people, approval of new training requests, and designing our workspaces when we moved to a new office building
  • We have identified a few things we want to investigate and/or do differently next time:
  • --- Contractors were not included in the collaborative session this time, and there really was not a good reason to exclude them. Next time, they will be a part of the discussion.
  • --- No allowance was made for individual professional development goals, possibly due to the time of year when the reteaming occurred. We want to discuss what impacts any of this could have on performance goals.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Reed

Rob Reed

Scrum Master / Agile Coach, American Electric Power
15 year project manager turned scrum master for the last few years. Dipping my toe into coaching other teams at AEP. Passionate about agile mindsets, having fun and helping teams improve and progress along their agile journey. Check out my amazingly horrible retrospective drawings... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 14:45 - 15:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

15:15

Afternoon Break

Afternoon Break

Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:15 - 15:45
All Foyers

15:45

Agile & HR: Driving cultural change as one team (Melissa Rockman, Amy Jackson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is your HR department slowing you down? Do you feel like they’re a major impediment in your agile journey? We will tell the story of how Vistaprint’s HR team, now known as Talent + Experience Transformation Team (T+E), transformed from a traditional HR team of office dwellers and privacy screens to a more agile way of working (we don’t even have desks now!). We discuss what propelled our transformation, which parts of agile were easy to adopt and which parts didn’t work as well for our team, and the critical steps to make it happen. We’ll even share how our agile coaches are now embedded within our T+E team!
Join us as we retell this part of our agile transformation journey including the lessons learned and fun we had along the way.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How to adapt the agile manifesto to resonate with HR teams
  • How to overcome varying degrees of agile knowledge and experience
  • How we transformed our performance management process
  • How we established a culture of real-time feedback
  • How we’ve evolved the role of the leader in an agile environment
  • How to coach HR teams to work in smaller increments
  • How agile is becoming a part of our culture and how we work

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Amy Jackson

Amy Jackson

Agile Coach, Vistaprint
Amy is an Agile Coach at Vistaprint in Waltham, MA.  With nearly twenty years’ experience in Human Resources, and a passion for working with teams, she began exploring how the mindset and practices of Agile might help “non-technology” teams achieve high performance in order... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Rockman

Melissa Rockman

Agile Coach, Vistaprint
Melissa is an Agile Coach at Vistaprint in Waltham, MA.  Her background is in online marketing where she discovered how experimenting with agile led to a happier team and more value to the customer. From there, she completed Emergn's Expert Coaching Pathway and began coaching teams... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 16:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

15:45

Are you ready for the age of the organisational plasticity? (Manoel Pimentel Medeiros)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
We are living in a new economic and societal model. In this model, companies have to create highly individualised customer experiences and promote instant solutions for users' problems. Because of this, more organisations are becoming aware of the necessity to improve processes, structures, behaviours, and mindsets to create better products for users. This need is much more relevant than any other discussion regarding methods or frameworks. Most organisations need to adapt their business model to promote business agility. This is a vital element to survive in "The Now Economy".
Why is this so relevant for companies? Traditional models of management worked on the assumption that even in a complicated system, it was possible to predict behaviour when things changed. However, due to the high speed of innovation and strong competition, companies are being exposed to the effects of VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity).

How to be prepared for this challenge
The burning question in the now economy is how organisations can survive in a shared, collaborative, humanised, and on-demand economy. This is the reason why many companies are changing their organisational design to promote better experiences for users. The solution is not about adopting a particular framework, model, or method. The gist of this new approach is about whether we can create nimble organisations to respond to new social and economic disruptions quickly.
I have been observing behaviours in a few outstanding companies in Brazil and Australia over the last six years. The secret ingredient for the success of these companies is not that they are adopting agile or any other process; it is their ability to quickly rewire their organisational tissue to abandon old thoughts and continuously create new behaviours.

Neuroplasticity: The great inspiration
This type of behaviour is similar to neuroplasticity. In the book Neuroplasticity (the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series), Moheb Costandi states:
"Neuroplasticity simply means change in the nervous system, and is a collective term for all the processes that change the structure and function of the brain. Brains evolved to respond and adapt to the environment, and so neuroplasticity is an intrinsic property of nervous tissue, which occurs at all levels of organization, from the genetic to the behavioral."
As a broader concept, plasticity is about the quality of being easily shaped or moulded. This is the same quality we need in corporate systems. In order to survive and grow, modern companies should be able to change their structure and function. It should become an intrinsic property to respond and adapt to the environment. We can name this property "organisational plasticity".
Organisational plasticity is not a methodology or a framework or even a mindset. Organisational plasticity is a natural characteristic. It is similar to neuroplasticity in human brains. This ability has been present in all companies since their organisational genesis.
I was a director in a Brazilian company called RS Franchising (http://www.rsfranchising.com.br) when I started to notice this type of characteristic back in 2011 and 2012. RS Franchising was a small and young business specialising in managing and providing IT solutions for fast-food companies.
In this company, I noticed four key emergent attributes:
  • Nimble sensory network (democratisation of the information and decision making)
  • Rapid organisational learning
  • Constant renewing of practices
  • Lightweight functions to solve problems
I noticed similar attributes in other small businesses and startups in my work as Agile Coach in the following years. Because of that, I found the concept of neuroplasticity as the best metaphor to explain this kind of behaviour and essential element for Agile Transformations.
This phenomenon has been noticed by other people in different parts of the world as well (as you can see in this article written by Laurie Leitch - https://www.thresholdglobalworks.com/whats-organizational-plasticity-got-to-do-with-it/, and in this white paper produced by Sparknow - http://www.sparknow.net/downloads/Sparknow_Rewiring-the-Organisation.pdf).
However, I have to confess, most organisations neglect this natural characteristic when they start to grow/scale. Considering Agile is becoming something popular in large organisations, we have to think about how feasible it is to achieve real business agility without unlocking organisational plasticity. That is one the questions we are going to explore in this session. That is one the most important reflections regarding the future of Agile Software Development.
Innovative companies like Envato, Menlo Innovations, Google Ventures and Everlane are good examples of organisations who didn't bury its natural plasticity into heavy processes and unnecessary bureaucracy. In this session, we're going highlight what we can learn with those companies and, how we can translate these lessons into practices to foster the organisational plasticity.
In summary, I'll share in this session how we can translate different ideas into organisational practices to cultivate plasticity and why it is an essential ability for the next years.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How organisational plasticity can help companies to deal with complexity and uncertainty
  • How to use organisational plasticity to increase business agility
  • What are the pitfalls of applying organisational plasticity?
  • What are some tips to foster this behaviour?
  • Plasticity as an element to facilitate failure recovery
  • A few examples of practices to unlock and cultivate the organisational plasticity.



Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 16:15
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

15:45

Business Agility: Lessons from the Trenches (Kat Lee, Sriram Natesan)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile has been pervasive and proven to be successful for technology product development for more than two decades. Today more organizations are taking agile principles and practices and applying them outside of IT to their business as usual (BAU) activities such as marketing or strategy development. But how easy is this next generational aspect of Business Agility? Can an approach that was rooted in technology product development be successfully applied as an accelerator to achieve overall business efficiency and effectiveness?
In this session, different case studies, including a large Canadian insurance provider, will demonstrate lessons learned from organizations that have taken agile principles and practices to help them drive commercial impacts, build people and their capabilities, adoption of the right mindset and behaviors, and improve performance. Some of the questions that will be addressed:
  • What does business agility mean and why does it matter?
  • How can Corporate Functions such as HR, Finance, Risk and Marketing, which are often entrenched in traditional ways of working, become agile delivery centers?
  • Do agile practitioners need to “stay true” to the principles and practices they originally learned for technology in order to be effective in the business?
  • How should agile business teams be optimally structured to align with an enterprise agile COE?
  • What can leaders learn from others’ journeys so we can determine whether agile can truly thrive outside IT and be scaled across the organization?
If you are a Business Leader who is considering next steps on enterprise agility, organizational resilience, and a culture of adaptability, attend this session to learn valuable and pragmatic insights as you begin your own agile journey.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to adopt the agile principles and practices, and drive the mindset and culture outside of technology into business operations
  • How to structure and support your organization in this transformation
  • How to assess readiness and how to implement and adopt agile within the business through use of leading practices

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sriram Natesan

Sriram Natesan

Agile Transformation Consultant, Deloitte
Sriram helps teams and organizations deliver value to customers and business to accomplish their goals. He has a background in windows/web development and traditional Project Management prior to embarking on his Agile journey as a ScrumMaster. | | He has coached multiple teams, business... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Cardiff/Carlsbad

15:45

Agile Transformation Explained (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Leading a large-scale agile transformation isn’t about adopting a new set of attitudes, processes, and behaviors at the team level… it’s about helping your company deliver faster to market, and developing the ability to respond to a rapidly-changing competitive landscape. First and foremost, it’s about achieving business agility. Business agility comes from people having clarity of purpose, a willingness to be held accountable, and the ability to achieve measurable outcomes. Unfortunately, almost everything in modern organizations gets in the way of teams acting with any sort of autonomy. In most companies, achieving business agility requires significant organizational change.
Agile transformation necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how your company organizes for delivery, how it delivers value to its customers, and how it plans and measures outcomes. Agile transformation is about building enabling structures, aligning the flow of work, and measuring for outcomes based progress. It's about breaking dependencies. The reality is that this kind of change can only be led from the top. This talk will explore how executives can define an idealized end-state for the transformation, build a fiscally responsible iterative and incremental plan to realize that end-state, as well as techniques for tracking progress and managing change.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave the session with an understanding of how to build an organizational business case for agile, how to craft a transformation strategy and roadmap, how to build consensus internally for the transformation, and how to support the transformation with meaningful metrics that reinforce and support the changes.
  • Furthermore, we will go through how to structure the transformation, how to create an effective communication plan, and how to do all the necessary change management to make sure that everyone stays safe and supported through the transformation.


Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile
Mike Cottmeyer, LeadingAgile founder and CEO, is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, his company is dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina D

15:45

Addressing Squabbles within the Agile Community Using Design Thinking & Improv II (Scott Showalter)

Abstract:
Agile squabbles are disagreements and points of friction within the Agile community. The power of design thinking with improvisation is explored in this fast-paced and laughter-filled experience geared towards resolving the poignant problems, disputes, or infighting amongst practitioners. This is a learning experience that aims to enhance how you solve problems through exercises in empathy, ideation, collaborative design, testing assumptions, and learning through experimentation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Presidio 1 & 2

15:45

Agile Distributed Teams: Oxymoron or Option? (Mark Kilby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many surveys indicate that more organizations are practicing agile in distributed environments. Yet, agile is optimized for collocated people who can huddle around a problem space and closely collaborate on best solutions that will deliver value. But is collocation the only option these days? Does distributed always imply “dysfunctional”? Maybe the problem is how we think about the “working environment”. In this talk, we will share how we have experienced different work environments, principles and practices we have discovered after working for years with distributed agile teams in these environments and how re-thinking “distributed” and “co-located” allow these teams to thrive in an agile environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are distributed agile principles? How can these new principles be derived from original agile and lean principles and the distributed context?
  • Seeing the principles as a spectrum and how being outside of a “sweet spot” on the spectrum puts distributed teams in difficult environments.
  • What are different types of distributed agile teams? In what conditions do they work well and where are there pitfalls?
  • Understanding “hours of overlap” rather than time zones.
  • How to be aware of the richness of your distributed team communications.
  • How your distributed team communications is influenced by synchronous/asynchronous communications, hours of overlap and communicating beyond work.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
MARK KILBY has cultivated more distributed, dispersed, and virtual teams than colocated teams for more than two decades. Currently, Mark serves as an agile coach with Sonatype, a “remote first” software development company focusing on automation of software supply chains. Previously... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina F

15:45

Direct Communication - Pushing the Boundaries to Build Better Teams (Allison Pollard, Cherie Silas)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Coaching Agile Teams is all about asking questions and allowing them to self organize, right? Well, that's just part of the mission. During this session we will introduce participants to some anti-patterns that have arisen in the scrum master and agile coaching communities that make the coaching they are doing with their teams less powerful. Then, we'll talk about changes you can make incorporating more direct communication to bring more power to your coaching and push the boundaries to make teams better. Sometimes teams need more than just questions. They need scrum masters and coaches who are courageous enough to have the hard and direct conversations, challenge their decisions, push them to the next level. In this session, we will talk about skills you can use with your team to make this happen.
We also recognize that sometimes when a coach exercises a stronger stance we can push our teams a bit too hard and create negative conflict. It's times like this when we need to demonstrate how to reach out and make the first move to repair the relationship. In this session, we will introduce the concept of repair bids to help you regroup in the event this ever happens to you.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify two coaching anti-patterns
  • Embrace the concept of more powerfully challenging teams to make them better
  • Utilize repair techniques to get coaching back on track when you push the team a bit too hard


Speakers
avatar for Allison Pollard

Allison Pollard

Agile Coach, Improving
Allison Pollard helps people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, Allison enjoys mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering... Read More →
avatar for Cherie Silas

Cherie Silas

Enterprise Agile Coach, Tandem Coaching Academy
Certified Enterprise Coach and ICF Professional Certified Coach


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
San Diego C

15:45

From Mindset to Consciousness: Playing the Infinite Game of Human Development (Jean Richardson)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Agile is part of an evolution in consciousness--in the nature of our awareness and noticing skills and our knowledge of self and other. When agile emerges in an organization, it does so within a consciousness unlike its own. Yet, our approaches to agility often impede its ability to stick where it emerges.
Agilists have used the frames of mindset and learning. But, we need to use the frames of consciousness and development in order to truly transform. In doing so, we see agile transformations are actually personal transformations. Organizations don't change, people change and then the organization adapts.
This deep dive session discusses the agile mindset and puts “mindset” in the context of “consciousness.” It speaks to advancing agilists who are trying to understand why adoptions go wrong when they have done everything "right." You are more likely to receive full value in this session if you have have been pursuing agility within organisations for at least three years.
This session provides pointers on how to spot developmental as opposed to lower level learning experiences. It is based on my own practice, on research I did for my master’s thesis, and on my book The Preservation of the Agile Heart: From Mindset to Consciousness.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Be able to articulate a working definition of consciousness
  • Understand the difference between mindset and consciousness
  • Understand how consciousness and human development align
  • Understand the difference between learning and development
  • Be able to spot learning opportunities that do not facilitate development
  • Be able to create opportunities for personal development and self-care in the context of development

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina E

15:45

MVR - Minimally Viable Relationships (Jenny Tarwater, Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
We've all had connections that are very easy to establish and maintain. For example, at a conference or meet up we easily find others that we have things in common with and form a minimum viable relationship quickly. But on teams, when relationships actually need to be formed quickly, it seems to be a lot harder to do so. Why is trust so fickle and why can't teams come together and achieve high performance earlier?
Natalie and Jenny will discuss the characteristics of a minimum viable relationship where trust and connection are formed quickly. They will align ideas of bias, psychological safety, and how they relate to the Tuckman model (stages of group development) and other group dynamic and cohesion theories. Participants will experience activities of how to replicate early success and trust-based performance on new and long-formed teams. The minimum viable relationship will bring teams closer together and help them to see each other as equals on the path to team conversion and success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Increase team trust by truly learning about ourselves and how to better connect with others more quickly
  • Understand how groups form and deterrents to their successful formation
  • Discover why you may be a hindrance to an MVR and learn strategies to course correct


Speakers
avatar for Jenny Tarwater

Jenny Tarwater

Agile Coach and Trainer, Blueshift Innovation
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Sr Agile Consultant, Natalie Warnert LLC
Natalie Warnert is the primary founder of the Women in Agile initiative, which enables, empowers, and expands the distribution of new and diverse ideas in the agile and technology communities worldwide. She is a frequent speaker on business and agile topics including product strategy... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
San Diego A

15:45

User Stories Suck! (David Hawks)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The User Story concept was invented almost 20 years ago and it’s time for an update. This is an outdated process that supports an old way of working focused on predictable requirements delivery.
Wouldn’t you like to know much earlier which features are not going to be valued by your market? We need techniques that shorten the feedback loop with customers not stakeholders. We need to prioritize based on riskiest assumptions and iterate quickly through small experiments in order to (in)validate our ideas as fast as possible. This session exposes a new set of practices which support product discovery.
In this session, you will work hands on with new templates that define the work the team needs to execute while starting with the business objective and helping you identify your riskiest assumptions. You will learn some best practices for writing hypothesis and how to turn those into Minimal Viable Experiments.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the difference between Discovery and Delivery
  • How to Write Objectives, Hypotheses and Experiments
  • Learn new techniques for prioritizing work based on riskiest assumptions


Speakers
avatar for David Hawks

David Hawks

Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Velocity
David Hawks is a Certified Enterprise Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer who has played almost every role in product development: developer, architect, Scrum Master, manager, Product Owner, and executive. He has a background in building highly productive Agile teams and a passion for... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

15:45

Experiment Gone Right! (TDD Mobbing Workshop) (Ross Libby, Travis Klinker)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Imagine the ideal solution - sleek, intuitive, maintainable. Imagine the model team - cross-functional, customer focused, value driven. Now add a dose of reality. Deadlines are looming, shared understanding is deprioritized, distractions are rampant, corners are cut, maximize output (not outcomes) is emphasized. How are you suppose to continuously improve towards either of those visions, let alone both? In short, it's a journey, and you need to figure out a way to take that first step.
The Target Dojo (immersive learning environment) has harnessed the power of test-driven development (TDD) and mob programming (mobbing) into a journey jump-starting workshop. The workshop promotes the mindset behind the practices, prioritizes practical application using a team's work vs. static examples/exercises, and reinforces frequent, quality deliverables and stable, high-performing teams as the backbone to a healthy product.
This session will cover the following:
• How we engage and obtain buy-in from the entire team (developers, product owners, scrum masters, and leaders) to try TDD and mobbing
• An overview of the experimentation we did with the workshop and its format (over a year of inspecting, iterating, and improving)
• Details and approach of the workshop (consultation meeting, prep activities, metrics, agenda, facilitation techniques, etc.)
• The ongoing grassroots (e.g. Product Management Community of Practice) and leader (e.g. Leader Chats) mechanisms to generate continued interest and support

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the mindset behind and tactics of Test Driven Development (TDD) and Mob Programming (mobbing)
  • Understand why TDD and mobbing work so well together (especially when first getting started)
  • Experience ways to engage the whole team in TDD and mobbing
  • Hear about the benefits of TDD and mobbing
  • See the format, approach, and outcomes of the Dojo workshop

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Travis Klinker

Travis Klinker

Director, Agile & Engineering Enablement, Target
Travis is a Director, Agile & Engineering Enablement at Target whose team of coaches is leading an organizational transformation with a focus on Product, customer-centric value, Lean-Agile adoption, and DevOps.
avatar for Ross Libby

Ross Libby

Agile Coach, Target Corporation
Accomplished business analyst, consultant, coach, and agile team leader passionate about building and being part of teams that experiment and learn rapidly to deliver value continuously – 10 years of corporate retail experience driving business outcomes, orchestrating cross-functional... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

15:45

Two-Pizza Team Heartburn Relief: Solutions to Team Dependencies (Mike Griffiths)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Small teams are great - until they cause bigger problems than they solve. Small teams can communicate more effectively than large teams. They can leverage face-to-face communications more readily and share tacit knowledge without the need for so much written communication. However, for large endeavours, using many small teams present their own problems. Work dependencies between teams can cause major delays through costly hand-offs, mismatched priorities, and blocked tasks.
This workshop introduces strategies for structuring teams to reduce hand-offs and dependencies that create blocked work and delays. By investigating the (lack of) flow through multiple teams we can diagnose the cost of hand-offs and culprits of delays. We examine tools for making hand-offs and dependencies visible to highlight and bring collective attention to the problems. We then explore resolution patterns and work structures that maximize small team communications but limit negative aspects of managing multiple, inter-dependent project teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the time and cost penalties of team dependencies and hand-offs
  • Gain tools for making dependencies, queues, and blocked work visible
  • Learn how and when to balance small team benefits with more dependency issues
  • Share implementation patterns and strategies to maximize team throughput

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 9

15:45

Calendars for Humans - How to undo the all-day cram (Dominica DeGrandis)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Are you losing precious time trapped in meeting misery? Are two meetings scheduled on top of each other - during lunch – a common occurrence? Heavy meeting cultures endure this collision of priorities frequently. Dashing from meeting to meeting allows sparse time for people to finish important work and contributes to low employee satisfaction ratings and poor performance. Getting buy-in to change meeting madness is tricky – but it can be done!
In this session, Dominica addresses the too-many-meetings issue and provides actionable takeaways to help you optimize your time. Since metrics are useful for influencing decision makers, an interactive metrics exercise which reveals problems from overbooked workers is included in the session. Additionally, calendar configurations are presented to demonstrate how you can optimize your calendar. Come learn how to influence the boss and get buy-in to improve your team’s capacity to get real work done.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Implement time-saving interruption busters
  • Address meeting culture in your organization (somebody is going to influence the boss - it might as well be you!)
  • Construct and interpret a balanced set of metrics that reveal wasted time
  • Optimize your calendar to enable time for your most important work

Attachments:


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marina G

15:45

Lowering the Water Line of Your Culture Iceberg with MVV (Melissa Boggs)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Use Mission, Vision, and Values to build a healthy agile culture you can lean into when the tide rolls.
There is frequent discussion about how a healthy agile culture is imperative to the agile transformation, but how do we develop or grow that culture with intention? This talk discusses how the development of a Mission, Vision, and Values statement can become the foundation for a healthy agile culture, and a lifesaver when the going gets tough. Using real world examples from software and the classroom, I will discuss how Mission, Vision, and Values are the first step toward creating organizational alignment that is necessary to enable agility and the self-organization of teams. I will also talk about how we can lean into that culture (instead of our old habits!) when teams are struggling, deadlines are looming, or we feel like we are sinking in the face of criticism or doubt.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What, why, and how of developing Mission Vision Values
  • Why MVV is imperative for organizational agility
  • How MVV enables self organization of teams
  • How MVV acts as a lifeguard when the tide rolls
  • Examples of MVV in action - software and classroom

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Boggs

Melissa Boggs

Enterprise Agile Coach, agile42
With a passion for agile culture and leadership, Melissa Boggs is an Agile Coach who uses facilitation techniques, lessons from improv, and deep listening to "lower the water line" of the culture iceberg. Together, she and clients uncover new paths, strengths, and the power of their... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 8

15:45

Aesthetic Criticism for Software Teams (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Software, like art, can be subjective and our appreciation of it influenced by our own personal views and tastes. The fine arts have long cultivated a processes for students and teachers to process feedback on both the objective and subjective aspects of works in a clear, helpful and kind way. This process, known as “Critiquing” aims to give the artist meaningful feedback on how others see their art so they may grow and improve. In this workshop we will teach software development teams the formal process of critiquing and how to apply it to demos or even code reviews.

Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of the workshop students should know the different parts of a formal art critique. They should be able to give a meaningful critique to someone and should also understand how to receive criticism and know what their options are for responding to it.


Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Lead Product Engineer, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include architecture, security, application usability, CI... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 5

15:45

Epic Budgeting - or how agile teams meet deadlines (Dave Sharrock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Epic budgeting is all about meeting deadlines. Working with agile teams that pull work while meeting stakeholder expectations around what gets done by what date. The challenge is that teams don't always pull as much as we want them too. So how do you hit a deadline without forcing work onto the team?
According to this year's State of Agile survey, the most common success measure for agile initiatives, at 53%, is on-time delivery. But if agile teams can choose how much work they take into a sprint, how can teams be sure of delivering pre-committed scope on time and on budget? There is clearly more to agile delivery than product owners ordering a backlog of work for teams to work on.
Epic Budgeting allows the product owner to steer a product across the line, delivering the expected scope on time by managing scope creep or an unsustainable focus on the perfect over the pragmatic. During this session learn how product owners and their teams work towards a fixed date or budget by applying double loop learning to epic sizing and breakdown. Expect some tales from real companies and a few light hearted moments. And I'm at least 53% certain we will finish on time!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to confidently create a long-term product delivery roadmap, including an estimate of delivery date
  • Discover the importance of proactively managing the breakdown and estimation of stories
  • See how to use the breakdown of epics into stories as a means to manage scope creep and steer a product to a given deadline
  • Learn how to meet deadlines with an agile team that is uncertain about what they can deliver

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dave Sharrock

Dave Sharrock

Agile Coach, agile42
Dad, internet veteran, husband, entrepreneur, occasional seismologist. British and almost Canadian. Agile coach and change agent. Only Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) and Certified Agile Leader (CAL) in Canada.


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 6

15:45

Ask Me Almost Anything - Linda Rising (Linda Rising)

Abstract:
I love the Stalwarts sessions because it's as much about the participants as the "presenters." I love to share the latest bit of cool information with my attendees, so here goes.
Some recent research by Tom Gilovich and Shai Davidai, both working in psychology at Cornell University, has shown how we react to the events in our lives. How we treat the things that have helped us (tailwinds) and the things that have hindered us (headwinds) and what the result of this reaction is in our lives. They recently published a paper called “The Headwinds/ Tailwinds Asymmetry” with lots of information about their research. Those of us who are bike riders or runners know what it's like to ride or run into the wind. We struggle. We work harder. We sometimes curse Mother Nature. Then when the wind is at our backs, we are, at least for the moment, happier and ride or run faster. We feel stronger and rejoice. We have all felt these forces whether we bike or run because life hands us these two kinds of challenges and boosts all the time. The research is interesting because it shows that we tend to believe that others don't have to work as hard as we do. We even believe this about our own siblings--Mother always liked you best--Father gave you more privileges, while I got more punishment. And, then, the real surprise, from this research. When we believe that life has given us more than our fair share of headwinds, we adjust our view of right and wrong to try to make up for it. That's right--our ethics can be determined by our distorted view of what life has handed us. It's a little scary but, as I have said, it's fascinating. That's us in a nutshell--scary, but fascinating.
I'd like to encourage the participants in this session to look at the challenges with a sense of gratitude. Yes, this is old advice, but then I'm going to be 76 soon :-)! All the research that touches on this topic suggests that we do better in so many ways when we "count our blessings." We'll practice and, hopefully, have everyone leave smiling instead of whining :-)! OK, that's probably too much.
I've spent over 20 years learning about agile practices, and I'm not done yet. Please come help me get even better. Thanks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Queen of Patterns, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant based in Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

15:45

Continuous Delivery Requires Radical Change for Testers (Jeffrey Morgan)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does testing and quality look like in a Continuous Delivery world? Who does what and how? Is there still a need for testers or do developers do all of the testing? Is it really possible to achieve quality when you deploy to production many times each day? What should testers do when there is no time for a “testing phase”? These are some of the questions many in the testing community ask as the software development industry moves toward this new paradigm of design and delivery.
Continuous Delivery is a radical change in the way we build and deliver software and it requires a radical shift in the way we thing about and achieve quality. Join this veteran Agile coach as he shares his experience. In this presentation you will learn what has worked for several large organizations that have made the transition to this new approach. Jeff "Cheezy" Morgan will present both a picture of the end game and a roadmap of how one can incrementally move forward while developing the new skills necessary to succeed in this fast paced environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • By attending this talk you should expect to have a better understanding of:
  • * what is meant when one talks about Continuous Delivery or CI/CD.
  • * how quality is achieved when code is deployed to production several times a day.
  • * how the role of a tester changes and what skills are necessary to succeed in a world of CD.
  • * how to build a roadmap to incrementally change the testing process to work with CD

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Balboa/Mission Hills

15:45

Random Play: Using Randomness & Play to Spark Creativity & Fuel Innovation (Emerson Taymor)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Design Thinking and Lean are both great methodologies, but some of their techniques can limit the ability to create break-through ideas. By leveraging randomness, play and sketching we can generate a more diverse set of ideas, which ultimately lead to better outcomes.
During new product ideation it is helpful to do rapid sketching to get a breadth of divergent ideas from your team. However, we find that during these sessions it is natural to be boxed in to your existing ways of thinking or to jot down the first idea that comes to the top of your head.
This workshop introduces a new wrinkle on classic ideation methods like crazy eights (each person sketches one idea per minute for eight minutes) to help increase the diversity and creativity of ideas. Using randomness we are able to help individuals stretch their brains orthoganally, bringing in new perspectives layered on top of their existing biases and knowledges. And by using an optional board game, we create further opportunities for play and creative thinking.
You will leave this workshop with tactics that you can apply tomorrow to generate not only a greater quantity of ideas, but also a greater quality with increased variance. And as a bonus, learn how to break challenging converging sessions with randomness and play as well.

Sample Agenda
10 min - Intro to Design Thinking, particularly divergent thinking with crazy eights and pitfalls
5 min - why play, randomness & sketching are important
5 min - Robot Drawing Icebreaker (sketching for non sketchers)
30 min - Each individual at each table does a unique crazy eights exercise that brings in randomness and play using a board game (as directed by the moderator). Individuals share their work
10 min - Random prioritization method from the game is selected and tables converge on a “winning” design
15 min - Teams present & wrap up

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the basics of design thinking
  • Understand the challenges with divergent techniques
  • Learn how to get non-designers loosened up for sketching exercises
  • Learn how to use randomness and speed to improve divergent thinking
  • Learn how play can improve creativity

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Emerson Taymor

Emerson Taymor

Founding Partner, Philosophie


Tuesday August 7, 2018 15:45 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

16:30

codeX Story: Challenging the Metrics that Limit Diversity in the Software Industry (Cara Turner)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
codeX is an agile-first vocational coding programme in South Africa, with a mission to increase the talent pool that the software industry can draw from.
We focus on reaching groups who are under-represented in tech, provide them with a solid agile web developer skill set, then connect them with jobs where they can flourish. Diversity is what we live and breathe.
Now in our fourth year of operations, we have shaped our programme year-on- year, based on the needs and insights of all our customers (applicants, mentors, coaches and employers).
Covering stories of our graduates' and employers' experiences, this talk looks at what we have learnt about hiring and diversity, fundamental indicators of developer talent, and how we have worked with organizations to create environments that support team members from different socio-economic backgrounds.
Beyond gender and ethnicity filters, one of the greatest barriers to diversity lies in the infrastructure and environment differences between affluent communities and those in poverty, and the hidden biases of recruitment processes and performance measurements.
In this session I'm introducing the indicators we developed for accepting applicants that go well beyond academic filtering, and how we are helping companies review the profiling-type filters that their HR departments got stuck with, to find homes for developers who bring both agile thinking and diversity of perspective to their teams.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Agile first: blending education and discovery practices
  • Metrics that block diversity
  • - How recruiting and on-boarding practices work to keep diversity out
  • Measuring to create success
  • Changes we made in the on-boarding process
  • - New models we developed for internships


Speakers
avatar for Cara Turner

Cara Turner

CEO & Agile Coach, codeX
Cara is the CEO and Agile Coach at Project codeX, an agile-first software training programme that equips aspiring coders with high quality skills and experience, while bridging the digital divide. | Having spent years helping teams adopt agile practices that reduce risk and increase... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 16:30 - 17:00
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

16:30

Certified or certifiable - a question of trust (Seb Rose)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Certification schemes vary massively. Professionals and organisations have a hard time deciding whether they are trustworthy indications of quality or a futile box-ticking exercise.
A certificate can be an indication that the bearer has sat in a training room for a day or compelling evidence that they have deep knowledge and broad experience. It seems obvious that the former are not as valuable as the latter, but you wouldn’t guess this by reading through a pile of job specifications. The requirement to hold a certificate, if mentioned at all, is often for certificates at the cheaper, easier, less meaningful end of the spectrum.
This session follows my struggle with the certification process as I sought to create one for my own company. We’ll look at the various sorts of agile certification available and explore the reactions they have elicited from practitioners and employers. From this we’ll build an understanding of the various goals and challenges that any certification scheme will face. And you’ll see how I reached a compromise that will hopefully work for my company, our customers, and our associates.
You’ll leave with enough information to allow you to make a value judgement about some of the well-known Agile certification schemes that exist, how to determine whether you should trust them, and what their existence bodes for the future of the Agile eco-system.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the tensions inherent in all certification schemes, enabling you to ask the right questions to decide whether any given scheme is valuable for you
  • Tell anecdotes harvested from your peers, that give insight into how certification schemes can succeed or fail
  • Explain how the emergence and development of certification schemes corresponds to the adoption and maturity of Agile approaches

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. He first worked as a programmer in 1980 writing... Read More →


Tuesday August 7, 2018 16:30 - 17:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

17:30

Agile Tonight! (Paul Hammond)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Ready to talk about the big issues in Agile? Each year at the Agile20XX conference, our Agile Tonight! session brings attendees together to learn about and discuss important questions, issues, and trends which impact and influence our industry.
At Agile2018, Agile Tonight! is a facilitated session that will initiate a positive conversation about diversity and inclusion. We we will collectively raise awareness of the issues which can lead to feelings of being physically, mentally, or emotionally unsafe or of being excluded — at our conferences, at our workplaces, in our industry, and in our lives. We will create an inclusive environment in the room and share approaches and stories that will give everyone more confidence to help create safer environments in their daily work and lives.

Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Tuesday August 7, 2018 17:30 - 19:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2
 
Wednesday, August 8
 

07:30

Registration Open

Abstract:
Pick-up your badge and conference materials and ask any questions you may have at Agile2018 throughout the week.

Wednesday August 8, 2018 07:30 - 17:30
Marriott Grand Foyer

08:00

Breakfast

Breakfast

Wednesday August 8, 2018 08:00 - 09:00
Pacific Ballroom

08:00

Bookstore Open

Abstract:
Come check out the latest literature on agile practices.

Wednesday August 8, 2018 08:00 - 18:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:00

What is the story with Agile data? (Troy Magennis)

Abstract:
We are surrounded by data, but we often struggle to see and use it. It’s not good enough just to show the data in a chart. People need to see and understand the importance of the data they are being shown, and then know how to act. Stories help people make that connection. This keynote is about helping people tell important stories in Agile using data. Stories that help something known by a few known to the everyone in such a compelling way that the right action is taken.

Learning Outcomes:
  • .

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
Marriott Grand Ballroom

09:00

Agile Alliance Initiatives

Abstract:
Initiatives are ideas and concepts that develop into plans for action. They are proposed by Agile Alliance members or the Agile Alliance board of directors. Initiatives help the Alliance deliver on its mission to support people who explore and apply Agile values, principles, and practices to make building software solutions more effective, humane, and sustainable.” There is an Initiative Shepherd available to assist individuals with concept development.

Stop by the Agile Alliance Lounge to see all our initiatives, get involved, or propose one of your own!

Wednesday August 8, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

09:00

Agile Alliance Lounge Open

Abstract:
Take a break from Agile2018 action and relax in the Agile Alliance Lounge! As an attendee, you are a member — we invite you to check out information about Alliance initiatives and activities, meet the board members and staff, and visit the Agile Advice and Business Agility areas. While you’re there, don’t forget to enjoy a refreshing beverage, pick up some swag, and discover how you and your company can become more involved in the Agile community.

See you there!

Wednesday August 8, 2018 09:00 - 17:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

10:15

Morning Break

Morning Break

Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:15 - 10:45
All Foyers

10:30

Business Agility Lab

Abstract:
Did you know that over half of Agile teams have issues with development and business people working together effectively? A core principle behind the Agile Manifesto is that they must do so daily throughout their project. Without adopting the Agile practice of daily collaboration, organizations struggle to deliver high customer value.

To address this, Agile Alliance will have a special area in the Agile Alliance Lounge: the Business Agility Lab. You’ll be able to participate in one of the widest retrospectives regarding understanding key positive and negative themes with Agile and business — the Narrative Project. You can add your voice by submitting a story or helping design experiments to amplify Agile principles inside your company.

Business leaders who understand the benefits of Agile will also be on hand to offer tips about improving your company’s Agile adoption process. Ray Arell (former Sr. Director at Intel), Heidi Musser (former VP & CIO at USAA), Hendrik Esser (VP at Ericson), and Steve Denning (former Director at World Bank) look forward to helping you!

The Business Agility Lab will be open Monday-Thursday from 10:30-16:30, with activities announced daily. We look forward to your participation!

Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:30 - 12:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

10:45

Share the Load: Distributing Design Authority with Lightweight Decision Records (Michael Keeling, Joe Runde)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Documenting architecture design decisions is commonly considered a good practice but few teams take the time to write down the decisions they make. In our experience this happens for a few reasons: architecture documentation is rejected as being too heavyweight, documentation is typically out of sight and out of mind, and many developers don’t know what to document. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs), a lightweight documentation approach proposed by Michael Nygard, solves these problems by recording design decisions in a simple markdown template in the same repository as the code affected by the decision. We've found that this technique has many advantages. Documenting ADRs creates opportunities to involve more teammates in the design process. Up and coming architects can safely practice design under the guidance and review of experienced teammates. Over time ADRs form a catalog of proto-patterns that can be bootstrap future architectures.
In this talk we will share our experiences and lessons using ADRs over the past two years while working on the IBM Watson Discovery Service. By the end of this talk you will know how to create effective ADRs, introduce the technique to your team, and avoid common pitfalls with the method.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How to phrase a decision as a lightweight decision record and share it with others
  • How to think through decisions and how to guide others in doing so
  • ADRs help us write better code
  • ADRs help us understand what risks we are accepting and we are able to think more strategically about risk
  • Other documentation is still required and ADRs are a good way to figure out what else needs to be documented. ADRs are a part of a minimalist set of design documentation
  • We can learn from past decisions in other parts of the system and extract team and institutional patterns

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joe Runde

Joe Runde

IBM
Joe Runde is a software engineer who recently started his career at IBM. There he works on Watson while teaching about machine learning methods and learning about software design from many smarter folks. Joe has an MS in Machine Learning from Carnegie Mellon University and a BS in... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 11:15
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

10:45

People Operations in a Teal Organization - Tools and Techniques from our Journey (Bob Payne, Amanda Geary)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
When I first saw Frederic Laloux's "Reinventing Organizations" I immediately said "Hell Yes .... We are doing this .... I will never work any other way!".
On our journey to teal we have undergone many transitions and experiments. Amandas story is a great illustration of the power of opening up the organization, she has transitioned to a few hours a week software tester to the VP of people operations and finance. Amanda and I have been working on our Teal Transformation at LitheSpeed. We want to share some of our challenges moving towards a deeper teal culture and our goal of developing tools for creating a system of organizational Development and self management.
We will share our real world experience using:
  • Colleague Letter of Understanding (CLOU) within LitheSpeed on this journey.
  • Distributed decision making and organizational structure
  • Self management for the whole organization
  • People Operations, peer to peer feedback/engagement/performance reviews
  • Financial transparency, open salaries, managing the business
  • Giving voice to the organization
We will share this story using the World Cafe workshop format. For more information on the world cafe method you can check it out here (http://www.theworldcafe.com/key-concepts-resources/world-cafe-method/).
This interactive workshop will allow participants to learn from our lessons and collaborate to create strategies to transform their organizations or organizations they work with. Participants will be given an overview of each topic, what worked, what challenges we faced and then will be able to break out into topic areas of their choosing
A lot of things have been said about Frederic Laloux's Teal organizational models, but not many organizations have actually taken the transformational plunge. Why listen to someone who has just read the book when you can listen to our No BS account of our journey. This means we will tell you what worked and what did not work, warts and all. Real life is messy that way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of People Operations
  • Basic Review of Teal Organizational Models
  • Specific Tactics we Used and What Went Well.


Speakers
avatar for Amanda Geary

Amanda Geary

Finance and People Operations, LitheSpeed
I started my career as a research analyst at 4th Wave, a technology consulting firm specializing in research on trends in the IT and communication industry. I then moved on to Freddie Mac and worked with development & testing to analyze market needs and implement product offerings... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina F

10:45

Development and Test Metrics 101 (Catherine Swetel, Julia Wester)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
This session will outline the most common metrics used for understanding flow and impediments in software development and test functions. By attending this session you will have a clear picture of the types of metrics that help understand Agile development, and how to get started in capturing and using these for improving Agile adoption, improvement, and management.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To define the types of metrics used in Agile development and testing
  • To show how these metrics are measured and interpreted
  • To give the top three ways to begin capturing and using these metrics

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Julia Wester

Julia Wester

Co-founder, Principal Consultant, Logom Solutions
Julia is the co-founder of Lagom Solutions, a Lean/Agile consulting and training company that pulls from her 17 years of experience working in and managing teams at Turner Broadcasting, F5 Networks and LeanKit. Julia is passionate about teaching others how to tame the chaos of everyday... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

10:45

The Act of Transforming (Barry Forrest)

Abstract:
What does transformation mean for an organization of people?
Organizations treat an agile transformation as a singular event. It is a budgetary line item, a noun, a one-time metamorphosis from caterpillar to butterfly. Expert agilists who have “been there, done that” are sought to guide the transformation.
While one gains credibility by having “been there, done that,” what impact does that have on our vision? How does this distort our ability to be empathetic? To meet the organization where they are?
As agilists, how are we affected by our relationships with these transforming organizations? What would it mean for us to be transforming alongside others in the organization? What happens if we are steadfast and unchanging as a witness to others’ transforming?
As the experts, we lean on "proven methods" and "best practices". How do those color our view and demand that people transform in a particular way? What might happen within the organization if we more actively transform ourselves? What would it mean to transform the way we assist organizational transformations?
We'd like to explore transforming as a verb. Join us as we zoom in on who and what is transforming through agile transformations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Presidio 1 & 2

10:45

Say It So They Hear You: Providing Meaningful Feedback (Jennifer Dyni)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Giving constructive feedback that truly resonates and helps others take action is one of the most challenging aspects of communication for any team member. What to say, when to say it, how to deliver it? Will they listen, how will they respond?
In this session, we will explore patterns and techniques for coaches, leaders and other people-minded team members that help build feedback loops with the individuals and teams they work with day to day. We will navigate models for framing, delivering, receiving and acting on feedback and have some fun along the way in this interactive workshop.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will be familiar with the coaching techniques of feedback design reviews, attunement, reflective language. They will have practiced using these techniques to help frame, deliver and act on individual and team feedback. Attendees will have tried those techniques during the workshop and have the information they need to use/apply them in order to more effectively coach teams and individuals in their organizations.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Dyni

Jennifer Dyni

Engineering Team Owner, Ultimate Software
Jennifer Dyni is passionate about anything and everything that helps teams and individuals foster and develop highly collaborative and creative work environments. Currently an Agile Coach and Engineering Team Owner with Ultimate Software, Jennifer's background includes over 18 years... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

10:45

The Positive Impact of a Great Agile First Impression (Zach Bonaker)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Have you found new team members take months getting up to speed with the rest of the team? Do you wonder about their engagement and happiness in a new place of work? Do newly hired people lack interest in the organization’s mission?
Many agile organizations struggle with these questions. Perhaps we’re still getting people off on the wrong foot with some details of our hiring and onboarding practices. These often overlooked, easily forgotten practices have a big impact on engagement and culture. Your hiring process can catalyze excitement for the company mission. Agile-appropriate onboarding quickly harmonizes the team and quickly returns them to productivity.
This talk for team members, managers, and change agents examines the positive impact hiring and onboarding practices can have on agile transformation. Using real world examples from successful agile companies, the session shares a mixture of new principles and practices audience members can experiment with. Additionally, the content is wrapped in systems thinking to increase knowledge for organizational change.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize how agile helps us transform hiring and onboarding.
  • Formulate hiring and/or onboarding practices that increase engagement.
  • Identify useful principles for getting new team members to a productive place quickly.
  • Explain practices which create inclusion, excitement, and satisfaction when bringing new people into an organization.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Zach Bonaker

Zach Bonaker

Benevolent Trouble-Maker, Teradata
Curious about anything agile, systems thinking, and human-friendly organizations.


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 5

10:45

The Real Value of Agile is Not in Delivery (Mathias Eifert, Paul Boos)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you - or worse, your bosses - starting to doubt this Agile thing? Are your software teams proficiently delivering every two weeks and yet it just doesn't seem to make much of a difference to the bottom line?
Most organizations begin their foray into Agile with software development and that makes sense - after all, the Agile Manifesto focuses on “working software.” Unfortunately, though, this is often also where the Agile journey comes to a grinding halt. Management confines Agile to a small box labeled “Delivery,” puts a lid on it, and everything else continues as usual. Development teams in such an environment may produce more software, faster and with better quality, but the expected impact on the organization often fails to materialize because the business value of the produced software doesn’t increase correspondingly.
In this workshop, we’ll take a closer look at why Agile shouldn’t end with “working software.” The most commonly used Agile frameworks don’t provide much guidance on how to manage risk and ensure the creation of organizational value, so we will draw on insights, tools and techniques from other domains to identify crucial, high risk assumptions, test our hypotheses, and measure outcomes. We’ll combine presentation and activities to explore how we can get past the “feature factory” focus and apply the Agile mindset beyond delivery to produce better business outcomes and organizational impact.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore how Lean Discovery and experimentation can expand the scope of Agile’s “inspect and adapt” learning loops beyond software delivery
  • Identify and examine the riskiest assumptions with tools like Assumption Mapping and Impact Mapping
  • Learn how to use the power of iteration and feedback to validate critical assumptions with testable hypotheses


Speakers
avatar for Paul Boos

Paul Boos

IT Executive Coach, Excella Consulting
Paul is an IT Executive Coach with Excella Consulting helping managers and teams improve their game. He focuses on pragmatic ways Agile, Lean, and leadership techniques can applied to make organizations more effective. Paul has led small teams to large groups as a development manager... Read More →
avatar for Mathias Eifert

Mathias Eifert

Lean/Agile Coach and Managing Consultant, Excella
I'm an Agile pragmatists with a strong interest in first principles over specific frameworks. I believe Agile is primarily a way to manage uncertainty and the biggest uncertainty is in figuring out the "right thing" to focus our efforts on, so much of my coaching is around goal-centered... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 6

10:45

Agile Architecture: Mindset, skills, and practices (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
There are many questions surrounding agile and architecture: How do agile teams address architecture? If the best architectures evolve over time, should you do any architecture modelling up front or just dive right in? How do you effectively evolve your architecture? Who is responsible for architecture on an agile team? How do we address common architecture issues across agile teams?
Luckily everyone one of these questions, and more, have been answered by other teams just like yours. There are many ways to answer each of these questions - there isn't a single "best practice" but instead several good options that you can choose from. In this workshop we will work together to explore the mindset, skills, and practices required to successfully evolve architecture on agile teams. Techniques such as initial architecture envisioning, architecture risk canvases, spikes, walking skeletons, model storming, agile guidance, and others will be shared. Collaboration strategies, including potential roles such as Architecture Owner, Enterprise Architect, and Reuse Engineer will also be overviewed.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how architecture fits into agile development
  • Explore architecture-oriented roles
  • Share potential strategies for evolutionary architecture

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Scott Ambler + Associates
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 12 & 13

10:45

How to build and use a pipeline factory to accelerate your DevOps journey (Peter Maddison)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
There are many approaches to your enabling and accelerating the DevOps transformation within your organization. In this talk, I'll walk through a key component piece of the approach I helped develop at a large fortune 500 bank in the past year: helping build and architect a pipeline factory to accelerate development teams adoption of DevOps tooling and practices.
I'll provide an overview of the abstracted model used to provide an understanding of the approach to the executives then dive into the framework, architecture and tooling selection and implementation. Through the course of the talk, I'll cover the roadblocks we encountered and the key methods used to overcome these. This ranges from helping the team building the factory to understand what was needed through to building out of the platform itself and execution of the surrounding operational model.
The intent is to provide attendees with insight into an approach to help large organizations overcome the challenges of DevOps adoption where the development teams are resistant to the necessary change.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees should walk away with:
  • - An understanding of how to help executives understand what is necessary to accelerate delivery
  • - The component pieces required to quickly build delivery pipelines that integrate into typical enterprise tools
  • - The capabilities you need to develop and suggestions for approaches to the right tools to use in the different areas
  • - How to use the creation of the factory as a powerful tool to transform your transformation team itself (if they've gone down that path)
  • - Common roadblocks (security, testing, identity, data management) and tips and tricks to overcome them

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Peter Maddison

Peter Maddison

CTO and co-founder, Xodiac Inc
Peter Maddison has been in the business of building high-performance teams and automating everything worth automating for the past couple of decades. | He has a lot of experience in helping organisations accelerate their delivery practices and is equally comfortable talking about... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Cardiff/Carlsbad

10:45

Agile Metrics - The GQM Approach (John Tanner)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
There is a need to collect data which demonstrates progress and measures improvement within an Agile Enterprise, but where does one even start? Common Agile metrics approaches do well at measuring team velocity and throughput, but can sometimes overlook the requirements of executive sponsors, product management, and other key stakeholders. This problem is often rooted in a lack of understanding about what business goals are driving decision-making throughout the organization and what questions we should be answering with the metrics we collect.
During this session, we will explore the Goal Question Metrics (GQM) approach and show its effectiveness in identifying the key information your enterprise needs to know at the Executive, Portfolio, Program, and Delivery tiers. We will discuss case studies where GQM was implemented at scale and the lessons learned along the way. We will also explore sample metric sets for each tier and explain the goals and questions that drove us to them. At the end of this talk, the audience will understand not only how to ask the right questions for their context within the Enterprise, but specifically what metrics can be used to answer them.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Know the history and evolution of GQM
  • Describe the six key steps that comprise the GQM approach
  • Explain how GQM differs from traditional “roll-up” or “roll-down” Enterprise Agile metrics approaches
  • Understand the application of GQM at different tiers and in multiple contexts within the Enterprise
  • Able to analyze an organization’s team, technical, and financial health using GQM
  • Comprehend why and how to use feedback loops to continuously improve the goals, questions, and metrics defined for an Enterprise

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Tanner

John Tanner

Senior Vice President, LeadingAgile
John Tanner is an experienced consultant and change agent with over 20 years of software industry experience. He has spent most of his career focused on building high-performing teams and creating better value delivery processes within organizations across Federal, commercial, and... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina D

10:45

Big Bang and Agile: Is it possible to have anything in common between them? (Andre Nascimento, Andre Andreazzi)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Thinking seriously, as an agillist would you consider helping a whole organization or area at once? Would you pilot with 100 people at first hand? And how about to move almost 1.000 people, in 8 floors within a month? Yes, sounds kind of chaotic, but sometimes **it’s the best way of doing it!
As agilists and lovers of inspecting and adapt mindset, it’s in our DNA that we must start small and grow organically. And it’s actually the way we have seen organizations done (doing) it. But what if small means 70+ teams with basic key discipline and practices that bases the culture and help them flourish? What if it could work? What are the pre-reqs for it?
Well, with a direct request from a CEO and the board we were challenged to have a whole building adopt Agile as the new way of work. Limited time, limited team and a fair amount of resistance, none of the Agile@Scale approaches we considered were enough to be sure it could work. *Actually, it almost did not work… *
In this talk, we'll bring a complete case study (in Latin America within Telecom Industry) that we could live this challenge/experience over the year (2017). We will share how we aligned the client leadership across all levels, from c-level executives to the agile teams, creating a single view around core values and principles which allowed the teams to thrive and to create value.
The program was based on the following work streams and core areas:
1. Organizational re-design based on value streams and end-to-end structures
2. Pilot of 6 months within 9 agile teams across 3 communities/tribes
3. Logistic and infrastructure program assuring all the physical changes, including moving almost 1.000 people in 8 floors
4. Change management involving HR and operations as well as mentoring and coaching from the c-levels to the teams
5. Training and capability building with focus on the leadership and middle management
6. Re-design the organizational strategic planning, implementing a QBR (Quarter Business Review) and OKR approach
7. Created a concept called "Agile Nest", 2 entire floors built as an incubator, to improve the agile team's maturity based on waves
More about the numbers involving this case:
  • 72 new end-to-end teams from 3 core business units
  • 7 value stream-oriented communities/tribes putting business and IT working together
  • 20+ chapters / CoEs
  • Several teams with no developer on it, based completely on business operations areas
  • ... all of them set up in a month, based on a few core values and principles and then started their own journey on being agile
Although we were very skeptical about if it could work, we were decided to take the risk. And after a number of failures (or learnings), we could see it working and creating value.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To learn and think in different perspectives when approaching an enterprise digital adoption or agile “transformation”
  • To have a different views of what should work and what shouldn't when it comes to adoptions at scale
  • Thinking on different ways to shape the culture around teams
  • Agile is a means, not an end. Keep the values and principles, adapt the practices
  • In what areas or value streams agile will not help you in the beginning?
  • What are the role of the leadership in a transformation such this?
  • How to align an entire organisation through purpose and goals?


Speakers
avatar for Andre Andreazzi

Andre Andreazzi

Agile Ent. Coach, McKinsey Digital Labs


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 9

10:45

The Agile Startup Is Much More Than a Lean Startup (Jurgen Appelo)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
We all know what The Lean Startup is about: Build-Measure-Learn, persevering or pivoting, and validated learning to get to product/market fit with a Minimal Viable Product. But for all its goodness, the method says nothing about pitching, funding, hiring, finance, or working as a team.
As the Founder/CEO and leader of a startup, I have raised more than 1M euros in what (I believe) was a very agile round of pitching and funding. I have a team of 12 people that I hired in a way that everyone considered fun, engaging, and agile. As a fully remote (non-collocated) team, we had to come up with some alternatives to standard agile practices that (we think) are still agile. And our agility stretches as far as our finances, our business model, and our board members.
The Lean Startup is a must-read for every entrepreneur and leader. But it covers only a small portion of a startup's responsibilities. What you really need to do as a founder and manager of a startup is to learn how to run an Agile Startup.

Learning Outcomes:
  • the Value Compass, ChIRP metrics, pivoting and patching
  • how to do funding the agile way
  • how to do hiring the agile way
  • how to do remote working the agile way
  • how to do finance the agile way

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jurgen Appelo

Jurgen Appelo

CEO, Agility Scales
With my company Agility Scales, I am inventing the future of organizational agility. Why are we wasting our time learning how to manage companies, when very soon computers will navigate us through our work-lives and help us to lead and manage our teams? | | As a serial founder, successful... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego A

10:45

And this one time at Agile Camp... (Jason Hall, Chris Murman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
"Going to Agile 2018 and missing this session is like staying up all night writing a 40-page term paper and forgetting to hit Save" - You
With the success of regional agile conferences, more and more attendees show up with the desire to learn new Agile practices. Unfortunately, our brains are wired to forget most of the stuff we pick up at those conferences. Within one week most of us will forget 90% of what we learned at Agile2018. But using Brain Science, this workshop counteracts that effect by contextualizing “cool things” you picked up with real-world situations, putting the learner into the teacher role, and establishing follow up partnerships to reinforce learnings.
The common question many have after a day or two of sessions is what to do with all of these learnings. While some presentations have key takeaways worth implementing on their own, many of the concepts could be used in conjunction with others. The brainstorming principle of combining and refining might apply to the sessions we attend.
Participants will:
  • Crowdsource techniques and skills they remember from the week (don’t worry about if you don’t remember it exactly).
  • Create a Problem Canvas to experiment on.
  • Dry-run execution of technique and enhance it in a safe space.
  • Combine and Refine: Swap groups to try a different technique-> problem fit
  • Let's get real: Create a community using Slack to find out what really happens when people apply these.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Strengthen the muscle memory by dry running a technique you heard during the conference on a psuedo real-life problem.
  • - Learn more techniques and skills from talks that you missed.
  • - Discover the mesh points between concepts.
  • - Know when’s the right time to try something.
  • - Get constructive feedback on how to improve delivery of that technique via a Teach-Reinforce-Enhance framing structure
  • - After the Conference: Find out whether execution of those techniques worked as planned or didn’t


Speakers
avatar for Jason Hall

Jason Hall

Independent Coach, Collaborative Structures LLC
I'm a team and organizational servant with coaching strengths in creating safe spaces for teams to thrive, experiment, learn, and have fun. I've helped organizations develop a more customer-centric approach to product delivery grounded in measurable success. Always learning, always... Read More →
avatar for Chris Murman

Chris Murman

Senior Agile Consultant, Solutions IQ
Chris Murman's first job out of college was the weekend sports anchor at an NBC affiliate. If he had only known what was in store!Interestingly enough, he still loves telling the stories of others every day. Each interaction is an opportunity to learn what made you unique, and understand... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 8

10:45

Thinking Fast and Slow -- so what can we do about it? (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When I have asked audience members for the longest number of hours they have spent staring at screens, working on a problem, without getting up, the answers area always surprisingly large--the record is currently 16 hours! When asked about the length of time, the response is always, "But I solved the problem!" I then ask, "Suppose you could have done it in half the time? Or less? Let's learn what System 1 can do for us and hand work over to it by getting up and taking a break or moving to another task or even just doing nothing."
System 1 and System 2 are the unconscious and conscious parts of our brain. Nobel-prize winning author, Daniel Kahneman, says in his book "Thinking Fast and Slow" that we waste enormous amounts of energy using our limited System 2 resources to do everything. Kahneman and others have now done a lot of research that we should be applying. We make some decisions and solve some problems quickly and intuitively because System 1 is always at work. This can be beneficial except for the flawed approach System 1 often uses. It is influenced by a number of cognitive biases. These biases are hardwired--they meant survival at one time--but now they often hinder us. It would be good to know when to question the assumptions of System 1 and be able to make more rational decisions. Of course, if it's a flavor of ice cream or how many cans of soup to buy, let System 1 help you out, but if you're buying a house or getting married or contemplating a job change, or tracking down an elusive bug, involving System 2 can lead to better decisions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees can document six tips that can be immediately applied in all the thinking they do. I hope these tips will be so useful and so well-crafted that everyone will take them home and share them with their colleagues and family. I will likely bring index cards and encourage participants to "play along" and take notes for later reference. The talk will be evolving until the last minute. Right now the six tips are:
  • 1. Just don't do it
  • 2. Move stuff to System 1
  • 3. Take a break, gather data then leave it
  • 4. Slow down important decisions by allowing System 2 to take over, ask tough questions
  • 5. Have your own process to remember
  • 6. Write it down

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Queen of Patterns, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant based in Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina G

10:45

From Self Obsession to Self Selection: A Scaled Org's Journey to Value Reorganization (Wendy Jacobs, Tammy Gretz)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Self-organizing teams?

Does your organization suffer from too many "Number One Priorities" from different parts of the organization? Everyone believes their thing is the most important and it should be the #1 item. Shoulder taps "Can you just do this one thing real quick or can you slide it into your next sprint?". Which department takes priority? Who's work is more important? What is the true business value of the work the team is tasked with delivering?
If you've spent any time at all working with agile teams, you've heard that the teams should be self-organizing around the work. In theory, it sounds grand! "Ask the team...let the team decide", but in practice what does it mean? Does it mean they just get to pick the story cards for the sprint, or maybe the project they get to work on for the next ten sprints?
Or could it mean they can decide what to work on and who to work with all while delivering the most valuable items that the business actually wants?
What would it look like to let the teams actually decide? What are the unspoken rules of engagement for a self-selection activity? Come with us to see how one scaled organization, from a large enterprise, went on an 8-month journey of continuous improvement to move from teams organized by systems and processes to a group of teams self-selected and self-organized based on business value.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The Structure (How-To) of a Self-Selection event (and what not to do)
  • Emotional Human-side of Self-Selection / How to address for all types
  • Self-selection based on business value
  • Understanding the ramifications of scaling for teams that work on a portfolio of products
  • Commitment to the empirical process and continuous improvement and how to get buy-in at the enterprise level all the way to the team level.


Speakers
avatar for Tammy Gretz

Tammy Gretz

Scrum Master, Cardinal Solutions Group
Tammy has been influencing change through servant leadership, elbow grease, and hazelnut lattes for over 20 years. She is a massive maker and the majority of her education comes from the relentless pursuit of understanding team dynamics, experimentation and reflection. | | Tammy... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Jacobs

Wendy Jacobs

Agile Coach/Product Owner Coach, American Electric Power
Wendy is a Business Agility/Product Owner Coach with American Electric Power. Her passions are building cool products and mentoring and coaching on Product Management topics.


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
San Diego C

10:45

The Product Management Vacuum and the 3 V's (Don McGreal, Ralph Jocham)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In between the larger organizational goals and the day-to-day work of Development Teams, exists a vacuum. The thing about any vacuum is that it has an innate need to be filled. If we are not careful, this 'Product Management Vacuum' will get filled with meaningless busy work and extensive task management. Being busy without clear direction.
This session introduces the 3 V's -- Vision, Value, Validation -- as a way to get out in front of this problem.
All participants will leave with a Product/Program Management Dashboard to help bring visibility to the 3 V's and to keep the vacuum filled the right way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Awareness of the Product Management Vacuum
  • Use techniques for creating and communicating a product Vision
  • Capture metrics and practices that represent Value
  • Establish shorter feedback loops with stakeholders and the marketplace for product Validation
  • Use the Product Owner Dashboard


Speakers
avatar for Ralph Jocham

Ralph Jocham

Founder / CEO, effective agile.
Ralph Jocham is a German citizen who spent the last 20 years collecting professional software and product development experience in France, the UK, the USA, and now Switzerland. He became an Agile evangelist in 2000 and perfected his approach at ThoughtWorks. Ralph also is Europe’s... Read More →
avatar for Don McGreal

Don McGreal

VP, training, Improving
In his role as VP of Learning Solutions at Improving, Don McGreal is a hands-on agile consultant and instructor. And... | * Author of the book: 'The Professional Product Owner: Leveraging Scrum as a Competitive Advantage'. | * Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainer who has authored... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marina E

10:45

Ask Me Almost Anything - Ahmed Sidky (Ahmed Sidky)

Abstract:
After almost 10 years as an agile coach and enterprise consultant, going back into industry as the Head of Development Management at Riot Games was a tremendous learning experience, especially as I realized that not everything I aspired to introduce as an Agile consultant was possible, or even desirable, now that I was in charge. Humbling, indeed, but this has given me many fantastic opportunities to innovate, and evolve my understanding of agility.
In this Stalwarts session, I would love to discuss with the audience topics like: What does it mean to truly be customer-centric versus product-centric? How do you build a culture of learning using the agile mindset as an essential building block? What does it mean to be a servant leader without losing the “leader” aspect? What does it mean to have a culture of accountability in an agile environment?
Also as President of the International Consortium for Agile (ICAgile), other topics within my purview include agile training and education, organizational or individual learning paths, and how to advance the state of agile learning globally. As an advocate of the “agility of Agile,” I refuse to subscribe to a specific agile methodology, preferring instead to take the mindset, values, and principles of agile, and innovate practices helpful to a specific context. I believe in being Agile verses doing Agile.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - based on the questions asked


Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Head of Development Management, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Rancho Santa Fe 1, 2, & 3

10:45

UseTables to Drive out Ambiguity/Redundancy, Discover Scenarios, and Solve World Hunger (Ken Pugh)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Ambiguous or missing requirements cause waste, slipped schedules, and mistrust with an organization. Implementing a set of misunderstood requirements produces developer and customer frustration. Creating acceptance tests prior to implementation helps create a common understanding between business and development.
Acceptance tests start with communication between the members of the triad- business, developer, and tester. In this session, we specifically examine how to use tables as an effective means of communication. Employing tables as an analysis matrix helps a team discover missing scenarios. Redundant tests increase test load, so we show how performing an analogy of Karnaugh mapping on tables can help reduce redundant scenarios. We demonstrate that examining tables from various aspects, such as column headers, can reduce ambiguity and help form a domain specific language (DSL). A consistent DSL decreases frustration in discussing future requirements.
We briefly show how to turn the tables into tests for Fit and Gherkin syntax.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to elicit details of a requirement using tabular format
  • How to use tables to search for missing scenarios in acceptance tests
  • How to discover ambiguity and redundancy in acceptance tests
  • A way to logically connect tables to classes and modules
  • How to break complicated requirements represented by tables into smaller ones

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Pugh

Ken Pugh

Fellow, Ken Pugh, Inc.
Ken Pugh helps companies evolve into lean-agile organizations through training and coaching. His special interests are in collaborating on requirements, delivering business value, and using lean principles to deliver high quality quickly. Ken trains, mentors, and testifies on technology... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Balboa/Mission Hills

10:45

UX in Space: How NASA's JPL is Adopting a User-Centered Design Approach (Krys Blackwood)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is an 80 year old institution with a history of unprecedented success in robotic space exploration. From Voyager to Curiosity to Cassini, JPL missions continue to delight the public. However, as technology evolves and advances, and our spacecraft capabilities become more complex, the need to design our ground systems around both the user-operator and the everyday people who get our data becomes more important. In this talk, Krys Blackwood, Senior Lead User Experience Designer in the Human-Centered Design group at JPL will talk about the ways in which JPL is adapting time-tested procedures and rigorous processes to involve iterative, user-centered approaches from mission design all the way through launch and beyond.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn how NASA JPL is adopting user experience design
  • Attendees will learn techniques for cultural change
  • Attendees will learn techniques for infusing agile into a highly regulated, waterfall organization.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Krys Blackwood

Krys Blackwood

Senior Lead UX Designer, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Krys has been designing interfaces for 23 years. Most of her career was spent in the Silicon Valley, designing e-commerce experiences for companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500 corporations. She is both a researcher and a designer and specializes in helping companies adopt... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 10:45 - 12:00
Marriott Salon 10 & 11

11:00

Agile Advice

Abstract:
We all need advice from time to time, and having someone to bounce ideas off or share their thoughts can lead to great insights and uncover creative personalized solutions. At Agile2018, we are excited to provide Agile Advice as an offering tailored for you to bring your toughest questions, your biggest puzzles, and your worst hurdles.

Agile Advice is a 20 minute one-on-one conversation with an expert ready to offer their time and insight to those that are looking for a bit of advice. This diverse group of experts will be ready to chat about a wide range of agile topics such as culture, training, engineering, frameworks and leadership. Make sure to stop by and sign up for actionable advice on your Agile journey.

Wednesday August 8, 2018 11:00 - 15:00
Marriott Grand Foyer

11:30

Beyond Whack-a-Mole Coaching - Using Data Analysis to Find High ROI Coaching Opportunities (Marie Dingess, Doug Steele)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Determining where to focus Agile Coaching and Training in a large “already Agile” Tech organization can feel a bit like playing Whack-a-Mole. With hundreds of Agile practices and mindsets to potentially target and hundreds of teams at various levels of maturity and scale, how do you know which ones to target that will really make a difference? It’s easy to just focus on the areas that are least mature, rather than on the ones that might have the most impact.
In 2017, Capital One used a different approach with 2,600 employee survey responses in the areas of Intent, Planning, Flow, Team Health, Scaled Agile, Continuous Improvement, Leadership, and Engineering. We used statistical analysis to identify the impact of different Agile practices on two key areas: Team Health and Frequent Delivery of Business Value – revealing our Agile ROI!
In addition to sharing our analysis, we will tell the story of how we used these results in a multi-channel communications strategy to influence change agents towards improving practices with the largest impact rather than just improving the least mature ones.
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Through this experience, our Coaching team and organization learned:
  • • The benefits of using survey data to focus coaching efforts and influence leadership to support positive change, rather than relying on industry best practices alone
  • • The need to package statistical analysis approaches and results in ways that are easy to understand for non-specialists
  • • For our organization, there are specific Intent, Planning, and Scaled Agile practices which impact Frequent Delivery of Business Value
  • • For our organization, there are specific Leadership, Continuous Improvement, and Planning practices which impact Team Health
  • • Some provocative findings:
  • o Teams sizes larger than 5-9 were effective; only at 12+ did team effectiveness suffer
  • o Planning activities were highly correlated with Frequent Delivery of Business Value and Team Health, despite internal perceptions of the opposite

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marie Dingess

Marie Dingess

Agile Coach, Capital One


Wednesday August 8, 2018 11:30 - 12:00
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Wednesday August 8, 2018 12:00 - 14:00
Pacific Ballroom

12:00

Sponsor Exhibits

Abstract:
Sponsors are an important element of the Agile2018 Conference. Be sure to stop by and say Hi to all of our Sponsor Exhibitors in the Pacific Ballroom at Agile2018.

Wednesday August 8, 2018 12:00 - 15:45
Pacific Ballroom

14:00

Agile for All (Agile is Caught Not Taught) (Naveed Khawaja)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We strongly believe that 'Agile is for Everyone'. For an agile transformation to succeed at scale, non-IT departments play a vital role to bring about a sustainable change.
In this report, we will share how business teams at AstraZeneca are choosing to adapt the Agile ways of working across the globe.
Brief History: In 2016 we shared the initial success of adopting Agile with large IT programs, creating quick wins that responded some naysaying such as…
“We can’t run Agile. We have globally distributed teams”
“We can’t run Agile. We have to validate our systems.”
“We can’t run Agile because Agile is for application development. We deploy COTS programs”
Today: Motivated by clearly articulated organizational values and behaviors (that reflect an agile mindset), AstraZeneca business teams are beginning to ask how they could bring Agile practices to the work of their teams.
What's important is context:
Understanding the context of how a team works, and what that work is - has been a critical step for business teams to adopt agile practices. What works in one team, does not necessarily work with another team even in the same department.
We will share:
How have we made the steps to adapt agile for business teams?
When we failed, how we failed and what we learned.
Lessons from business teams, video interviews with business leaders and their take on agile and lean mindset
View the Experience Report

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How this 'Agile within Context' approach builds bridges between IT teams and business teams?
  • It's all about stealth marketing - how to start the conversation with the business.
  • Agile as a way for business teams to address rapidly changing priorities, limited resources, and time pressures

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Naveed Khawaja

Naveed Khawaja

Director, Agile & Lean Business Transformation (Master Trainer & Coach), Xecofy Consulting
A busy British father of five who sees the family and life as a whole with the Agile & Lean lens on a daily basis and inspires people all around the world. | | Some friends call him "the KanBan Man" as he helps everyone in being more productive and living a more fulfilled life... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 14:30
Torrey Pines Room 1, 2, & 3

14:00

SESSION FULL: Outcome Metrics Lead To Valuable Practices (Skylar Watson, Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Whereas output metrics (such as stories completed per week) measure aspects of a team’s localized productivity, outcome metrics (such as how much these features increase customer productivity) measure the difference the teams’ work makes in the world.
Focus on output metrics can lead to increased waste and unnecessary stress, and distracts the organization from achieving more valuable outcomes.
In this talk, through stories and group exercises, you’ll see how you can better measure and improve your organization’s effectiveness.

Learning Outcomes:
  • People can tell an outcome metric from an output metric (sparrow deck participation)
  • Connecting the things that we do to the difference they make in the world (by drawing metric chains and then shortcutting them)
  • People stop stressing about things that don’t make a difference (evidence in stories)


Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Anzeneer, Industrial Logic
Tim is a long-time programmer (since 1979), reviewer, speaker, writer. He has been active in many of the big changes in software over the past 36 years (including Design Patterns, Object-Oriented Design, and Agile software development). | | In addition to his contributions in "Clean... Read More →
avatar for Skylar Watson

Skylar Watson

Independent Consultant
Skylar Watson is a software consultant and owner of SkyNet software solutions where he implements high value software to satisfy customers needs. Skylar works with companies both domestically and internationally providing assistance on adopting agile software practices.


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego C

14:00

SESSION FULL: Performance Reviews that don’t Suck (Todd Little)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Let's face it, most performance reviews suck! Many in the agile community suggest abandoning performance reviews, but few offer suggestions for alternatives. A large percentage of software developers work in an enterprise environment where performance reviews are mandated. And even when they are not mandated, what if you could do performance reviews that will honor agile values and not only suck less, but actually provide value to the individual and the organization? Todd will demonstrate such a program that was rolled out successfully with strong support across the enterprise--from the individual colleagues, to people leaders, and even including HR. He will demonstrate the principles and the specific implementation of the system which you can tailor to your organization’s values and constraints. While the system was originally designed to cover developer roles, the approach has been broadened and utilized to cover many knowledge worker roles and then expanded to cover leadership roles.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to go about designing a performance management system that honors agile values and actually provides value to both the organization and the individuals.
  • An approach for developers and other knowledge worker roles
  • An approach for leadership roles


Speakers
avatar for Todd Little

Todd Little

CEO, Lean Kanban Inc
Todd Little is CEO of Lean Kanban Inc., the leading provider of professional Kanban management training. He is also a Founder at Accelinnova, a leadership and agility consulting group. Previously he has held executive roles as Vice President of Product Development for IHS, and Director... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina F

14:00

DevOps Metrics 101 (Dominica DeGrandis)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Are you looking for clarity on what really matters when measuring performance from a DevOps perspective? With so much data available, we'll look at which metrics are the most useful to better understand development, build, deployment, release and maintenance of software. This session brings visibility to the types of metrics that help others learn how DevOps teams measure performance, and how to get started in capturing and using these metrics to understand continuous delivery to customers. Many of these metrics look at how organizations progress towards adoption of continuous deployment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To define the types of metrics used for DevOps transformations.
  • To show how these metrics are measured and interpreted.
  • To give the top three ways to begin capturing and using DevOps metrics.

Attachments:


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 1 & 2

14:00

Agile for Humanity (Dave Cornelius)

Abstract:
This Salon conversation is about “people over process or programs” and an open invitation for you to dream a little about agile as a game changer for humanity. If there was one thing that you would want to use agile to change what would that be? There are many that come to mind and touch me deeply. Perhaps you will find yours as well.
This is a facilitated conversation that enables compassionate discussions and even fierce debates about the application of lean thinking and agile tenets to advance humanity. Think of courage, respect for people, continual learning, etc. that are so people centered, powerful and “normal” for us -- and what could we do when we use them to improve our communities?
Please join this open conversation, dream with us for a moment, and capture some ideas that can be put into motion.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insights you have that others may be overlooking
  • Insights others have that you may be overlooking
  • Ways in which your insights and others’ can enhance each other
  • Things you thought you knew, but there’s more to it than that
  • New beginnings to explore this topic more deeply


Speakers

Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Presidio 1 & 2

14:00

Be Well, Dear Coach (Paul Carvalho)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Do you watch over the emotional well-being of team members to help them grow together with positive team relationships? As a Scrum Master, Agile Team Lead, or Agile Coach, you help others to be their whole best and reach their full potential -- so who helps you and provides you with necessary feedback when you're feeling down?
Do you recognize the symptoms that you might be emotionally or physically compromised? Do you know when you should reach out to a professional for help? In this session we will review topics in physical and mental health that affect our ability to perform at our best, identify factors preventing us from taking care of ourselves, and discuss active approaches to improve our on-going health and well-being.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the impact of various physical and mental stresses on the human body (e.g. categories, signs and symptoms)
  • Outline a plan to help you deal with these stresses so you can be your best

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Carvalho

Paul Carvalho

Agile & DevOps Coach, McKinsey & Company
I help motivated people grow confidently into leaders of collaborative teams that frequently deliver high-quality solutions to their customers. I am a coach, teacher, consultant, mentor, writer, speaker, practitioner and guide. Ask me about being happy & your best self, working through... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marina E

14:00

Improving Interactions (Don Gray)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Ida looked around the table and said, "Teams should have integrity. Do what you say you are going to do. Our team works that way." Frank replied "Well, we do the best we can. We depend on The Alpha Dawgs for a lot of infrastructure. We'll try to work harder next sprint." Sam the manager ended the meeting saying "Well, it doesn't matter what causes the problems. The VP committed the delivery to the client, and we'll just have to keep working longer and harder until we deliver the product."
Do these comments seem familiar? What do you expect to change after this conversation? What's hiding? What's missing in this conversation?
As a coach, one way to improve interactions involves using the Satir Interaction Model to check what people hear and what it means. The Satir Congruence Model ensures self, other, and context balance each other and get represented in the conversation.
In this session we'll explore and apply the Satir Interaction Model, and the Satir Congruence Model to improve interactions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants in this workshop will add and practice two tools to their coaching toolbox. When working with teams they will be able to:
  • Analyze interactions using the Satir Interaction and Congruence models.
  • Differentiate between the communication wobble (incongruent) stances and assist in creating congruent interactions.
  • Help team members clarify intake and meaning.

Attachments:

Speakers
DG

Don Gray

President, n-th Order Systems, Inc
Having worked in software for 30 years I focus my energy and efforts working with executives to create the conditions where teams can flourish developing business value. I facilitate team learning and interdependent work. This includes assessments, embedded coaching, focused coaching... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
San Diego A

14:00

Team Health and Well-being - The only metric that really matters (Andy Cleff)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The single most important indicator of team performance is health and well-being. A strong constitution is necessary for teams to overcome adversity, maintain resilience and nurture a culture rich in collaboration.
A lot of organizations measure how their teams are doing via KPI’s; ROV’s, NPS, and gasp, velocity. Far too often the metrics used are lagging indicators. By the time things have gone off the rails, it’s too late and the damage has been done. The good news is that health and well-being are leading indicators.
However, without some magic pixie dust, you just can’t make people happy.
The good news is that you can experiment and create the conditions that are conducive to team well-being.
A logical question then is: can you measure and visualize the results of your "happiness" experiments and organizational initiatives?
Attend this presentation to find out....

Learning Outcomes:
  • You'll walk away with a toolkit of options to help you visualize your teams' health and well-being.
  • And the next day, you'll be able to start gathering useful data to gain feedback loops on your experiments.
  • You'll also develop an understanding of who team health metrics are really for, as well as antipatterns (Hint: Happiness is NOT the target)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andy Cleff

Andy Cleff

Director, Product Engineering & Agility, RobustWealth
Andy is an experienced and pragmatic agile practitioner that takes teams beyond getting agile to embracing agile. His chief weapons are well-asked questions, insightful retrospectives and an ability to withstand awkward silences. And if all else fails, beer. He is also part of the... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 3 & 4

14:00

Building the Wrong Thing Faster: Two Delivery Successes That Led to Product Failure (Anne Steiner)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
We're often led to believe that a repeatable process and engineering talent are all it takes to ensure product success. If only it were that easy. All too often our focus on making progress and being more efficient leads us to simply "Build the Wrong Thing Faster."
In this talk, Anne Steiner shares the story of two product development efforts that were wildly successful in terms of delivery but were failures in the market. Hear how a video on demand service that could stream TV and movies to your home back when Netflix was still mailing DVDs failed. Learn how a SaaS application that allowed you to deploy a virtual server infrastructure in minutes also failed. Anne discusses the ups and downs of these products and how delivery remained king even after market challenges were revealed.
Then, through a positive example, she'll share strategies for avoiding this trap by putting product learning ahead of (or at least equal to) delivery. You'll learn how product-first thinking led to earlier learning, validation, and ultimately, market success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain strategies for avoiding the trap of putting process and progress ahead of product
  • Learn how product-first thinking leads to earlier learning, validation, and ultimately, market success


Speakers
avatar for Anne Steiner

Anne Steiner

Vice President, cPrime
Anne Steiner is Vice President of the DevJam Practice at cPrime. Let's jam about all things product. I'm looking forward to meeting product-minded folks in all roles on product team.s


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 6

14:00

How Hardware-Software Collaboration Works in Agile Companies (Nancy Van Schooenderwoert)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
After experiencing success with Agile methods in software, companies are increasingly asking whether they can use some form of Agile collaboration for products involving both hardware and software. Three roadblocks come up immediately:
  • Hardware generally has much longer cycle times
  • Hardware teams have deeper specializations, limiting the amount of task sharing
  • Rework (refactoring) for hardware is far more expensive than in software
Agile seeks to cross-skill everyone, but that can only go so far. An electronics designer isn’t going to just “pick up” the skills of a materials scientist. If we use separate engineering teams, we add complexity to our communications patterns. Still for this issue as well as cycle time and rework, real teams have found ways to get the benefits of Agile practices, and even some further benefits they didn’t expect!
There have been substantial surprise benefits. For example, even when hardware groups are not attempting to be agile, merely working in conjunction with agile software teams gave accelerated progress to both! How that works will be examined, and other surprise benefits too.
I'll give examples of varying degrees of collaboration between software and other disciplines (electronics, mechanical, operations, mathematicians…) drawn from my own experience as a tech lead, electronics engineer, and software developer - and also from the experience of other teams doing hardware & software development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how you can combine longer and shorter iterations for h/w and s/w work
  • How to be a team when skills are too different to share Agile-story tasks
  • Ways to leverage the differing constraints of s/w and h/w to help each other
  • Every concept is based on real teams' experiences - no "theory-ware"!


Speakers
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Nancy was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and teaches modern Agile approaches like Mob... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 8

14:00

Using "The Startup Way" to Build Continuous Innovation for Portfolio Initiatives in SAFe (Steve Mayner, Jennifer Fawcett)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The Lean and Agile movements have helped thousands of organizations vastly improve their ability to produce technology centric products with high reliability and quality. Less attention has been given to how companies decide what to build in the first place. There are often far more ideas and opportunities to pursue than the product development capacity of the organization can invest in at one time. How do entrepreneurial leaders of large enterprises make the best decisions on where their new product dollars should go?
The Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) addresses these strategic product decisions in the Portfolio layer guidance through a Kanban process where all new ideas are welcomed, then reviewed and analyzed for go/no go decision making that determine which new initiatives are prioritized for implementation by product development. In Eric Ries' new book The Startup Way, he describes how his advice to the "unicorns" in The Lean Startup can be applied by "the horses" (the larger, established market incumbents) for this same innovation vetting process. This session will synthesize the two bodies of knowledge to provide practical, fresh thinking to senior leaders for creating portfolios of experiments. Attendees will learn how to base product development decisions on validated learning from real customers, fusing an entrepreneurial approach with rigorous decision making for guiding new product investments.
Topics covered will include:
  • Fueling innovation through a "think big, start small, scale fast" continuous exploration process
  • Incorporating the responsibilities of a Growth Board into SAFe Lean Portfolio Management
  • Creating a portfolio of experiments to drive investment decision making through minimum viable products, evidence, experimentation, and vision vs. vanity metrics
  • Translating the most promising experiments into Epics for development by Agile Release Trains (ARTs) based on validated learning and innovation accounting metrics
  • Shifting from project based entitlement funding to value stream metered funding with appropriate liability constraints
  • Aligning the Portfolio Kanban to Ries' recommendations for scaling product exploration
  • Cultivating entrepreneurship as a core discipline and competency in leader development
Participants will engage with the topics through a variety of interactive exercises that reinforce learning and retention of the ideas presented. A list of resources and references will be provided as a handout and and will also be included in the downloadable presentation file available to conference attendees.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Learn how continuous exploration using Lean Startup practices can occur at the portfolio level prior to making a full go-no-go decision for epic-level initiatives in SAFe
  • - Exploit leading indicators and actionable data from validated learning through working prototypes to test leap-of-faith assumptions and to inform the Epic pivot or persevere decision through innovation accounting
  • - Discover how Lean Portfolio Management in SAFe can serve as a Lean Startup Growth Board (decision makers) to make iterative investment decisions on promising innovations
  • - Leverage the role of Epic owner as the internal founder (corporate entrepreneur) in the Lean Startup process for vision, execution, and accountability to the Growth Board
  • - Explore the value of providing opportunities for practitioners and experts on and off Agile Release Trains to form "two pizza teams" for exploratory innovation efforts
  • - Consider the changes needed to existing hiring and career path practices in order to cultivate leaders who are high-potential future founders and corporate entrepreneurs

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Fawcett

Jennifer Fawcett

Fellow and Director of Learning and Certification, Scaled Agile
Jennifer has been providing scaled agile product management, product ownership, executive portfolio coaching and leadership, and software expertise to technology companies for over 28 years before joining Scaled Agile in late 2012.Jennifer spent several years in Product Management... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Marriott Salon 9

14:00

Everything I Know About Leading Diverse Teams I Learned From Roller Derby (Meg Ward)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract: #MeToo, #equalpayday, #HeForShe, Lean In, Project Include, and the Pao Effect are being discussed online and offline around the world - is this a moment or is it a movement?
Maintaining an inclusive culture isn't just for HR - it's our responsibility as leaders to ensure our teams feel safe, valued, and heard. How does a leader foster an environment that allows for equity and fairness for all kinds of diversity? How does a leader recruit and retain a diverse team? Are there other groups or organizations that aren't necessarily using agile methodologies that can provide insight into how to manage this? Yes!
Come learn how to identify, create, and maintain an inclusive culture as a leader using lessons learned from both my career as a software developer and manager and as a roller derby skater. Learn what you gain from and for your team by having strong statements of inclusivity and standardized requirements for everyone at the same level or band. You'll walk away with a better understanding of the many types of diversity, your unconscious biases, and a list of leadership tools and tips you can put in place immediately - all backed by science and research.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how a leader can create and foster a diverse and inclusive team culture
  • Learn methods to reduce/recognize your unconscious biases when making decisions on projects and people
  • Gain a deeper understanding of all the different types of diversity a team can contain and how to accommodate them

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Meg Ward

Meg Ward

Associate Director, Development, IHS Markit
Meg Ward is a political nerd, feminist, homebrewer, roller derby bad ass, software dev and manager with 18 years experience in everything from C++ on HPUX to C# and beyond. She believes experience is the best teacher but a lesson from someone who’s been there can be almost as good... Read More →


Wednesday August 8, 2018 14:00 - 15:15
Balboa/Mission Hills

14:00

Going Beyond “Are We Doomed to Sticky, Tricky, & Icky?”: Shining a Light on Sexism at Work (Sharon Buckmaster, Diana Larsen)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Are you a leader in software development who cares whether women can fully contribute at work? Have you encountered tough situations at work further complicated by issues by gender diversity? If you answered “yes” to the first question, more than likely you also answered “yes” to the second. Difficult working relationships are endemic when gender expectations clash. We can do better. Effective leaders will model